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Photos From the Massive Anti-Pride Rally, the Queer Liberation March

(Photos: Amanda Feinman)

Twenty blocks north of the World Pride parade kick-off yesterday, thousands in Bryant Park were singing. Sing Out, Louise! passed out pink-and-black “hymnals”—protest lyrics, set to recognizable Americana (“Somewhere over the rainbow, love trumps hate/Black lives matter to all, and Muslims can immigrate”). When those in attendance came to outnumber the print-outs, latecomers snapped photos of their neighbors’ copies, and followed along on their phones. More →

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The Stonewall 50 Rally Drew Pride Celebrants of All Stripes

Thousands of people from all over the world crowded around Christopher Park on Friday to mark the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Inn uprising, several nights in the summer of 1969 when patrons of the Greenwich Village gay bar and their allies fought back against routine police harassment and ultimately catalyzed the LGBTQ rights movement. We asked the rally’s attendees where they came from, and what brought them to the dive that’s now a national monument and a worldwide symbol of pride and resistance. Play the video to hear their stories.

Video by Doreen Wang.

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LGBTQ-Friendly Senior Housing Development Cleared For Controversial Elizabeth Street Garden Site

Raymond Figueroa, president of the New York City Community Garden Coalition, at a rally to save Elizabeth Street Garden last year. (Photo: Ryan Krause)

In the latest chapter of a divisive issue that has pitted garden advocates against city officials and affordable-housing supporters, the City Council approved Haven Green on Wednesday, potentially cinching the fate of the Elizabeth Street Garden, where the city wants to build the development for senior citizens. Now, the project must win in the legal arena as well, after two grassroots organizations filed lawsuits against New York City the first week of March. More →

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After Nearly 40 Years in the Subway, a Flower Man Stops Peddling

(Photos: Jo Corona)

Since his early twenties, Peter Tsoumas would open his flower kiosk with a steaming cup of coffee in one hand and the Greek-American newspaper Ekirikas in the other. A man with a gruff countenance belying a winsome personality, Tsoumas started his business in the late 1960s in Jamaica, Queens, but in 1980 the MTA leased him a nook in the 1st Ave L train station and he has remained there ever since.

“I came in young and I leave an old man,” he told Bedford + Bowery on Monday. After almost half a century of selling flowers to rushing New Yorkers, the Greek native is retiring. Friday will be his last day.

One of his daughters wanted to make a Friday reservation for dinner at Kyclades, the Greek tavern just outside of the train station, to celebrate the date. But Tsoumas said no. “I don’t want my kids to spend money on me. Also, Friday my head is going to be like this,” he said, making a gesture as if it was exploding. He has already started cleaning the shelves from his corner kiosk and the void of the missing objects has been hard on him. As the flowers surrounding him dwindle in numbers—his last purchase was at the beginning of the week—Tsoumas was left reflecting on his memories and his life decisions.

Peter was born Periklís Tsoumas in March of 1948 in the idyllic Western Greek coastal town of Nafpaktos, where young people live a “beautiful life,” in his words, and where Greek mythology says descendants of Hercules built a fleet to invade the Peloponnese.

When he was seven years old, young Tsoumas picked up a book about the US and later that night summarily decided he was going to go to America. His father thought his son had gone mad, but Tsoumas just said, “Yes, I read a book, it says so many nice things.” And so when he turned 20, he traveled to New York. The year of his arrival, he opened the first store in Jamaica and soon after that married his wife, also of Greek descent. “Thank god, I’m happy,” he said.

Although the imminent shutdown of the L train station would have forced Tsoumas to close his shop anyway, he thinks the train repairs came at the right time. “My energy is no good no more,” he said with his heavy Greek accent. “I can’t do it no more, I’m tired.”

Tsoumas remembered that when he first started his business, flower concessions such as Gus Florist, Flowers for all Occasions populated the train stations in the city. Regular folk bought flowers everyday; they “needed” the flowers, he said. Fridays was a particularly good sales day, as were the long dreary days of winter. But now, the money was to be found doing flower arrangements for weddings, funerals or parties, “nothing else.” Tsoumas bemoaned that young people don’t “believe” in flowers anymore and the big retail companies are snuffing out small tradesmen with their wholesale prices.

As we spoke, an elderly woman with big eyes approached the stand and rested her cane against one of the station’s columns as she gazed at the bouquets. Tsoumas came out from behind the flowers and told her he wouldn’t be there next week. “I have bad news, I’m leaving. I’m retiring,” he said, leaning briefly into her.

“Oh, congratulations!” the woman replied and patted him gently on the chest.

“Thank you so much, I appreciate it,” he said.

