Arts + Culture

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Tribeca Launches a TV Festival With Louis C.K., Amy Sedaris and a Will & Grace Reunion

The people who used to brag about not owning a TV set are the same ones who now complain that there are too many shows– or so it was observed on a recent episode of Difficult People. Obviously, orange is the new black and the small screen is the new big screen, but up until a few years ago, New York City didn’t have a festival dedicated to what used to be called the idiot box. That changed in 2013, when we finally got a version of Los Angeles’s PaleyFest. That returns next month with some free screenings of shows like The Mindy Project and Fuller House. And now the folks behind the Tribeca Film Festival have announced a Tribeca TV Festival, also coming next month.

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Artists and Latex Lovers Whip Out Their Pens at Kink ‘n’ Draw

Instagram: LatexBaroness.

Those in attendance at the most recent “Kink ‘n’ Draw” event got to feast their “lustful and perverted eyes” on latex-clad live models as they posed in erotic tableaux carefully designed by one of our favorite New York characters, fetishwear entrepreneur and kink advocate the Baroness.

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East Village Community Gardens to Host Screenings of National Security Docs

Does government surveillance really get your goat? (To be honest I have never really understood that expression but I am just going to run with it.) Is your ideal evening spent watching documentaries on the deep state? If so, then you’re in luck.

In a new film fest running today through Aug. 5 — ominously titled “Spy vs. Us” — the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space (MoRUS) in the East Village takes on national security and the surveillance state. Even better, like last year’s MoRUS-sponsored film and theater festivals, this year’s festival screenings will occur in the lovely environs of several community gardens. Tonight’s opening screening takes place in the roof garden of Alphabet City’s fabled Umbrella House.

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Great Jones Cafe Reopens: ‘Reports of Our Demise Were Greatly Exaggerated’

We reported last week that beloved Cajun eatery and longtime Bowery hangout Great Jones Cafe was temporarily shutting down — and, according to cryptic information from an employee, would or would not return. Fearing that the Great Jones had become yet the latest victim of rising rents, New Yorkers swarmed onto social media to pay their respects and lament the loss of a neighborhood institution that has served as an indispensable cultural hub for local artists, musicians, and writers — some of whom, like Basquiat, have become quite famous.

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Legendary Art Duo McDermott & McGough Are Building an ‘Oscar Wilde Temple’

McDermott & McGough, “Oscar Wilde in Prison, 1895 (MMXVII)” (detail), 2017. Oil and gold leaf on linen. Courtesy of the artists.

Legendary New York art team McDermott & McGough — known, among other things, for spending 15 years living in the East Village while dressed as top hat-wearing Victorian gentlemen — are back with an ambitious new project to be unveiled at The Church of the Village this September.

The new art installation combines several of the artists’ motifs and preoccupations — the Victorian era, Ireland, gay culture, LGBT rights, time — in a giant homage to Oscar Wilde, the turn-of-the-century Anglo-Irish writer and bon-vivant famously condemned to prison for refusing to hide his sexuality.

The Oscar Wilde Temple “combines painting, sculpture, and site specific elements in a functioning environment that recalls the beautiful and provocative sensuousness of the Aesthetic Movement [that] Wilde championed,” according to a press release. It will transform The Church of the Village‘s chapel into a shrine to Wilde. In the center will be a four-foot statue of Wilde in the manner of a religious icon. On the walls will be paintings in the style of the Stations of the Cross, but instead of depicting Christ’s persecution they will illustrate Wilde’s journey from arrest to incarceration.

Peter McGough and David McDermott — who, after their East Village days, threw elaborate parties in the Williamsburg bank building where they resided — evidently first began discussing the idea of the Oscar Wilde Temple more than 20 years ago. In keeping with the duo’s fondness for “time experiments,” the Temple will painstakingly replicate the aesthetics and atmosphere of Victorian England through the use of “specially made fabric wall coverings, architectural and decorative details, furnishings and lighting.”

The Temple will also include a secondary altar conceived as a shrine to those struggling with or killed by AIDS, as well as a series of portraits by McDermott & McGough of homophobia “martyrs,” such as Harvey Milk and Alan Turing, and lesser-known victims of AIDS or homophobia including Sakia Gunn, a teenage African-American lesbian stabbed in Newark in 2003, and two figures from The Church of the Village’s own history — Rev. Paul M. Abels and Rev. C. Edward Egan, ministers forced out for being gay.

Sponsored by The Church of the Village and the New York LGBT Center, the Temple will also be available to rent for weddings, memorial services, and other private functions, with the proceeds benefiting the LGBT Center.

The installation will run concurrently with “I’ve Seen the Future and I’m Not Going,” a McDermott & McGough retrospective opening at the Dallas Contemporary in Texas on October 1st.

