(By Alicia DeBrincat)

(By Alicia DeBrincat)

Last week’s roundup of art openings touched on mythology and mysticism (most of those shows are still on, so go now). This week, it’s all about deconstruct, abstraction, illusion, order and chaos.

Alicia DeBrincat: Digital Interference/Analog Intervention
April 9 (opening reception 7-10pm) to April 28 at Vitrina, 90 Stanton St., Lower East Side.
Brooklyn-based artist Alicia DeBrincat is interested in the collision of photography and painting as two very different ways of presenting “visual truth”: she transfers photos, whether archival or taken by herself, onto canvas and then leaves gaps in the photographic images — oftentimes, the face is what’s left out. These gaps are then filled with brightly colored paintings. At this show, you’ll see embellished versions of celebrity mugshots from victimless crimes, e.g. Elvis’s arrest for lewd dancing or David Bowie’s arrest for marijuana possession, along with archival photos of powerful cultural figures from the past including Queen Victoria, Buffalo Bill, and Wyatt Earp.

How ’bout Now?
Apr 10 (opening reception 6-9pm) to April 24, Brooklyn Fire Proof /Temporary Storage Gallery, 119 Ingraham St., Bushwick
The artists in this show rely on “the fragmentation of imagery” or the “dissolve of the literal to achieve abstraction,” per curator Curator Dan Kopp, who thinks we’re too casual about photos these days. “We dissect them casually too — for Instagram we filter them/etc. The idea of creating art out of a moment we’ve found in this dissection excites me — especially abstraction art that has physicality,” Kopp told us in an email. “This casual deconstruction gets flipped on its head when it gets used to make art that requires a lot of craft.” That art will consist of paintings, sculpture, sculpture as painting, and painting as sculpture.

Vanishing Act
April 11 (opening reception 7-10pm) to April 26, Heliopolis, 154 Huron St., Greenpoint
These works by members of Nashville’s curatorial collective Coop are inspired by a magician’s vanishing act. Video, collage, painting, and sculpture will explore how the vanishing act, whether it’s a playful trick or an outright disappearance, “involves the production of illusion through trickery and deceit, and leaves us with sudden loss and ensuing wonder,” per the press release.

Art Work by Doug Cloninger

Art Work by Doug Cloninger

Doug Cloninger: Mother Nature On The Run
April 9 (opening reception 7-9pm) to May 2 at Castor Gallery, 254 Broome St., Lower East Side
The canvases of Louisiana-based artist Doug Cloninger echo his native landscape’s colors and tones: the abundance of pinks, greens, and tans are meant to evoke “an overarching feeling of serenity and peacefulness and a space of contemplation,” per the release. While avoiding form altogether, Cloninger’s “atmospheric” paintings, with their layers of color, reflect nature’s ability to shift between order and chaos. The paintings seem orderly when looked at from afar, but closer inspection reveals the underlying tumult.

Heaven Carrier
Through May 3 at Richard Taittinger Gallery, 154 Ludlow St., Lower East Side
In this group show by Russian artist collective Recycle Group, old-time religious icons and reigning figures come face-to-face with contemporary technology: “heaven” is the utopia promised by all fates and “carrier” is the corporation providing data services. Is there still a difference between the two, since both seem to be omni-present and omni-potent? That’s the question the works presented are trying to answer. Come up with your personal interpretation of this conflict (?) or evolution (??) or dystopic universe (???) by ogling works like “Tower,” a futuristic revision of ancient obelisks, or “Dome,” which recalls the trompe l’oeil oculus of the Camera degli Sposi of Mantua’s Ducal Palace. Portrait busts scattered around the space retain their classical and Renaissance-like beauty and proportion, even if they’re made from rubber polyurethane.

Kirstin Jones: Anemographs
April 10 to May 10 at Art 101, 101 Grand St., Williamsburg
Artist Kristin Jones is best known for her installations involving open spaces and threads, and for “Tevereterno,” a project aimed at “reviving” Rome’s Tiber river. Anemographs is a more intimate show consisting of a series of drawings created “in collaboration with the wind,” and with elements of moving water and shifting air currents.