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Pizza, Beer and Bongs Coming to Graham Avenue

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(Photo: Anthony Pappalardo)

 

If you live off the Graham stop you’re either a Tony’s or Carmine’s pizza loyalist. But Carmine’s closed for renovations on January 1 so it could work on a full bar and pizzeria next door — one that’s aimed to cater to New York sports fans and is sure to be heavy on Yankees ephemera if the decor at Carmine’s is any indicator. Though the plans for Carmine’s Sports Bar were announced early last year and the banner above the entrance way still states a Fall 2013 opening, the space is still largely a work in progress.
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Sasheer Zamata’s Girls Tour; Video of 285 Kent’s Last Shows

Street drum

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

Watch Sasheer Zamata, who made her SNL debut Saturday, give a Girls tour of Greenpoint. [NY Observer]

Speaking of Girls, Lena Dunham is defending Vogue against Jezebel, which stirred up some controversy by publishing unretrouched photos from her recent shoot with the mag: “Vogue isn’t the place that we go to look at realistic women, Vogue is the place that we go to look at beautiful clothes and fancy places and escapism and so I feel like if the story reflects me and I happen to be wearing a beautiful Prada dress and surrounded by beautiful men and dogs, what’s the problem?” [Today]

During the final show at 285 Kent, Fucked Up’s lead singer shared a fond memory: “Last time we played here it was like a million degrees, and I vomited outside.” [NY Times]
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This Week: Explore Chinatown On Screen, Or Hit the Road With David Lynch

Whether you see it as a never-ending pedestrian traffic jam, a place to buy knock-off bags and cheap grub, or simply a spectacle to behold, Chinatown is more than meets the eye. Running at Anthology Film Archives from January 24 to 26 in celebration of the Chinese New Year, “We Landed/ I Was Born/ Passing By: New York’s Chinatown On Screen” is a five-part screening series inspired by the work of 1960s poet Frances Chung. Through documentaries, archival footage, home videos, literary readings, photography, and performance, you’ll learn about a Chinatown full of culture, struggle, and community.
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Ready For a Shamanic Odyssey? This Film About Ayahuasca Should Do the Trick

Rak Razam’s ayahuasca-themed film, Aya: Awakenings, was scheduled to premiere at 7 p.m. last night, but at 7:20 p.m., people were still filing into Anthology Film Archives. The audience members, who were all chatting with one another, were operating on their own time. As one woman squeezed her way through the narrow aisle, she stopped to ask a fellow attendee, “Didn’t we meet at the yoga retreat?”
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The 7 Train Is Closing For 22 Weekends and LICers are NOT On Board

Jimmy Van Bremer addresses crowd. (Photo: Natalie Shure)

Jimmy Van Bremer addresses crowd. (Photo: Natalie Shure)

For many of this morning’s seventy-odd demonstrators clumped outside of Dorian Cafe in Long Island City, the MTA’s latest onslaught of subway service disruptions is a life-altering blow. The 7 Train, which connects the Queens neighborhood to Manhattan, is slated for 22 full weekends of closure in 2014. Protesters say this leaves their community stranded, and that the MTA has ignored their concerns.
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Stanley Cohen Defends Himself One Month, Bin Laden’s Son-in-Law the Next

(Photo: Melvin Felix)

(Photo: Melvin Felix)

The judge was a little late getting to his 13th-floor courtroom in lower Manhattan, so Stanley L. Cohen, the controversial criminal defense lawyer from Avenue D, took a seat outside, resplendent in an impeccably tailored pinstriped suit. His graying ponytail was pulled back in a discreet bun.

Cohen, known for taking “pariah cases” like those espoused by the late civil liberties icon William Kunstler, was not at 500 Pearl Street to represent his own unpopular clients, who have included squatters, hackers, a political leader of Hamas, and accused terrorists such as Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, a son-in-law of Osama bin Laden who was arraigned last year across the street in another federal building on charges of conspiring to kill Americans.
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Alex Da Corte Sees the World Through a Piss-Filled Malt Liquor Bottle

Alex Da Corte, "April Fools," 2014: Rubber, anodized metal frames, VCT tile, wood, foam, garland, ceramic Hershey Kiss, latex witch nose, artificial mushroom, Coca-Cola can, Plexiglas 60.5 x 49 x 64 inches.

Alex Da Corte, “April Fools,” 2014: Rubber, anodized metal frames, VCT tile, wood, foam, garland, ceramic Hershey Kiss, latex witch nose, artificial mushroom, Coca-Cola can, Plexiglas 60.5 x 49 x 64 inches.

“Does the food we eat or the way we clean our toilet reflect if we’re obsessive compulsive or if we’re Virgos?” asked Alex Da Corte yesterday evening outside of American Contemporary gallery in the East Village. These are some of the questions Da Corte and five other artists address in “The Cardboard Lover,” which opened at said gallery yesterday evening. In a broader sense, the show explores the concept of “zaniness” as it applies to modern methods of production and consumerism. “It’s considering ways in which we organize domestic space and how it reflects if we’re cute or funny or serious,” Da Corte said.
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