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Roosevelt Island Cherry Blossom Festival: Neoliberal Disaster or Neo-Fascist Catastrophe?

(Photo via @luciuswok onTwitter)

Everyone in the train car looked up in comic bewilderment as the E train glided past the platform of Roosevelt Island Station. “Due to police activity, the E train will not stop at this station,” the conductor announced. Confused and in a futile, panicked hurry, the passengers rushed out at the next stop to beat the growing crowd to the opposite platform; they would try again. It was already 3:36pm, and the Roosevelt Island Cherry Blossom Festival was well underway.

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Natural History Museum Catches Heat as ‘Trump of the Tropics’ Is Honored

(Photo: J.M. Luijt)

Drama gripped Museum Mile this month with heightened debates about the Sackler family’s contributions to the Met, Guggenheim…and the opioid epidemic. This weekend, the American Museum of Natural History made controversial news of its own when it was discovered that the museum had rented space to a nonprofit planning to honor Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, nicknamed “The Trump of the Tropics,” with its Person of the Year Award.

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New Yorkers Mark Triangle Shirtwaist Anniversary and Push For Permanent Memorial

(Photos: Cecilia Nowell)

Eight chalk silhouettes cover the sidewalk at the corner of Greene Street and Washington Place. Earlier today, union members, activists, city officials and others gathered outside the landmarked site of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory to honor the 108th anniversary of the historic blaze that revealed abhorrent working conditions but ultimately strengthened the labor movement.

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How NYC’s Broken Food Cart System Leaves Vendors Scraping By

A NYC street vendor. (Photo by Jazz Guy via Wikimedia Commons)

Day and night, Tapash Sarkar, a Bangladeshi street vendor in lower Manhattan clinks his spatulas as he cooks biryani behind a fingerprint-stained food truck window. “I’m new here, I’ve been at this food cart for 15 days. I came to New York because my country had some problems, religion problems with the Hindus, so that’s why I came here with my family,” Sarkar says.

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Should We Smack an ‘Oligarch Tax’ On Out-of-Towners With Sick Crash Pads?

Brad Hoylman speaks. (Photo: Dave Colon)

Seizing on the opportunity that comes with a massive advantage in both houses of the state legislature, Democratic lawmakers are making a renewed push for a tax on pied-à-terres, non-primary residences favored by the super-rich who’d rather pop in to a penthouse for a weekend visit than crash on their friend’s couch. Yesterday afternoon, the bill’s Albany sponsors and city politicians linked up to urge support on both the city and state level.
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L Stations Get Elevators, But Critics Say MTA Still Too Slow On Accessibility

(Photos: Clarrie Feinstein)

Susan Scheer lives in the East Village and her daughter lives just across the river. But jumping on the L train to visit her isn’t an option. Scheer uses a wheelchair, and there’s no elevator at the First Avenue stop. “What would be a five-minute commute for most people, isn’t even possible for me,” says Scheer. Oftentimes, her daughter must make the commute to see her.

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After 50 Years, a Hidden Refuge For American Indians Faces a Funding Crisis

(Photos: Clarrie Feinstein)

One could easily pass the unassuming building at 39 Eldridge Street, on an uncommonly quiet side-street in Chinatown, without knowing it’s home to a New York institution. But take the tiny elevator to the fourth floor and you’ll find a bare-bones space with an L-shaped sofa, conference table and kitchen. A welcome sign greets newcomers and regulars to the American Indian Community House (AICH), a place to gather, educate and learn.

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Disco Discord: NYPD and Nightlife Owners Clash Over Party-Crashing ‘Raids’

(photo: Cassidy Dawn Graves)

Brooklyn DIY staples Palisades and Silent Barn are just two of many nightlife spaces that have been subject to a Multi-Agency Response to Community Hotspots, or MARCH—a Giuliani-era creation that summons members of the NYPD, FDNY, State Liquor Authority, Department of Buildings, and more to an establishment that’s been deemed problematic, usually at peak weekend hours and usually without warning.

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Here’s the L-Shutdown Beer That’ll Get You Through Those 20-Minute Waits for a Train

When Governor Cuomo talked about the “toxic cocktail” inside of the L-train tunnel, he definitely wasn’t talking about the hot new drink. But, go figure, there’s now an L-shutdown-themed beer.

The new brew, dubbed What the L?, will be launched by Blue Point, the brewing company that just threw a free Matt and Kim show at Avant Gardner. In April, they’ll give even more love to Williamsburg– the neighborhood where Vice’s Old Blue Last was born— with a helles-style, 5.2-percent-ABV lager.

If the label art looks familiar, it’s because it was designed by Winston Tseng, the graphic designer who put up those fake “Your Train Is Delayed” posters in the Bleecker Street subway station. He’s also the guy who trolled Trumpers by wrapping an East Village garbage bin in a “KEEP NYC TRASH FEE” PSA.

According to a press release, What the L? was originally meant “to bring relief to New Yorkers during the 15-month shutdown, but at this point we’re here for New Yorkers to commiserate on what the L is going on!”

Of course, there’s no drinking on MTA trains or in subway stations. But with the Times saying riders are stuck in transportation purgatory” and the Post saying that a new MTA mitigation plan amounts to straphanger hell” (Cuomo says the plan seen by the Post is out of date), you’ll probably want to brown-bag it.