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Good Shows: Get Lost in a Trippy Maze of Sonic Delights; Mosh on a Fresh Grave

(Flyer via the Acheron)

(Flyer via the Acheron)

The Last Punk Gig: Aspects of War, Warthog, Indignation, Porvenir Oscuro 
Friday, July 8, 8 pm at the Acheron: $15.
In honor of the Acheron and the punk scene it has put up with, fed/clothed, and sated for the last six years, the East Williamsburg venue (which is closing due to a struggle with their insurance company) is gathering up its biddies and besties to bid farewell to its hallowed walls. As the venue’s co-owner Bill Dozer promised, they’re filling up the last stretch with a bunch of benefits, including their very last night of business which is dedicated to the family of Brandon Ferrell (former drummer for Municipal Waste), a local musician and friend of everyone, apparently. All profits and bar sales from the show are going to the family, so you can feel good about getting super, super sloshed at the Acheron’s last hurrah.

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Week in Shows: a No Wave Takeover at Trans-Pecos, Plus a Night of Brutal Industrial Noise to Test Your Limits

(Flyer via Trans-Pecos / Other People)

(Flyer via Trans-Pecos / Other People)

Other People Residency
Tuesday Dec. 8th through Friday Dec. 11th at Trans-Pecos

Our favorite no wave loudmouth Lydia Lunch will play at Trans-Pecos on Friday with her band, Teenage Jesus and the Jerks, part of a full week of music curated by Other People. The “serial label,” founded by Nicholas Jarr drops a new rotation of new and nostalgic music each week, and they’ve just put out a stellar collection of the band’s live recordings, Live 1977 – 1979 (which you can stream for free right now over yonder). It’s pretty much the best thing happening this week, and it’s happening all week. Truly, it’s one of those events that helps us justify paying astronomical rents to live in this city.

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Kim Gordon, Deborah Harry and More Host a Mudd Club Revival and Rummage Sale

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Up till now, our footage of DNA at the Mudd Club was as close as you were going to get to reliving a night at the legendary Tribeca club frequented by Warhol, Haring, Lou Reed, David ByrneLydia Lunch and pretty much everyone else who was anyone in downtown New York between 1978 and 1983. But on Nov. 19, you’ll have a chance to experience something close to it.

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Music: Child Abuse, Silk Purse, Lydia Lunch with Weasel Walter and Sandy Ewen, + surprise special guest

Silk Purse is a newish band with members of beloved noise rock outfit Sightings, who went under earlier this summer after 15 years together. High hopes are in order. But better yet, prepare yourself for a performance by Lydia Lunch, backed by bassist/drummer Weasel Walter and artist/avant-garde musician Sandy Ewen. If this show goes anything like her spoken word show went last spring, things are gonna be nothing short of fiery.

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Shows: EP Release from the Dukes of Fuzz and Last Beach Show of the Season

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We’re stuck between seasons here but in the best way possible, experiencing the best of fall and summer all between sun up and sun down. That’s why this week we’re bringing you everything from a sizzling time at the very last Riis Park Beach Bazaar show by the water to a dark rager deep inside the belly of our favorite metal bar. Jump for deets.

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Lydia Lunch Is Back in NYC to Spit Fire and Open Her New Solo Show

ephemera featured in Lunch's new exhibition (courtesy of Lydia Lunch)

ephemera featured in Lunch’s new exhibition (courtesy of Lydia Lunch)

A couple weeks back I was lucky enough to have lunch with Lydia Lunch, a legendary figure in the New York no wave scene and the hurricane-like force behind Teenage Jesus and the Jerks, queen of spoken word, and now a multi-faceted visual artist who remains inextricably tied to the downtown scene of the late 1970s and ’80s despite having left New York City in the dust a long time ago. Understandably, Lunch’s feelings about the city have changed somewhat over the years. “I hate fuckin’ New York,” she told me. “It’s dirty and you’re paying five times too much for every fuckin’ thing. I don’t understand how it can be so expensive and still suck in so many ways. The quality of the food, the subways– I’d rather walk. Rats, disgusting.”

