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With Protests on the Back Burner, Where Is the Black Chef Movement Headed?

(Photo courtesy of Turner Johnson)

As people took to the streets of New York City following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis back in May, members of the Black Chef Movement took to their kitchens to prepare healthy meals for the protesters on the movement’s frontlines. An initial Instagram post on June 3 asking for volunteers led to an organization of nearly 100 members and an Instagram following of more than 8,000. While the movement has been a success, it’s experiencing some growing pains now that its original mission is fading along with the protests. More →

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Photographer’s Avenger, Judge’s Nightmare: The Case of Copyright Lawyer Richard Liebowitz

(Photo courtesy of Richard Liebowitz)

In the five years his firm has been opened, Richard Liebowitz, a photographer turned attorney, has managed to file more than 2,500 copyright infringement cases. In that same period, he has earned another distinction: he has become the most frequently sanctioned lawyer in the Southern District of New York. 

Federal judges in the District and elsewhere, exasperated with the number of cases and Liebowitz’s alleged misconduct, have labeled him the “copyright troll.”  More →

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One of New York City’s Biggest Processors of Food Waste Is in Danger of Losing Its Home

The entrance of Big Reuse’s site in Queensbridge.

For the last few months, Big Reuse, a compost processing site in western Queens, has been fighting to try to stay on its current land. But at the end of the month, it may have to find a new place to process the roughly 1.7 million pounds of residential food scraps and park leaves it handles every year.  More →

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McSorley’s’ First Female Bartender Keeps Its Spirit Alive

Teresa Maher de la Haba.


McSorley’s Ale House hasn’t changed much in the last century: its floors are still lined with sawdust bought from the same Long Island-based family for the past 80 years, black-and-white photos line its walls containing centuries of history, and a centrally located iron fireplace still burns wood to keep it warm during the winter. But in 1994, Teresa Maher de la Haba became the first McSorley’s bartender with a soprano voice.  More →

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Fight Intensifies Over Exam That’s Said to Keep Black Students Out of NYC’s Elite High Schools

Members of PLACE staged a rally at City Hall in October to advocate for the SHSAT. (Photo: Jasmine Photo)

One month after Sierra Fraser participated in a demonstration against New York City’s high school admissions testing, she’s visibly distressed about the experience.

“It was rough,” the 18-year-old college freshman tells me over Zoom, her hair sitting atop her head in a tight bun and her voice quickly turning from quiet and composed to loud and frustrated. Sierra adjusts her glasses and looks up at the ceiling: “We were chanting ‘Black students matter,’ and they yelled back ‘All students matter.’ Their signs said ‘Education for all,’ but how can you say ‘Education for all’ and not support a more inclusive education system for Black and brown students?” More →

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The Bean Comes Back to Second Avenue, But When Will Its Customers Return?

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

A little over a year after it closed its doors, The Bean has reopened its Second Avenue location, bringing a neighborhood staple back to NYU students and other East Village locals. The coffee shop’s reopening on Nov. 18 was the result of a rent break brought on by the pandemic, but with a second wave of COVID-19 threatening to hit New York City, it remains to be seen how long the silver lining will gleam.  More →