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4 Exciting Artists We Discovered at the Clio Art ‘Anti-Fair’

“Fight Like a Girl,” 2019, by Yumiko Hirokawa (Courtesy of Yumiko Hirokawa)

Clio Art Fair came to Chelsea this past weekend, bringing with it 54 artists from over 20 different countries and from all over the United States. The self-styled “anti-fair” catering to independent artists focuses on moving away from everything that sucks about traditional art fairs (like how you have to basically be famous already to show your work there). More →

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NYC’S First ‘Nut-Milk Bar’ Milks Nut Puns For All They’re Worth

(Photos: Jae Thomas)

Nolita cafe Tulo House wants to know: “Did you nut today?”

The hashtag-worthy slogan immortalized by a bright blue neon sign (although, if your mom follows you on Instagram, maybe don’t post it) refers to the health spot’s homemade dairy-alternative milks. The self-proclaimed “first fresh nut-milk bar” in the city, Tulo House opened its doors last week. More →

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Canary Club Jazzes Up The Lower East Side

(photo: Heidi’s Bridge)

While you still can’t (legally) drink on the street, the Lower East Side is about to feel a little more like New Orleans now that it has Canary Club. The Broome Street restaurant, bar, and live music spot opened its doors this week, serving up French Creole-inspired dishes, creative cocktails, and tunes ranging from jazz to disco. More →

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Performance Picks: MCR Burlesque and Indoor-Outdoor Comedy

THURSDAY

Not Straight Not White
Thursday, October 10 at 132 W 21st Street, 7 pm: FREE

At this trio show, audiences get the best of three worlds. There’s photography, there’s sculpture, and there’s performance, and it’s all created by young artists (Patrick Arias, Jinyong Choi, and Garrett Allen) who are, as the title suggests, neither straight nor white. To those deeply enmeshed in inclusive, queer, nightlife-y worlds, this may not seem like the most revolutionary thing (though I’d advise taking a closer look at those scenes to see how consistently diverse they really are), but recall that it was a mere two days ago that the Supreme Court was contemplating queer and trans people’s right to hold a job without the constant fear of being fired simply for who they are. Not Straight Not White acknowledges these tumultuous times and attempts to imagine a better future, one where the marginalized take back the power.

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The Comic Geniuses Behind ‘On Cinema’ Have an Unmade Murder Mystery Lying Around Somewhere

Tim Heidecker and Gregg Turkington’s Adult Swim show, On Cinema at the Cinema, has birthed so many wacky offshoots– a podcast! a spinoff show! a rock band and EDM remix! Oscar specials! live tours! Twitter battles! fan recaps!– that it’s hard to believe its creators haven’t explored every possible outlet for their shtick, which can best be described as Siskel and Ebert on crack (or rather, on Dr. San’s Nutritional Vaping Technology). But last night, after the opening of their first feature film, they revealed that the beginnings of an earlier On Cinema movie are lying around somewhere. More →

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‘The Booksellers’: A Musty-See Documentary About Old Books

I remember the moment I almost emptied my bank account at the New York Antiquarian Book Fair. The object of temptation: a poster advertising the reopening of the New St. Mark’s Baths, the notorious gay bathhouse that was ultimately shut down by Ed Koch during the 1980s AIDS scare. Sci-fi illustrator Boris Vallejo’s artwork depicted a He-Man type riding a horned beast, flanked by ripped space aliens. It was like a Miles Davis cover if Bitches Brew was an advertisement for pre-Giuliani orgy dens, and I had to have it. More →

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Art This Week: Pastels, Flowers, and Queer Abstraction

(image via Equity Gallery / Facebook)

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
Opening Wednesday, October 9 at Equity Gallery, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through November 2.

There are plenty of exhibitions nowadays that spotlight creations by queer artists of present and past, but this show at Equity Gallery organized by critics and curators Christopher Stout and Eric Sutphin narrows its focus even more to zero in on what they call “queer abstraction.” Deeming the exhibition a “visual essay,” it (and the six artists participating) aims to explore how the subgenre has been showcased both locally and abroad, and the power (or lack thereof) of abstract art that doesn’t have an overt political statement to it.

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