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Rockaway’s Wave of Activity: Fresh Sand, Concerts at Rippers, New Food at Riis

The Rocakaway concessions were already gearing up this past weekend, with Caracas and the 97th Street fam (Low Tide Bar, La Cevicheria, Edible Island, and High 97, etc.) all open on the boardwalk. In addition, the folks at displaced DIY venue Shea Stadium just announced that they’re programming a summer concert series, featuring Bethlehem Steel and other bands and DJs, at everyone’s favorite burger stand, Rippers. Now, the Riis Park Beach Bazaar, over on the Fort Tilden side of the peninsula, has announced its lineup of vendors and programming. More →

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The New Essex Market Celebrated Its Opening, 79 Years in the Making

Essex Street Market’s customers with volunteers from the Lower Eastside Girls Club during its grand opening event, 5/18/19.

The new incarnation of Essex Market was so packed during its grand opening Saturday that one could barely walk down the crowded aisles of the modern, atrium-like space. Beyond the main entrance on the corner of Delancey and Essex, we were engulfed by the line for cupcakes at Sugar Sweet Sunshine, which now has a stall there in addition to their 16-year-old store on Rivington Street. More →

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Art This Week: Extinct Fish and Playable Simulations

(image via Rubber Factory)

fish mystery in the shift horizon
Opening Wednesday, May 22 at Rubber Factory, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through June 23.

The natural world is so vast and multifaceted it can seem like an impossible task to quantify it all. In fact, sometimes it is, and the scientific inability to identify a species’s baseline population size (known as “shifting baseline syndrome”) is one of the driving factors behind Catalina Ouyang’s latest show of sculptures and videos, which also draws from notions of diaspora and mistranslation. Huge, curious, jade-colored creatures populate the gallery space, looking simultaneously like cows, humans, fish, and some other fantastical creation entirely. They’re based off the Chinese paddlefish and baiji, creatures that are now extinct but once had a shifting baseline. The opening reception on Wednesday will not only feature Ouyang’s sculptures and videos, but also a durational performance among the aquatic creatures.

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Performance Picks: Kissing, True Crime, Macaulay Culkin

THURSDAY

(image via Eventbrite)

Quitters
Thursday, May 16 at C’mon Everybody, 8 pm: $8 advance, $10 doors

Whom among us has not quit something? This shared sentiment typically unites the room at Quitters, Sam Corbin and Ian Goldstein’s monthly comedy show that asks performers to ruminate upon the times they decided to throw in the towel. However, the quitting isn’t entirely pervasive, as the show is celebrating two whole consistent years of existence tonight. Yes, that’s two years without quitting, or at least without quitting this once specific thing. The folks helping the two hosts celebrate their commitment to the quit include Rachel Kaly, Shalewa Sharpe, Rachel Pegram, and Chris Donahue, and a portion of the ticket proceeds will be going to the ACLU. More →

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How a ‘White Guy From Long Island’ Became a Gonzo Action-Movie Star in Uganda

Before Bad Black screened at Alamo Drafthouse Brooklyn last night, there was a promo clip showing commandos dropping out of a fake, obviously green-screened helicopter and machine-gunning Katz’s Delicatessen into a ridiculously large fireball. The clip’s Lower East Side setting was bizarre given that it was a promo for the movies of gonzo director Isaac Nabwana, who has shot over 40 films in his village outside of Kampala, Uganda. Last night the film’s producer and star, Alan Hofmanis, revealed the fun story behind the Katz’s fireball. More →

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Art This Week: Incarceration Meditations, Awkward Domesticity, and More

(image courtesy of Rachel Margolin)

Broken Heaven
Opening Tuesday, May 14 at 7 Franklin Place, 6 pm to 10 pm. One night only.

Art exhibitions featuring people who are formerly or currently incarcerated have been fairly common, but it would be unproductive to shoehorn them into a category. After all, no one goes about remarking about how there are too many art exhibitions featuring people who live in houses. If you’ve yet to go to an art show that draws from the profound and traumatic experience of incarceration on creators, or even if you have, head to Tribeca tonight for a show by the formerly incarcerated artist Pingo, who will be showing his work to the public for one night before a stint at this year’s Art Basel Miami. Pingo’s work is abstract and textural, recalling Jackson Pollock and utilizing shocks of colorful paint to convey a landscape of emotion. Not only that, but the exhibition will also include ice sculptures.

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Eco Warriors and Trash Dancers Paraded Through the East Village

(Photos: Laura Lee Huttenbach)

George Bliss, who lives in the West Village and builds tricycles, was lamenting the fact that New York has changed. “It used to be much more surprising,” he said. “You never knew what you were going to see walking down the street. Everyone was an individual. Now, most people are trying to conform.” Exactly at the moment he said this, a tall, bearded man wearing a long-sleeved tiger t-shirt, red suspenders, zebra pants, and bigfoot slippers walked past. His mustache was styled into two upward curls on which it looked like you could hang a very small coat.  Gold sunglasses in the shape of hearts covered his eyes. He had a ring through his nose. Items spilled off his top hat, including a unicorn horn, bunny ears, bull horns, and one antler. On his belt loop, several tails—including a crocodile, beaver pelt, and fake felt dragon—swung from his waist, next to mug that said, “I’m famous in Bushwick.” George regarded the bearded man in bigfoot slippers. “You see,” said George. “There used to be many more like him.” More →