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Brooklyn Subway Stations Won’t Get WiFi For Another Year

(Photo: Natalie Rinn)

(Photo: Natalie Rinn)

Governor Cuomo — fresh off of plugging his new book — announced today that 40 more NYC subway stations have been equipped with wifi, bringing the grand total to 76. Unfortunately for the iPhone-happy denizens of Brooklyn, none of those stations are in their borough, and it’ll be at least another year till G train riders can live the dream of streaming Jonathan Toubin’s groovy new Halloween mix in lieu of listening to the pitter-patter of track rats. (Hey, in the meantime you can always grin and bear that album U2 put onto your iTunes.)
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With Homelessness Up, Bowery Mission Is in ‘Urgent Need’ of Pantry Items

(Photo: Ilyse Liffreing)

(Photo: Ilyse Liffreing)

The pantry at The Bowery Mission is bleakly bare. Where once enough food was stored to fill up the small shopping carts of the homeless who came in looking for comfort every two weeks, now the organization has to suggest its members come only once a month. It’s in “urgent need” of more food.
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$3.5 Million Will Create Jobs, Curb Garbage Juice

Rabbi Niederman speaks at Council Member Stephen Levin's press conference today in Williamsburg (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Rabbi Niederman speaks at Council Member Stephen Levin’s press conference today in Williamsburg (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Today in South Williamsburg, Council Member Stephen Levin announced the allocation of new city funding for cleanup efforts across the city. The program– the City’s Council $3.5 million Cleanup NYC Initiative– aims to install better public trash bins and beautify public spaces and streets while contributing to a generally more, er, sanitized New York City. Because apparently having streets in Williamsburg and Greenpoint that the Mayor’s Office rated 83 percent to 96.6 percent “acceptable” is nowhere near clean enough.
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Villagers Ask Cops to Do Something About Cyclists and Squatters

Lt. Patrick Ferguson (Photo: Mary Reinholz)

Lt. Patrick Ferguson (Photo: Mary Reinholz)

After a summer recess, the Ninth Precinct’s community council resumed its monthly meetings last night, drawing a large turnout of locals to the East Fifth Street station house. Deputy Inspector Peter J. Venice announced that crime in his precinct was down overall by 4 percent with declines in all categories except felony assault during the last 28 days. But residents still griped about everything from loud music at rooftop ragers to rats scurrying out of “filthy” apartment buildings.
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Norman Siegel Wants ‘Lots of Reform in the NYPD,’ But Is OK With Stop-and-Frisk

Norman Siegel and listeners. (Photo: Mary Reinholz)

Norman Siegel and listeners. (Photo: Mary Reinholz)

Insisting he is not “anti-cop,” only “anti-bad cop,” civil liberties lawyer Norman Siegel last night called for the creation of a New York State prosecutor to investigate police misconduct in the wake of the chokehold death of Eric Garner. At a community forum at St. John’s Lutheran Church in the West Village, he also recommended that training for cadets be extended from six months to a year.
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‘We Have the Bourgie-ness’: An Early Look Inside Westside Market’s Eastside Debut

The newest Westside Market prepares to open in the East Village (Photo: Nicole Disser)

The newest Westside Market prepares to open in the East Village (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Last week, a Bloomberg Intelligence report concluded that Whole Foods was now one of the city’s best budget grocery options—news that hardened New Yorkers might greet with a horrified howl. Not George Zoitas.
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Local Ukrainians Talk Sanctions, Ceasefire, and NATO Aid That May Not Do Enough

(Photo:)

Protest attendee dons a Ukrainian flag at Sunday’s gathering. (Photo: Jasmine Lee)

Iryna Vitkovska says NATO’s involvement in Ukraine’s conflict with Russia will not bring peace to her country. “They should have looked at it a long time ago, and not just waking up right now when it’s too late,” said the 27-year-old bartender of the Sly Fox. The bar is located on the ground floor of the Ukrainian National Home in the East Village, next to a sidewalk memorial for Ukrainians who’ve died in ongoing clashes with pro-Russian separatists.
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Cleaner Streets, But Dirty Needles Are Still a Cause for Concern

(Photo: Amy Lombard)

(Photo: Amy Lombard)

It was dark by the time members of the East Village walkabout group entered Tompkins Square Park, carrying plastic bags containing clean syringes, sterilized cookers and tourniquets, condoms, lubricants and dental dams.
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We’ll Drink (and Eat) to This: Firehouse Becoming a Cultural Center

(Photos courtesy of)

(Photos courtesy of NTHCCC)

In the 1970s, the City of New York flirted with bankruptcy and the storefronts on Bedford Avenue stood empty. Now, those same storefronts are buzzing and a long-running campaign to establish a community center in a storied Northside building aims to honor the memory of those who made that rejuvenation possible—and continue their good work.

The Northside Town Hall and Community Center (NTHCCC) will, once it’s completed, function as a social, cultural and political hub for the Williamsburg-Greenpoint community. And, crucially, it will enact this role from Engine 212, a defunct firehouse on Wythe Avenue that played a central role in the neighborhood’s history.

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Chinatown Buses Face Regulation and Riled-Up Residents

Passengers wait for their ride (photo courtesy of "Save Our Streets")

Passengers wait for their ride (photo courtesy of Save LES Streets)

After a two-year grace period, the city is finally moving to enforce legislation that aims to regulate the thriving (and some would say infuriating) Chinatown bus industry, in the hopes of mitigating the “wild west” atmosphere that the throng of ludicrously cheap long-haul carriers have introduced to the affected downtown zones.
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