The installation will be open Sept. 11th through Dec. 2nd at The Church of the Village at 201 W. 13th St. at 7th Ave., viewable Tuesdays through Saturdays from noon – 7:00 pm.

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Alejandro Jodorowsky On Poetry, Psychomagic, and How to Get Free of Trump

Endless Poetry

When surrealist auteur Alejandro Jodorowsky makes a rare trip to New York City— to promote his new autobiographical film, Endless Poetry— you know it’s an occasion. During a MoMA discussion on Wednesday, the spry 88-year-old gave a tarot reading to Daniel Craig; the next evening on the Bowery, there was a party celebrating the release of the film’s soundtrack, composed by Alejandro’s son Adan Jodorowsky, who also stars in it.

Clearly, multi-talentedness runs in the family. Like his 37-year-old son, the elder Jodorowsky has composed music for films in which he has also acted— namely his cult masterpieces, El Topo and The Holy Mountain. At various times, he’s been a circus clown, a puppeteer, a mime, a novelist, a comic book artist, and a practitioner of his own brand of “shamanic psychotherapy,” called psychomagic.

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George Clinton On His Role in Flying Lotus’s Kuso: ‘I Thought I Was On Drugs Again’

Flying Lotus with mic, George Clinton in hat. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

We warned you that Flying Lotus’s debut feature, Kuso, would be one of the grossest, weirdest movies in recent memory. Sure enough, after last night’s Rooftop Films screening an audience member had just one question for FlyLo.

Why?”

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DIY Venue Silent Barn Opens Up Its Books, Wants to Be ‘Not in a State of Panic’

Silent Barn’s is releasing their financials to anyone who wants to read.

Beloved Bushwick DIY venue/housing cooperative/artist colony Silent Barn has been in a bit of a financial bind of late. The popular concert venue, which also functions as an art collective of sorts, has struggled to navigate a coldly indifferent capitalist world, and Silent Barn — technically a for-profit LLC but operating more or less as a non-profit and in the process of transitioning to one — has put out an urgent call for donations as well as paid members.

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Alex Ross Perry On His ‘Very Personal,’ ‘Very Local’ New Film, Golden Exits

Alex Ross Perry (middle) and cinematographer Sean Price Williams (right).

“There’s no one here that we accidentally filmed in one of the crowd scenes, is there?” Alex Ross Perry quipped after a screening of his latest movie– his third to play at BAMcinemaFest over the years. “Because this is the screening where we would have to deal with that.”

Golden Exits is a “very local movie,” the 32-year-old director had noted while introducing the film Saturday night. Unlike Listen Up Philip and Queen of Earth, which were shot partly outside of the city, this one occurs almost entirely in brownstone Brooklyn, not far from BAM— with the notable exception of a scene at Anthology Film Archives in the East Village.

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Wettest, Wildest Looks From the Coney Island Mermaid Parade

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

Photos: Kasper van Laarhoven

It was mermaid time in Coney Island on Saturday, as New Yorkers once again paraded past the Cyclone and Nathan’s in everything from elaborate sea-creature costumes to, well, basically nothing. Despite a rainy start, the 35th annual Mermaid Parade was as merry as ever, with many a parader having cleverly turned their transparent umbrella into a floating jellyfish. Click through our slideshow to see the pageantry that, as the parade’s website puts it, “celebrates ancient mythology and honky-tonk rituals of the seaside.”

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How the Hare Krishna Movement Started 51 Years Ago in the East Village

A kirtan (collective chanting of the Hare Krishna mantra) at Washington Square Park.(© Kasper van Laarhoven)

If you’ve ever been to Union Square, you’ve seen them: They chant, drum; sometimes they even give you a free copy of their scripture. Hare Krishnas are often shrugged off as an urban oddity on par with clipboard people, but what lies behind those orange robes and endless mantras?

This Friday, June 16, Hare Krishna! The Mantra, the Movement and the Swami Who Started It will premiere at Village East Cinema. The documentary tells the story of Srila Prabhupada, a disheveled 70-year-old Hindu who boarded a freighter to the U.S. in August 1965 with little more than three self-translated religious texts and instructions from his guru to “offer spiritual wisdom to the people of the world.”

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This Woman Is Lying in a Coffin For 24 Hours to Protest the Repeal of Obamacare

(Photo: Shannon Barbour)

For the next 24 long, hot hours Rosary Solimanto will lie lifeless in a coffin outside of the offices of senators Kirsten Gellibrand and Chuck Schumer, to protest the “fast tracking” of the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

“If I don’t get proper medical care in the near future, that coffin’s going to be for real,” Solimanto said during an interview explaining why she was planning the performance protest.

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