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Pencil This In: John Waters Is Making Multiple Maniacal Appearances For His New Book

Unless your mind is addled by poppers, you’ll recall that John Waters gave a commencement address to Rhode Island School of Design’s Class of 2015. Now the text of the speech– which includes pearls of wisdom like “go out in the world and fuck it up beautifully”– is being published in the form of an illustrated book, Make Trouble, and the Prince of Puke is making some local appearances to promote it.

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Brooklyn Steel Will Open With 5 LCD Soundsystem Shows

James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem. (Photo: Daniel Leinweber | Razberry Photography)

Now that LCD Soundsystem is back on the touring circuit, they’re kind of the Dave Chappelle of dance rock— they disappeared at the height of their game, reemerged with a surprise show and these days are pretty easy to catch live (we caught them at Panorama last year), but there’s still some residual mystique that makes doing so feel kinda special. (Just witness all the hoopla over Chappelle’s recent appearance with Chris Rock.) And so it’s with some fanfare that Brooklyn Steel announced, today, that it will open with five LCD shows, April 6 to 11.

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Watch This New Show to Find Out What the Dogs of Tompkins Really Think About You

Something strange is happening in the American psyche right now. Just a few years ago, the heroes of New York City-centric comedy TV were disconnected 20-somethings with suspiciously fancy apartments who wandered the earth clueless as to why no one wanted to date their flawless Tinder profile/soulless body. Now, they’re much tinier creatures that we rarely notice IRL and if we do, we’re like gagging and pointing and screaming: “Gawwwwd, I think that rat is bubonic.”

Hot on the hoofs of Louis CK’s The Secret Life of Pets, and HBO’s Animals (which just returned for season two), a new animated feature from Brooklyn-based animation company Cartuna offers a peek at what these city-dwelling creatures see in us humans. Obviously, it ain’t pretty.

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How the Velvet Underground’s Roommate Played Second Fiddle to Fellow Inventors of Minimalism

When Lou Reed died in 2013, we looked back on his early days on the Lower East Side. Reed began collaborating with John Cale at 56 Ludlow Street, in the $25-a-month apartment of Tony Conrad; the name of the band Reed and Cale formed, the Velvet Underground, came from an S&M novel Conrad found on the street. Unlike Nico, Warhol, and others associated with the Velvets, Conrad isn’t a household name, and wasn’t mentioned when The Velvet Underground & Nico turned 50 this month. But Tony Conrad: Completely in the Present, opening at Anthology Film Archives this Friday, seeks to remedy that.

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Art This Week: Bushwick Cartoonists Move To Midtown, The High-Story of Glass Pipes

Redsnapper, HAT (High Alien Life) Meteorite, 2016, Borosilicate glass, 5 x 3 x 3 inches (image via apexart)

Outlaw Glass
Opening Wednesday March 29 at apexart, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through May 27.

I caught wind (or rather, smoke?) of this show through an email with the subject line “Weed really like to see you at our opening.” As I love subtlety, I of course opened the email. What I found was actually more intriguing and complex than one may imagine: an artistic showcase and exploration of the many variations and “legally grey” nature of glass pipes. Or um, I mean, “functional glass art.”

The show, organized by David Bienenstock and presented by the ever-interesting apexart, takes a deep dive into the legacy of pipes, bongs, and their makers. Bienenstock, who formerly served as Head of Content for High Times and has published two whole books centered around lighting up, seems to really know his stuff. A cursory browse of the pieces (heh) that will be on view shows a wide range from highbrow to lowbrow and everything in between. You’ll find everything from works by the historic Bob Snodgrass, who peddled intricate handmade creations to Deadheads aplenty, to a big glass monster truck and a pipe with a built-in mustache that could very well be found at your local Urban Outfitters.

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LES Rape Suspect Arrested; Budget Five-Course Dinner in Greenpoint

Robert Adames, 41, was arrested for approximately the 40th time after allegedly attempting to rape a Norfolk Street woman in her apartment on March 3. [NBC NY]

More than $10K has been raised to aid the family of Rame Pierluisse, the 13-year-old boy who fell off a Bushwick roof and died on Friday. [DNA Info]

On the Lower East Side, later this spring the Seward Park Cooperative will vote on whether sell $46.5 million in air rights to real estate agency Ascend Group. [DNA Info]

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Here Are Some of the Anti-Trump Comics Being Shown at The Living Gallery Tonight

Looks like throwback anti-Trump comics are officially a thing.

