news

No Comments

New York Workers and Scholars in Limbo Abroad as Trump Suspends Visas

The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement office at JFK. (Photo: noway on Flickr)

Soon after Yukti visited India in February to get her H-1B visa stamp, American consulates around the world shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. Since then, the 28-year-old New Yorker hasn’t had a good night’s sleep and she has lost seven pounds. Over the past four months, she has delayed her return flight to the US four times, called the consulate in Mumbai daily until almost every phone receptionist knows her full name, and pleaded her case to no avail. Now, thanks to President Trump’s latest visa suspension order, which bans foreign workers with no H1-B visa stamps from entering the US, she is looking at another six months of unpaid leave from the Manhattan bank where she worked, while stranded in India. More →

No Comments

Behind Closed Gates, Brooklyn Community Gardens Continue to Plant Seeds of Change

(Photos: Marialexa Kavanaugh)

On the corner of Hancock St. and Marcus Garvey Blvd. is a small patch of earth called the Hancock T&T Community Garden. A wooden sign protrudes from behind its fence, displaying portraits of iconic Black change-makers like Angela Davis, Malcolm X and Frederick Douglass. In large, bold letters are the words “The Gateway To The Ancestors,” which hang above these lines. More →

No Comments

Can New York’s Dog Walkers Dig Themselves Out of a Hole?

Nicholas Rodriguez of Doors & Dawgs.

Nicholas Rodriguez was a doorman concierge before starting Doors & Dawgs in 2014. After seeing local dog walkers pick up countless furry clients at his building, Rodriguez decided to start his own business based in Tribeca and Battery Park City. Initially his ideal way to pay for school, the dogs made him so happy that he made it a full-time profession. More →

No Comments

New Yorkers Flock Back to Restaurants as Outdoor Dining Springs Up Everywhere

Drivers or pedestrians who passed by Second Avenue between 48th and 49th Streets couldn’t help but notice the balloons where cars used to park. “Welcome back to outdoor dining,” read a colorful sign belonging to Barnacho, a Mexican restaurant. Behind the balloons, there were six tables on the asphalt where customers will be seated, in addition to seven tables occupying the sidewalk. Welcome to phase two of New York’s reopening. More →

No Comments

Arcade Project Pushes For ‘Real Change’ During the Art World’s Moment of Reckoning

M. Charlene Stevens (Photo: Ruben Natal-San Miguel)

As protests for racial justice continue, the art world has responded by featuring the work of black artists and exalting the influence of the Black Lives Matter movement on the art industry. Almost overnight, Twitter and Instagram has become flooded with lists of black galleries, black artists, and black musicians whose projects you can support. However, one black art dealer and critic, M. Charlene Stevens, remains suspicious. More →

No Comments

Remember the Democratic Debates? This Theater Group Thinks You Should

Katie Palmer and Paul Bedard, Feb. 2020 (Photo: Luana Harumi)

Between the pandemic, economic uncertainty, and civil unrest, it might be easy to forget that this is an election year, and the New York Democratic primary takes place Tuesday. If you need to refresh your memory with some of the events that lead to Joe Biden being the party’s last remaining presidential candidate, you can count on Theater In Asylum. Well, kind of. More →

No Comments

City Council Committee Passes POST Act, Bringing Oversight to NYPD Surveillance

On Thursday morning, the New York City Council’s Committee on Public Safety passed the POST Act, a bill that creates civilian review of the NYPD’s wide-ranging digital surveillance.

The POST Act, which passed 12-1, requires the NYPD to publicly report and describe which surveillance techniques it uses, guidelines and policies surrounding the use of that technology, and what will happen with the data collected from digital surveillance.  More →