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Pie an Artist in the Face and Then Eat the World’s Biggest Bagel and Lox

Imagine this bagel sandwich, but 50 times bigger. Photo courtesy of Acme Smoked Fish

If you’ve ever wanted to throw a pie in someone’s face, now’s your chance. Jennifer Rubell, the conceptual artist who built a giant cookie jar resembling Hillary Clinton’s pantsuit, is inviting you to fling pies at her during a performance at the new Meredith Rosen Gallery, opening next week. Or maybe you’d rather stuff your own face with bagels? Head over to Brooklyn’s Acme Smoked Fish next Friday, where they’re building a super-sized (we’re talking a few hundred pounds here) bagel sandwich in honor of National Bagel and Lox Day.

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New Yorkers Share Stories of Union Pool, Williamsburg’s Notorious ‘Boyfriend Store’

(Photo: Andrew Karcie for NY Mag)

In a story for The Cut that describes Union Pool as the “horny utopia of 2000s Williamsburg,” Allison P. Davis highlights what’s probably the main attraction of the bar: the potential for hookups. Since there’s nothing New Yorkers love more than bonding over a dive, Twitter exploded with users sharing their own Union Pool stories– it was even a trending topic on Wednesday. Which goes to show just how pivotal the former pool supply store is for getting laid, if you’re a hipster of a certain age. Below, some of the best (and worst!) reactions to the story on Twitter.
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Girl Power: Metrograph and Nitehawk Focus On Female Filmmakers

Image via Metrograph’s website

The lack of female directors in the film industry isn’t exactly a new phenomenon, but with the rise of movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp in the past year, this gender gap has been highlighted now more than ever– just take Natalie Portman’s presentation of the Best Director award at this year’s Golden Globes as an example. Nitehawk Cinema and Metrograph, two local movie theaters, are also recognizing this disparity with a series of film screenings focusing exclusively on female directors.

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Tartt House Film: The Goldfinch Begins Shooting in the Village

(Photo: Libby Torres)

The highly anticipated adaptation of Donna Tartt’s 2013 novel The Goldfinch began filming in Greenwich Village this Friday, with film crews taking over sections of 11th and 12th streets between 5th Avenue and University Place. In case you were living under a rock in 2014, The Goldfinch won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction that year, and was selected as one of the 10 best books of 2013 by the New York Times Book Review.

The novel is a Dickensian bildungsroman; it tells the story of Theodore Decker, who becomes involved in art theft and forgery after a troubled childhood. Ansel Elgort is reportedly set to play the adult Theodore, while Finn Wolfhard (yes, of Stranger Things fame) has been cast as the younger version of Boris, Theodore’s childhood friend. Sarah Paulson, Luke Wilson, and Jeffrey Wright are all supposedly part of the cast as well.

While the film unfortunately won’t be released until 2019, you might as well get started on the book in the meantime– it’s a whopping 784 pages long.

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Citi Bike Sets Up Shop in Riis Houses, Hoping to Boost Low-Income Ridership

(Photo: Citi Bike on Instagram)

The operators of Citi Bike are set to open facilities in the Jacob Riis Houses in Alphabet City, a move that they hope will bring more low-income riders to the bike-share program and make it easier for existing users to score a ride.

The new base of operations is located in what the New York City Housing Authority describes as “an existing facility in an underutilized space,” at 152-154 Avenue D. Motivate, the operators of Citi Bike, hope it will lead to a more balanced system, meaning no more showing up to stations to find there are no bikes to rent. Citi Bike general manager Kris Sandor also hopes it will help with community outreach. “We are again looking to support and engage with everybody, especially for ridership, but then also for our hiring practices,” Sandor said. “We’re really looking to make sure that we’re engaging with lower-income communities.”

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Photos: Last Night at Schiller’s Liquor Bar, Now Closed After 14 Years

Manager Michael Reynolds (right) with his girlfriend Sam outside Schiller’s on its final night. (Photo: Nick McManus)

Schiller’s Liquor Bar closed out its last night Sunday with cheers, confetti and cocktails galore. The bistro, which in May announced that it would shutter due to a rent hike, remained crowded well past its normal midnight closing hour and food was also served late. Longtime patron Michael Reynolds, who also co-owns neighboring Black Crescent, held court at the center of the bar where he stood on the stretchers of his stool, cheered, and liberally passed drinks to friends.

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35,000 Drawings Turn a Vampire Classic Into a Story of Immigrant New York

For three years, Italian artist Andrea Mastrovito and a dozen assistants have slaved away on NYsferatu: a Symphonie of a Century, a remake of the 1922 vampire classic Nosferatu, but made out of 35,000 hand-drawn pictures. “This movie is my second wife right now,” Mastrovito told us. “We are always together, me and NYsferatu. And even if I love it, I love and hate it. NYsferatu has sucked my blood.”

At last, this Monday, the film will premiere at Pier 63.

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City Council Passes Sweeping Tenant Protections

Credit: Community Development Project at the Urban Justice Center.

Yesterday the City Council passed a sweeping package of pro-tenant legislation long advocated by tenants’ rights groups, activists, and sympathetic city officials. One of the key organizations that lobbied for the legislation, the “Stand for Tenant Safety” coalition, held a support rally outside City Hall.

The main target of the new legislation is the widespread practice of “construction as harassment,” whereby landlords use invasive, unsafe, and sometimes illegal construction to drive out tenants. Typically the landlords are trying to get rent-regulated tenants out so they can charge market rents.

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Worlds Fair Coming to Brooklyn Promises Art, Food, Tech, Tim Kaine

“Worlds Fairs have inspired Alexander Graham Bell, Nikola Tesla, and many others to express their brilliance. For 130 years, American cities set the standard for Worlds Fairs. Now it’s time to rebuild the world’s greatest stage in the United States, and inspire the pursuit of our best possible future.”

So says the manifesto of Worlds Fair USA, an organization which describes itself as “an independent effort to bring the international showcase of the future, featuring the world’s most amazing technology, art, and more, back to the United States.” More →

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New LES Beer Store Promises to Cure What Ales You

Credit: Beer Fridge.

A new craft beer store is coming to the Lower East Side: Beer Fridge, at 41 Essex St., is currently in soft launch, with the official opening “hopefully sometime in the next few weeks,” according to owner Cat DiPaci.

“We’re working out the kinks,” she added. DiPaci, 26, is a first-time entrepreneur. In terms of industry qualifications, “I’m a very avid beer drinker,” she said.

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