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Feminist Punk Panel Talks Zines, Radical Politics, And Race

Anyone who bemoans feminist discussions for being stuffy, crunchy, woolen affairs is not only looking for a swift punch to the nethers, they’re also dead wrong. A panel held last Thursday at the Brooklyn Museum challenged the Portlandia image of feminism and witnessed several women being their badass selves, see: Lydia Lunch’s impassioned spoken word about race riots and abuse, Narcissister’s short film in which she plays a topless Little Red Riding Hood who “rides” the Hunter, and Johanna Fateman’ trademark Valley Girl diction. Unlike that introductory Women’s Studies course you took as an undergrad, “I Will Resist With Every Inch And Every Breath: Punk Rock And Feminist Art” (named for the Bikini Kill song above) was pretty freaking rad.

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Get Schooled in Future Feminism By Marina Abramović, Laurie Anderson and More

The exhibition is the work of five collaboraters: Antony, Johanna Constantine, Kembra Pfahler, and Sierra and Bianca Casady of CocoRosie. (Photo: The Hole gallery)

The exhibition is the work of five collaboraters: Antony, Johanna Constantine, Kembra Pfahler, and Sierra and Bianca Casady of CocoRosie. (Photo: The Hole gallery)

The future has only just begun at The Hole. Through Sept. 27, the contemporary art gallery on Bowery will host Future Feminism, an exhibition featuring nightly performances and lectures led by some seriously influential artists and feminists. Marina Abramović, Narcissister, Anne Waldman, Bianca and Sierra Casady of CocoRosie, and the East Village’s own Kembra Pfahler are just a few of the performers hosting 13 nights of events.
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The Lineup For the William S. Burroughs 100, From Laurie Anderson to Nick Zedd

The WSB100, a month-long celebration of William S. Burroughs’s centenary, just announced that Cinema of Transgression pioneer Nick Zedd has joined a lineup that already included Steve Buscemi, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, Thurston Moore, John Zorn, DJ Spooky, JG Thirlwell, and many more.
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Nightclubbing | Student Teachers, 1979

Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong continue sorting through their archives of punk-era concert footage as it’s digitized for the Downtown Collection at N.Y.U.’s Fales Library.

(Photo: Steve Lombardi)

It’s that time of year again: Spring break! While college students are streaming like lemmings to the usual spots — Florida, Mexico, the Caribbean — there’s been an uptick of revelers heading for New York this year. You can see them — earbuds in, texting and stumbling around the Lower East Side and Williamsburg, updating their absent pals. We hope they’re enjoying themselves.
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Nightclubbing | The Dead Boys

Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong are sifting through their voluminous archive of punk-era concert footage as it’s digitized for the Downtown Collection at N.Y.U.’s Fales Library. Here’s this week’s trip down memory lane, starting with a word form Jeff Magnum, bassist for the Dead Boys.

Stiv Bators (Credit: Emily Armstrong/Nightclubbing)

Stiv Bators (Credit: Emily Armstrong/Nightclubbing)

I was working in a record store, it was horrible. Farmers would come in demanding John Denver, or say, “Do you have that record they play on the radio…” But at least there was Rocket From the Tombs. They were the only good band in Cleveland in the early 1970s, and I went to see ’em play a lot! I heard they were breaking up but they were playing one last gig (Bators and Cheetah were gonna start a new band). I went to that last gig and I walked up to Cheetah, who I never met, and told him, “I’m the bass player yer lookin’ for!” That new band was called Frankenstein (Bators, Cheetah, Blitz, Zero, and me).” [In 1976, the band left for New York without Magnum, and booked a gig at CBGBs. They came back for him, and returned to the city as the Dead Boys.] We went on this 20-hour car ride, the whole time them telling me how great it will all be, that they had a place and that we would be playing at the greatest club in the world. I got to the club and said, “What a shit-hole.” But it became our living room. We were there every night and when we played, we kicked ass.— Jeff Magnum

The Dead Boys held a special status at CBGBs. They were managed by the club’s owner, Hilly Krystal, and played there more than any other band. Keep Reading »