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Sesame Street Drag, Disabled Comedians, and More Performance Picks

Asia Gagnon’s ‘The Kind of Thing You Don’t Talk About’ at SipFest

SipFest
Now through March 14 at Wild Project, various times, various prices

The nature of live theater is that anything can happen at any time. Sometimes this is good, but not always. Spaceman, a high-tech play from Loading Dock Theater about a woman astronaut’s journey to Mars, was supposed to have a run at Wild Project currently, but had to be canceled due to an injury sustained by the lead performer. However, the venue will not be empty. A last-minute festival of original performance works by women and queer artists called Sipfest will run at the Lower East Side venue in its stead. There, you’ll find a solo show digging into how we discuss sexual assault, drag performances, femme ballads, a play inspired by the fanfiction epic My Immortal, and more. More →

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Bowie Mania Continues With Ziggy Cocktails and Record Store Day Releases

From “David Bowie is” at Brooklyn Museum. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

The opening of the mammoth “David Bowie is” exhibit last week at the Brooklyn Museum left a lot of people nostalgic for the late Starman. Lucky for all the Ziggy Stardust acolytes out there, the Bowie love continues with a slew of new record releases in April and a batch of themed cocktails at Crown Heights bar and restaurant. So take your protein pills, put your helmet on and let the Bowie mania begin.

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Week in Film: Los Sures, Surrealist Bloodcore, and Freedom Summer Sings the Blues


Los Sures
Friday December 9, 7 pm to 10 pm at Dobbin Street: $8 to $10 

Dobbin St. is a new “luxury event space” that occasionally throws non-luxury events. For Halloween, they hosted a screening of Suspiria and went all out, washing the space in Dario Argento’s signature evil-pink light and amassing a band to do the live score. They even threw in some popcorn, a bar, and prep school-style beds for good measure.

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Week in Film: Punk Rock’s Golden Daddy and ‘Ludicrous’ Janis Joplin Remixes


Danny Says
Friday September 30 through Thursday October 6 at IFC Center: $14

Danny Fields was the music manager “at the pulse of the underground,” the man behind the best rock n’ roll to come out of the ’70s New York City scene and actually some of the most influential rock of all time. Iggy Pop, Lou Reed, and the Ramones were just a few of his associated acts and though all of this stuff is standard by now, back in Danny’s glory days it was nothing short of insanity.

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Week in Film: The Jazz Loft, a New Indie Theater, and More


The Jazz Loft According to Eugene W. Smith
Friday September 23 through Wednesday September 28 at the Metrograph: $15

In this film about a loft that from 1957 to 1965 drew some of the best musicians of its time to a nondescript location in the city’s Flower District, you might get the feeling that you’ve been to a place sort of like this before. Like almost everything cool in America, the DIY venues we frequent today have their roots in jazz, specifically the underground spots of yesteryear where the music could be experienced in its natural state.

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Inside the Vale of Cashmere, a Bucolic Cruising Spot Threatened By ‘Restoration’

"Untitled" (from the series In The Vale of Cashmere), Thomas Roma 2011

“Untitled” (from the series In The Vale of Cashmere), Thomas Roma 2011

Like many Brooklynites, Prospect Park is my go-to, but the awesomely named Vale of Cashmere– a relatively isolated area on the east side of the park and the subject of photographer Thomas Roma’s new book– didn’t sound familiar at all. To outsider eyes like mine, the Vale (depending on your taste) is either a beautifully wild or pitifully neglected patch of land, overgrown with disobedient trees and untamed plants, at the center of which there’s a once-elegant fountain clogged with weeds and fetid puddles from years of neglect. Park staff have planted shrubs and flowers there too, lending the area a rotting romanticism.

But the Vale has another history: it’s long been a cruising spot for gay men, but especially gay men of color. Until recently it was considered an open secret, and one that many park powerfuls have decided not to engage, despite demands from elsewhere that they do so (in various ways). While Roma’s series is ultimately a personal exploration of friendship and loss, it’s nearly impossible to unravel his images from questions about what kind of impact a looming project will have on the community that has made this space its own.

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A DIY Space Where ‘People of Color Have Empowerment’ Gets Ready For Next Act

Winston Scarlett: curator of Slackgaze and founder of Nola Darling (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Winston Scarlett: curator of Slackgaze and founder of Nola Darling (Photo: Nicole Disser)

For the city’s DIY scene, the year 2014 was anything but static– openings, closings, you know the drill. And while one little venue might seem like it’s simply joining the list of short-lived venues and tragic casualties, in all probability, Nola Darling is just getting started.

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Week in Film: a Flashy Smuggler Jaunt and Trippy Danish Sci-Fi

It was a bad week for us film nerds in NYC with word emerging that Sunshine Cinema will likely be sold to developers. Such things do not bode well for the future of independent cinemas in the city, seeing as Sunshine is definitely one of the more mainstream of the downtown art house theaters and always seems to have sold out screenings during prime showtimes. Yikes. Well you can help us in our efforts to appease the cool-film deities by devoted prostration and abiding carefully by the following directions: a) pray silently over one Godard film, b) recite the lines along with a character from at least one Jarmusch movie and c) check out a weird film event (or two) this week. It’s very little to ask, really.

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Brooklyn Poet Wins A House In Detroit. Yep, A House.

Casey Rocheteau in 2013 (Photo: Thomas Sayers Ellis)

Casey Rocheteau in 2013 (Photo: Thomas Sayers Ellis)

When Brooklyn-based poet Casey Rocheteau first heard about Write A House Detroit, a unique writer-in-residence program that awards selected writers with a permanent home in Detroit, she didn’t know what to think. “I wasn’t necessarily convinced that I should apply right away,” she said. But when Airea D. Matthews , a Detroit-based poet, posted a status on Facebook encouraging other poets to apply to the program, Rocheteau says she was convinced. “I applied, of course, with no expectation of actually getting it,” she said. “I just thought it seemed like a really fantastic and interesting idea.”
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Now You Can Eat Ramen Burgers With 20 Of Your Closest Friends, at Berg’n

Inside Berg'n, Smorgasburg's latest endeavor. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Inside Berg’n, Smorgasburg’s latest endeavor. (Photo: Nicole Disser)

The grand opening of Berg’n is finally upon us. This Wednesday, Smorgasburg welcomes guests to its new Crown Heights beer garden and food court.
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