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Another Sex Toy Company Says MTA Advertising Jerked Them Around

(image courtesy of Dame Products)

These days, trains are delayed often enough for you to get a good look at whatever advertisements emblazon the subway walls. You might see ads for luxury scrubs or the city’s $15 minimum wage rollout, or perhaps ones for breast augmentation, birth control, or pitches for erectile dysfunction meds featuring limp cacti or simply the words “erectile dysfunction meds.” But you won’t be seeing ads for sex toys, as Dame Products has become the second sex toy company to have their ads considered and subsequently rejected by the MTA. More →

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With L Shutdown Averted, Debate Over All Those Extra Buses and Bikes

(@sloaneklevin on Instagram)

Since Governor Cuomo announced last week that the MTA would scrap its total L-train shutdown in favor of a new plan involving the closure of just one tunnel at a time on nights and weekends, the mood has been a little bit celebratory and little bit WTF. Among other things, New Yorkers who had been ready to see their commutes descend into stygian chaos are now wondering what will happen to all those promised ferries, buses, and bike lines. Some still want ’em, others most definitely don’t.

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Kidnappers, Quacks, and Go-Go Boys in One of Jared Kushner’s Buildings

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Death! Destruction! Dutchmen! The history of one intersection in the East Village features murders, kidnappings, and a few famous names. Now the Spotted Owl Tavern occupies ground level at the northwest corner of Avenue A and 13th Street, the latest in a long line of bars at that location. There’s been a watering hole in that space (well, a saloon or maybe a bierpalast or a nightclub) for over 125 years, exempting, legally speaking, the unfortunate period between the 18th and 21st amendments.

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An ‘Orgy of Brutality’: Police Against Immigrants in the East Village

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

29 Avenue A, 1939-1941 New York City Department of Records.

The bullet tore through John Muller’s chest just above his left clavicle, fracturing the bone into small splinters that lacerated surrounding flesh and vein. The lead ball lodged in his neck between the trachea and the esophagus. His right temple was swollen and abloom in blackened bruises. Police officers had bludgeoned him, witnesses said, just outside his home at 29 Avenue A. But it was the gunshot, the coroner testified, that killed John Muller on July 11, 1857.

Muller died in the basement of what is now 33 Avenue A between Second and Third Streets. Today, the plot houses Joyful Nail Salon flush with clients reclined on taupe leatherette pedicure chairs. A sign outside advertises color gel and manicures. Just above, public housig apartments have long since replaced the original 19th century tenement building. But to peel past that lacquered exterior is to reveal the plot’s history long since erased. A history of the East Village when it was German-speaking Kleindeutschland with tenement houses lining Avenue A; of a city in turmoil in the summer of 1857; of a riot in the 17th ward; of a clash between police and a largely immigrant community; of a man shot dead.

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From Batters to Battallions: A Brooklyn Armory Sits On Baseball History

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Exterior of the armory today.

The 47th Regiment Armory on Marcy Avenue has loomed over its neighbors since 1883. The brick-layered building with crenelated turrets occupies an entire block, bounded by Marcy Avenue to the South, Harrison to the north, Heyward Street to the west and Lynch to the east. Up until 2011, when the federal government consolidated several regiments, the armory served as the drill hall for a branch of the New York National Guard.

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A Castle That Protected Soldiers Struggles to Do the Same For the Homeless

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Allen Ross lives in a castle, but it feels more like purgatory.

Ross is diabetic, arthritic and schizophrenic and had to turn to the Bedford Atlantic Armory Men’s Assessment Shelter when he could no longer pay his rent. He’s spending his day passing time in the shadows of the turrets that tower four stories into the air above Crown Heights. Like the rest of the residents of the 124-year-old edifice that has been a shelter since 1983, Ross is in the assessment phase of the New York City shelter system, meaning he is waiting to be placed in long-term housing. The typical stay at Bed-Atlantic lasts 21 days.

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America’s Oldest Surviving Mosque Is in Williamsburg

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

104 Powers Street. (Photo: Zuha Siddiqui)

There’s a building at 104 Powers Street in Williamsburg, an inconspicuous row house just around the corner from the rooftop bars, art galleries and coffee shops near the Lorimer L stop on Metropolitan Avenue. White clapboard slats, sloping roof. Look closer, and there’s a discreet, white turret topped with a crescent. If no one had pointed it out, you wouldn’t know you were walking past North America’s oldest surviving mosque. More →

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An East Williamsburg Church Has Been Home to Germans, Latinos, and Now Uncertainty

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Rev. Rafael Perez leads a prayer at the St. Nicholas Roman Catholic Church on Dec. 9, 2018.

On a recent Sunday, right after Spanish-language services, an eight-piece mariachi band streamed into the St. Nicholas Catholic Church in East Williamsburg. Guitars and trumpets blended together in a musical homage to the Virgin of Guadalupe, a venerated figure who symbolizes devotion throughout the Latino community. Just below in the main hall, a feast was on the tables and flowers, flags and banners surrounded the virgin’s likeness.

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A Chinatown Church Carries the Flame For a Forgotten Greek Community

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Greek Orthodox worshippers gathered on Dec. 3 to hear Archbishop Demetrios of America speak for the Feast Day of Saint Barbara at the eponymous St. Barbara Greek Orthodox church. The church was named for a martyr whose faith was seen to be unparalleled. Saint Barbara is said to have been tortured through the night for her Christian beliefs, and to honor this the visitors and parishioners at Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox church chanted in unison until the candles lit by the idols at the doors of the sanctuary had all burnt out and the sun cast its first wan fingers of light against the window panes.

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