At the Spring/Break show earlier this month, Mr. Vinyl’s pop-art series, The Cisco Kid Vs. Donald Trump, paired Trump takedowns with images pulled from the 1950s comic strip. Tonight at The Living Gallery, “Pussy Grabs Back: A Night of Anti-Trump Comics” will feature the work of Christine Stoddard, a self-proclaimed “fairy punk” who pairs anti-Trump sentiment with fairy tales.

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California Invasion, Pop. 1280’s First Gig of the Year, and More Good Shows

Fred Thomas (Image via PopGun)

Fred Thomas, Kyle Forester, What Next? 
Wednesday March 29, 8 pm at Union Pool: $12

Back in 2007 when Saturday Looks Good to Me had found its way into CMJ, the Detroit Metro Times wondered, “Will Success Spoil Fred Thomas?” The short answer has turned out to be, no, not really. The slightly longer one is that Fred Thomas is a nice guy. So nice is Fred Thomas, that even after finding some well-deserved recognition in a fast-shrinking corner of music that is still confoundingly known as “indie rock,” he still does normal cool-dude stuff. He recently even stooped to record the lowliest trash-life punk that Detroit has to offer: the K9 Sniffies, whose members I hesitate to even call “musicians” (but who I am obligated to admit are my friends, or whatever).

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How Jeremy Nguyen Went From Bushwick Satirist to New Yorker Cartoonist

Photo by Tony Wolf

Last time we spoke with Jeremy Nguyen, he had created a custom crayon for his newly released book of cartoons, Stranger Than Bushwick. The crayon’s color– Gentrify White— spoke to the wry satire found in his comics for Bushwick Daily. Volume three of Stranger Than Bushwick will debut this weekend at the MoCCA Arts Festival. It’s longer than the others, but will be “the last issue I publish for a long time while I move on to other projects,” according to the 27-year-old. That’s sure to disappoint his many local fans, but it’s hard to blame Jeremy for moving on. In January he started submitting cartoons to the New Yorker, a process that is notoriously selective. Incredibly, he sold his first one three weeks later, after pitching just 30 pieces. Since then, he has sold two more.

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This Film Festival About Getting Wasted Puts the ‘Cans’ in Cannes

We all know that so-called cinephiles jet off to places like SXSW just to booze it up on the company dime, but just try getting them to admit that they can’t read the notes they took after that third jalapeno margarita at Alamo Drafthouse. A film fest coming to Greenpoint in May, however, is pretty upfront about all that. An announcement for In Vino Veritas: Secrets of the Intoxicated Life says the program of shorts will explore “how getting wasted can elevate the spirit, enhance our creativity, make us wiser, deliver us onto freedom or otherwise improve the human condition.” Unless, of course, you’re Mel Gibson.

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Bushwick Teen Falls to Death; 2nd Ave Explosion Site May Be Sold

Residents who are suing their landlord over the 2nd Avenue explosion of two years ago fear that an impending sale will prevent them from receiving settlement money. [NY Post]

A teenager who fell to his death from the roof of a Bushwick building may have believed that he was being chased by police. [NY Daily News]

The former Pfizer site in South Williamsburg will be converted to “upscale religious housing” for Orthodox Jews. [The Real Deal].

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Week in Film: a Very Lynchian Retrospective, Full-Frontal Greek Mythology, and More


Metamorphoses
Saturday March 25 (10 pm),  Sunday March 26 (7:30 pm), Tuesday March 28 (10 pm) Thursday March 30 (10 pm) at Spectacle: $5, advance tickets available 

You know what’s cool about ancient Greek mythology? It looks good on almost anyone. Even 21st-century French people, as you’ll see in Christophe Honoré’s new film Metamorphoses. It’s actually based on a really old poem–but you already knew that by the film’s title right? Metamorphoses (the original) dates to about 8 AD when this Roman dude named Ovid fused bits from more than 250 existing Greek mythos together to create a pretty wacky piece of non-linear literature that defies the standard didactic, A-to-B tellings that were popular back then. Thankfully, Ovid’s story is every bit as riveting as the OG mythos, which are always chock-full gore, guts, adultery, betrayal and, of course, horny gods mingling with orgy-prone mortals.

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