If you missed last night’s sold-out closing performance of Smile Swamp Princess, don’t worry: there’s plenty more great theater to be seen in the months ahead. Here’s what we’re especially excited to watch and (in one case) star in!

All The Faces of the Moon

The Public Theater, 425 Lafayette St., East Village; Sept. 5 to Oct. 3
While all artistic institutions talk about making a commitment to the people they work with, the Public Theater is not afraid to back up an artist who’s having a tough time. Last year, after an ugly incident on This American Life soured Mike Daisey’s reputation, the Public was proud to welcome him back, for a series of new monthly one man shows in Joe’s Pub. This year, they’re going further — asking the infinitely prolific storyteller to perform original work 29 nights in a row. For the brave theatergoers who make it to every performance, they have a singular prize: a kiss from the ever-cuddly artistic director, Oskar Eustis. The Public Theater, 425 Lafayette Street

Isles of Ice and Ash

Isles of Ice and Ash

The Dance & The Dawn
The Brick Theater, 579 Metropolitan Ave., Williamsburg, Sept. 7 and 14
Maintaining its reputation as the most serious theater space in Williamsburg, The Brick offers two nights of “interactive literature,” in which 13 audience members take on the roles of the Ladies of Ash and Lords of Ice — a group of gothic nobles chasing true love at a midnight ball. Prospective audience members are required to fill out a “casting questionnaire,” to determine which part they’re best suited for, but one need not be an acting major to apply. For the waltz-inept, a dancing tutorial will be offered before each of the two performances.

Something Something Über Alles

Robert Honeywell in Something Something Über Alles.

Robert Honeywell in Something Something Über Alles.

UNDER St. Marks, 94 St. Marks Pl., East Village; Sept. 19 to Oct. 5
Iranian playwright Assurbanipal Babilla fled Tehran after the fundamentalist revolution of 1979, and made New York his home until his death in 2011. A favorite of the East Village avant garde, Babilla’s work was joyously weird, and this revival of the one-man show Something Something Über Alles keeps that mad spirit alive. The story of a man whose uncanny resemblance to Adolf Hitler makes him the idol of a neo-Nazi cult, it’s basically Life Of Brian meets The Boys From Brazil. If that’s not worth a trip to Fourth Street, then what is?

RoosevElvis
The Bushwick Starr, 207 Starr St., Bushwick; Oct. 9 to Nov. 2
Collaborative theater group The TEAM, whose recent Mission Drift squeezed the whole history of the American frontier into two apocalypse-tinged hours, comes to Bushwick with a tale as old as time. On a roadtrip to Graceland, a cripplingly shy meat worker is haunted by the spirits of the twin specters of American masculinity: Elvis Presley and Teddy Roosevelt. Performed by Kristen Sieh and Libby King, it should be wild, weird, funny and (like most TEAM joints) packed full of quality music.

The Last Two People on Earth: An Apocalyptic Vaudeville
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Classic Stage Company, 136 E. 13th St., East Village; begins Dec. 14
Although their upcoming Romeo & Juliet, featuring William Hurt and Daphne Rubin-Vega, seems poised to continue CSC’s tradition of mounting excellent, lively productions of Shakespeare, the more exciting show seems to be December’s The Last Two People On Earth: An Apocalyptic Vaudeville. The titular survivors are Mandy Patinkin and Taylor Mac, the preposterously talented, rail-thin singer who stole the show as Puck in CSC’s 2012 A Midsummer Night’s Dream. For those who only know Patinkin as Homeland‘s ultra-pragmatic Saul Berenson, this will be a welcome chance to get to know his singing, dancing, pratfalling side.