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When a Genghis Khan Restaurant’s Opening Is Scuttled, Cook-at-Table Becomes Cook-at-Home

The Japanese dish known as Jingisukan, or Genghis Khan, takes its name from the legend that Mongol warriors cooked lamb over their helmets. At Dr. Clark, a new Hokkaido-inspired restaurant in Chinatown, the plan was for diners to cook their marinated lamb and vegetables at their tables, using cast-iron skillets resembling Genghis Khan’s helmet. But when the coronavirus shutdown scuttled the restaurant’s March 15 opening, the operators had to shelve the armored skillets and come up with another plan of attack. More →

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Getting Tested For Coronavirus Might Be Easier Than You Think

A Covid-19 testing site in Albany. (Air National Guard Photo by Technical Sergeant Jamie Spaulding)

Call New York’s COVID-19 hotline, suggested by the state Department of Health’s website as the way to get tested, and you might be told that people with mild symptoms should monitor their condition at home and, if it worsens, contact a healthcare provider for further suggestions.  More →

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Stripped-Down Sets, a Zoom Opera, and More Virtual Performance Picks

WEDNESDAY

Kings of the World
Wednesday, April 22 on Twitch, 9 pm: FREE ($10 suggested donation)

Big cities and nightlife go hand-in-hand, but when it comes to virtual shows, it doesn’t matter where you live. Drag king showcase Kings of the World knows that well, seeking to virtually spotlight kings from all over rather than just focusing on major metropolitan areas. Hosted by LA-based performer Mo B. Dick, the show does indeed have drag kings from practically every part of the world. There are acts from Ireland, India, Australia, Puerto Rico, Spain, DC, and more, illustrating the wide range of queer performers out there. And of course, NYC is represented, in the form of local Brooklyn performers Muscles Monty and Uncle Freak. A $10 suggested donation gets you acts from 20 kings, and that’s quite a deal indeed.

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During Pandemic, Buddhist Meditation Teaches More New Yorkers to Be ‘Adamantly Joyful’

Hector Marcel conducts a Zoom class. (Photo: Stephen McManus)

Lately, John Baker, a Buddhist meditation teacher based in Manhattan, has seen more participants show up to the virtual meditation class that he and his friend Ellen Banash started a year ago. Every morning on his computer screen, people, mostly over the age of 45, join him for an hour of sitting and walking meditation. More →

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Disney On Broadway? Support Your Local Indie Venues, Too

(Photo courtesy of The Rosemont)

It seemed, for a moment, that this week’s Disney on Broadway concert would not go on. A compensation dispute threatened the fundraiser for struggling entertainment workers, but after a public detente between the musicians union and Disney, the concert will be broadcast Friday night after all. With performers and entertainment workers facing unprecedented financial strain in the face of our city’s shuttering, it’s no surprise that all involved parties were moved to bury the hatchet.  More →

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A Strokes Sibling Says Meet Me in the Virtual Gallery

If you’re looking for something resembling your usual Thursday night gallery hop in these unusual times, sit back with your own box wine tonight as The Zero Experiment launches its new virtual gallery series. Tonight’s “opening” features the work of mixed media artist Pierre Fraiture, whose performance group Arts Elektra recently rocked Art Basel Miami with the help of his brother, Strokes bassist Nikolai Fraiture.

“Pierre is influenced by philosophy and will often find parts of poems, or worldly texts embedded in his work,” says Marina Dojchinov, founder of The Zero Experiment. His works in acrylic, oil, marker, pen, and fabric.

Fraiture will host tonight’s opening in his studio, from 6:30-8pm, giving housebound visitors a tour of his work. “In a traditional gallery opening, often the artist is inundated with people and the audience never gets the chance to ask questions,” says Dojchinov. “This fully interactive setting allows for an intimate conversation that they can really understand.”

The Zero Experiment was created by Dojchinov to support the arts community during the recent pandemic while helping local businesses stay afloat. “Each week we showcase a different artist, and a different charity to raise money for those affected by Covid-19. Through sales of art, we want to give back to those going through a hard time and create a global community.” This week will highlight the needs of Broadway Bound Kids, an organization that has made it its mission to “inspire and empower kids through the performing arts” but has struggled to keep operating in the shadow of the virus.

Future artists will include Jessica Maffia, whose art has been featured by Childish Gambino; fashion photographer and former America’s Next Top Model judge Udo Spritqnbarth; and Eddy Bogaert, who just held an Armory Week show right before the state lockdown went into place. The Zero Experiment’s artists will be announced the week of and you can RSVP here to follow the listings.

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Virtual Performance Picks: Theater from the Archives and Actual Bedroom Pop

THURSDAY

Theresa Buchheister and Ryan William Downey in Sleeping Car Porters
(photo: Walter Wlodarczyk)

Sleeping Car Porters
Thursday, April 16 at The Brick on YouTube, 8 pm: FREE (donation suggested)

The thing typically said about live theater is that it’s ephemeral. It happens for a certain amount of time, and then it’s gone. But in the wake of the pandemic, that’s starting to somewhat change. Many venues are combing through their archives, offering viewers the chance to stream filmed versions of shows that have since closed. The Brick in Williamsburg is the latest to do so, starting Thursday with their experimental, acclaimed, Western-ish play Sleeping Car Porters. Sure, it won’t be quite the same as being in the room with a group of performers, but we have to take what we can get, and the chance to see theater after it happened IRL shouldn’t be underestimated.

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