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Moscow-born artist Andrey Kasay says his first New York show is “targeting animals, and first of all dogs.” Which might explain his animation of a crazy subway-train-esque canine chasing its own tail. Or the killer whale beached on top of a fridge. Or the cow atop a pair of bicycle wheels.
Rest assured, there’s plenty for humans to love in the batty, psychedelic world of Andrey Kasay, who goes by the name Flakonkishochki. But there’s also a fair amount of “Discomfort” — the name of the show happening tomorrow through Sunday at 272 Seigel Street in Bushwick.

Posters of the "Discomfort" exhibition (Photo courtesy of Flakonkishochki)

Posters of the “Discomfort” exhibition (Photo courtesy of Flakonkishochki)

If you’re looking for logic, you’ve come to the wrong place. Kasay’s colorful pieces infuse scenes of everyday city life with surrealism, absurdity and a lack of obvious meaning. The story behind his pseudonym gives a sense of the illustrator’s bizarre universe. “When I was a child I lived in the small town of Amursk, which is in far-east Russia and where there is absolutely nothing to do,” Kasay explained. “My friend Alex and I were always looking for some interesting and ridiculous activities, such as creating new surnames. Flakonkishochki (bottle + bowel) was one of those strange and funny surnames we created and it came up to my mind when I started to paint.”
Kasay holding one of his works (Photo courtesy of Flakonkishochki)

Kasay holding one of his works (Photo courtesy of Flakonkishochki)

Most of Flakonkischocki’s previous projects were based in his home country, where, according to his website, “the artworks were approved by the Ministry of Mental Health […] and recommended for children under school age.” The 32-year-old decided to show in Brooklyn because he “knew a girl, who knew a guy, who knew a girl, who knew guys, who have an awesome space,” he said. The exhibition of works made during a recent vacation in San Francisco explores the themes of consumption and self-destruction– “tons of things people surround themselves with, becoming their hostages.”
One of the works on display at "Discomfort" (Photo courtesy of Flakonkishochki)

One of the works on display at “Discomfort” (Photo courtesy of Flakonkishochki)

But don’t expect pretentious criticisms of rapacious capitalism or consumerism. Kasay’s most effective medium is his hardcore, straightforward humor. “I want to confuse people, make them think, make them mad,” he said. “Just as New York subway makes me mad and confused. Why is it so slow and expensive?”
Discomfort, March 3-6 (opening March 3 at 6pm) at 272 Seigel St., Bushwick.