(image via Babycastles / Facebook)

(image via Babycastles / Facebook)

Crash Report
Opening Monday December 12 at Babycastles, 6 pm to 11 pm. On view through December 18. 

Babycastles, which recently scored nonprofit status, presents this showcase of work by Parsons students in the Design & Technology program. The creators have specifically crafted a variety of video game art as well as new and experimental ways to experience and play video games, drawing from “folk games,” the old-school arcade aesthetic, and the idea of games as social interactions. Babycastles is no stranger to this sort of boundary-pushing video game art– just recently we’ve profiled shows they’ve done featuring games conjuring feelings of social anxiety, mystical games about Tarot cards, witches, mental health, and more. The games in Crash Report appear to run the gamut, from quests to build “the ultimate sandwich” or find the biggest sword in the land to a dreamlike experience about a boat at sea. And in Luis Gerardo Huiza Blanco’s piece Firewall, you play “a hacker tasked with retrieving information from a corrupt, brutal government.” …Too soon? In addition to the all-ages opening reception, the show also features a “not quite closing party” on Friday night and a day of artist talks on Sunday afternoon.

(photo via rolando vega is the chickinman / Facebook)

(photo via rolando vega is the chickinman / Facebook)

Rolando Vega
Opening Tuesday December 13 at The Footlight, 6 pm to 8 pm. 

Ridgewood bar and venue The Footlight, which features local bands as well as fitness and yoga classes, will now be turning their main room into a gallery space of sorts beginning this Tuesday. Throughout the winter season, the space will showcase the work of colorful NYC-based artist Rolando Vega. The East Village-based street artist is also known as “The Chickinman,” and can usually be found sporting complex and slightly terrifying costume creations, incorporating items like leis, Barbie dolls, spikes, face paint, and rainbows. Recently photographed by The New York Times for his elaborate Easter costume with plastic eggs and “sea creature legs,” Vega’s creative output also extends beyond his own body. The work on view at The Footlight appears to be mostly 2D patchwork creations, containing the same vibrantly colorful, jagged elements as his costumes. Vega and his son Henry will be present at the opening tomorrow night for a meet-and-greet, and any work purchased at the opening will come with a complimentary glass of champagne.

(flyer via Lucky / Facebook)

(flyer via Lucky / Facebook)

Kink N’ Draw
Tuesday, December 13 at Lucky, 7 pm to 10 pm. $5 suggested donation. 

If you’ve grown tired of the regular old Drink & Draw, and sketching nude models in everyday poses no longer gets your creative juices flowing, swing on down to recently-opened Avenue B dive Lucky for an unconventional take on this artistic pastime. Dominatrix and performer Lady Zombie plays hostess for the evening, which includes several “S&M-inspired tableau” poses and a wardrobe change, so you can get practice drawing, say, lace or latex in addition to the human form. Artists and aspiring artists of all skill sets and levels are welcome, as long as they bring their own sketching supplies. After the drawing has concluded, the drinking will continue as attendees and models alike are encouraged to stay and mingle.

Esther Kläs Untitled, 2013 ink on paper 19 x 24 inches (image courtesy of Coustof Waxman)

Esther Kläs Untitled, 2013 ink on paper 19 x 24 inches (image courtesy of Coustof Waxman)

GRAMMAR
Opening Friday December 16 at Coustof Waxman, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through January 22.

Chinatown art space Coustof Waxman made a splash last month with their show, Slow, dimwitted carnage, which asked artists to create unconventional sculptures that could double as containers for liquor, displayed alongside a bizarre collection of guitars emblazoned with promotional graphics and logos. For their next show, GRAMMAR, opening this Friday, it seems they’ve gone a more minimalist route. Featuring the drawings of four artists, GRAMMAR takes the unique position of framing the medium of drawing—often part of an artist’s drafting process or seen as more simple than other mediums—as “the medium closest to thought.” Thus, these four artists speak through drawing, creating “their own independent form of language” that is minimal, abstract, rough, scribbly, smudged, or anything in between.