The gray-haired woman said that she had known Tsoumas for at least 20 years and that whenever she visited the neighborhood she would get flowers from him. She wished him good luck and reminded him to keep doing “something” after retirement.

He nodded, smiling. That is a fear he has: stopping. “If I make it past the first six months I have a long life ahead of me,” he said, sitting back on his black and metal stool. He compared himself to an old car. If you keep it running, it will sputter along. But if you stop the engine, “kaput!” Tsoumas interjected. “But the car goes to the garbage… Me? I go six feet down.”

Cognizant of this, the flower man has his first months of retirement carefully mapped out: on July 6 he travels to his hometown—the place with the long history and crystalline-water beaches. Family members will take turns traveling to meet him at the house he and his wife have there. Tsoumas flies back to New York in September.

The prospect of spending a lot of time with his three granddaughters excites him. “One week, two weeks I stay home and relax. And after that? Tell me,” he asked, shuffling his white tennis shoes back and forth.

He’s thinking that even with the flower concession gone, once a month he might visit the neon-lighted station that provided him with his livelihood so that he can hang around and greet his formerly faithful clientele. One of those customers, a spectacled man clad in elegant wine-colored pants and a vest, approached Tsoumas’ corner.

“Hey Peter, how you feeling, man?” he asked.

“I’m okay,” Tsoumas replied, his squinting face quickly breaking into a beaming smile.

On Friday, Tsoumas will end his professional life giving away whatever flowers he doesn’t sell.

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The 37th Mermaid Parade Was a Sight to Sea

This past weekend marked the longest day of the year–and also the wildest. Sea creatures of all stripes and scales glittered under the Coney Island sun on Saturday as the 37th annual Mermaid Parade made its way down Surf Avenue, with Arlo and Nora Guthrie serving as King and Queen Neptune. Watch our video to see the seahorses, pirates, and the utterly unclassifiable.

Video by Roberto Bosoms.

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Eco Warriors and Trash Dancers Paraded Through the East Village

(Photos: Laura Lee Huttenbach)

George Bliss, who lives in the West Village and builds tricycles, was lamenting the fact that New York has changed. “It used to be much more surprising,” he said. “You never knew what you were going to see walking down the street. Everyone was an individual. Now, most people are trying to conform.” Exactly at the moment he said this, a tall, bearded man wearing a long-sleeved tiger t-shirt, red suspenders, zebra pants, and bigfoot slippers walked past. His mustache was styled into two upward curls on which it looked like you could hang a very small coat.  Gold sunglasses in the shape of hearts covered his eyes. He had a ring through his nose. Items spilled off his top hat, including a unicorn horn, bunny ears, bull horns, and one antler. On his belt loop, several tails—including a crocodile, beaver pelt, and fake felt dragon—swung from his waist, next to mug that said, “I’m famous in Bushwick.” George regarded the bearded man in bigfoot slippers. “You see,” said George. “There used to be many more like him.” More →

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Stronger Vision Zero Plan Demanded in Wake of Increasing Traffic Deaths

(Photos: Cecilia Nowell)

A bike messenger delivered two bags of fresh-cut flowers to City Hall just in time for Transportation Alternatives and Families for Safe Streets to take to the steps. At noon, members of the two organizations, joined by sympathetic city council members, laid pink roses and yellow carnations at the steps of City Hall– alongside photographs of loved ones who had died in traffic accidents. The organizations had joined forces to declare a state of emergency on Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Vision Zero Plan. More →

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A Hidden Movie Theater and Underground Cruising Spot Has Left the East Village

Abel Ferrara’s The Projectionist, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival on Sunday, is a scrappy love letter to New York’s independent cinemas, as seen through the eyes of Nicolas Nicolaou, the owner of some of the city’s oldest and most beloved theaters: Cinema Village near Union Square, Cinemart in Forest Hills, and the Alpine Cinemas in Bay Ridge. But the documentary somehow fails to mention what might be Nicolaou’s most intriguing theater, the Bijou, an underground cruising spot that was one of the East Village’s best-kept secrets until it closed a week ago. More →

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As L Hell Begins, Some Aren’t On Board With the MTA’s Plan For Buses

(Photo: InSapphoWeTrust via WikiCommons)

With a slowdown of the L line beginning April 26, Manhattan residents are protesting the MTA’s plan to cut around 17 stops from the bus line that runs across 14th Street and through Alphabet City.

The proposed plan would turn the M14 A/D bus, which crosses 14th and runs up and down Avenues A and D, into a Select Bus Service (SBS) line. Certain local stops will be gone as soon as June or July, with every other stop in the Lower East Side being eliminated.  

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