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About Those Geodesic Domes That Have Popped Up in Soho

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

Our love of geodesic domes is such that we’re willing to travel uptown for them, so imagine our excitement when we noticed a trio of them being erected at the corner of Varick and Canal, near the Holland Tunnel. OMG, could these be the orgy domes of the future? A new pied–à–terre for Jack White’s brother? The latest iteration of PS1’s art dome? A long-overdue Buckminster Fuller museum?

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This Week’s Art: A Fish Market Repurposed and Many Types of ‘Graphic Art’

Mike Taylor (image via Idio Gallery)

Mike Taylor (image via Idio Gallery)

Mike Taylor: Condensed Flesh
Opening Thursday October 13 at Idio Gallery, 6 pm to 11 pm. On view through October 30.

East Williamsburg space Idio Gallery put out a call for crowdsourced financial support several months ago, which very well could have signaled that it was beginning to scale down. However, with a show at Bushwick Open Studios and another show opening shortly after, they don’t appear to be going anywhere. This one is a solo show, presenting works on paper and paintings by renowned graphic artist Mike Taylor, created between 2012 and now. Finished works won’t be the only thing on display in this show, as Idio’s downstairs basement space will be transformed into a showcase of the artist in-process, with drawings not yet done, prints, and “printmaking debris” on view as well. Taylor’s work is bold and bright, often utilizing neon colors and mixing abstract patterns with notes of realism and the human form filtered through the style of the illustrator and comic artist.

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Chinese Food Stories, Dirty Drawings, and More Art This Week

(flyer via Mia Schachter / Facebook)

(flyer via Mia Schachter / Facebook)

Co//Modified: A Showcase of Design Artists
Opening Monday October 3 at The Living Gallery, 7 pm to 10 pm. One night only. 

In this one-night-only show curated by Mia Schachter, eight artists who “straddle the line of intention between utilitarian design and art” will make their way to Bushwick’s The Living Gallery to show their work. Many of these artists make work that they predominantly try to sell as useful objects, like hyperstylized papier-mâché percussion instruments, ceramic mugs or pots, and embroidery. This show seeks to lay their salesperson spirit to rest momentarily so they can merely show off their creations as art. But if you’d like to go home with a piece or two, you’ll be able to do so as well.

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Many Marys, and a Broome Street Salon and More Performance Picks

(image via Future Forms / Facebook)

(image via Future Forms / Facebook)

WEDNESDAY

Future Forms
Wednesday, September 28 at Throne Watches, 8 pm: FREE. 

The future may not be looking very great for the country/society as a whole, but it’s looking okay for the four hosts of this recurring comedy show: Mary Houlihan recently went viral for her hilarious and biting interview with Martin Shkreli, “space prince” Julio Torres was recently hired as an SNL writer, Sam Taggart was named one of Brooklyn’s funniest people, and Joe Rumrill‘s face is currently comedian Tig Notaro‘s Twitter avatar. While they’re all certainly busy with all this and more, they still find time to gather in this Williamsburg watch store and host a comedy show.

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Gabriel Byrne, Electeds Try to Save Elizabeth St. Garden From New Threat

(photo: Cassidy Dawn Graves)

(photo: Cassidy Dawn Graves)

Walking down Soho’s Elizabeth Street can feel like a neverending vortex of high-class retail, where the designer clothing racks outnumber the people. That is, until you arrive at the lush, green Elizabeth Street Garden, between Prince and Spring Streets. The green “oasis” (as many have dubbed it) and community hub is once again being actively considered for a site for affordable senior housing, a decision that has long been opposed by Community Board 2 but supported by the area’s City Council member Margaret Chin.

The 20,000-square-foot garden is city-owned, but privately leased by gallerist Allan Reiver, who initially planned to use it to store his sculptures but opened it up as a unique respite from the city’s concrete surroundings, full of colorful flowers, green grass, seating areas, and many eye-catching sculptures. Volunteer-run, the garden has been used for community events, education, performances, film screenings, and an annual Harvest Festival. Some of these events draw hundreds of people, located in a neighborhood the NYC Parks Department has previously identified as “underserved by open space.”

Last week, news surfaced that the NYC Housing and Preservation Development (HPD) had officially issued a Request for Proposals to develop the land the garden stands on. Wednesday afternoon, dozens gathered in the garden for a press conference, bearing signs and passionately asserting their garden’s right to remain where it is.

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Performance Picks: Womanhood, Rihanna, Cake, and Fashion

WEDNESDAY

(image via Housing Works)

(image via Housing Works / Facebook)

Womanhood Live!
At Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, 7 pm: FREE. 

If you’re not the type to sit around watching short-form video clips all day, this is the show for you. Impressively funny ladies Jo Firestone and Aparna Nancherla are bringing their Refinery29 web series, “Womanhood,” to a real, live venue. No more straining your eyes staring at bright screens to get your laugh on– these are 100% in-person joke-tellers, which is probably a lot more fun than 100% in-person bank tellers. Firestone and Nancherla have graciously assembled a group of nice folk to help them teach you all about the complex terrain of women’s bodies and lives, including Dylan Marron, Naomi Ekperegin, Marlena Rodriguez, and Diana Kolsky (who will truly contain multitudes as “The Haters.”) You might wanna take your headphones off for this one.

THURSDAY

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All the Art Shows You Best Not Miss

(Image via Booklyn)

(Image via Booklyn)

Up Against The Wall
Opening Tuesday August 30, 7 pm to 10 pm at Booklyn. On view through September 27. 

Greenpoint “artist and bookmakers organization” Booklyn, which has impressively been hanging around since 1999, presents this exhibition of prints by two projects: Imagining Apartheid, a Montreal-based initiative bringing awareness to Palestinian liberation and the BDS movement with a focus on Israeli Apartheid, and Celebrate People’s History: Iraq Veterans Against the War, a portfolio project which aims to highlight veteran and active duty members who were against the war and have spoken out over the last ten years. Placed side-by-side, these prints and posters highlight years of a common struggle and fight for demilitarization and justice regardless of country or nationality.

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Art Hearts: Daughters of Mercury + Pieces of Women + Liar, Liar Art’s on Fire

(Image via Sharon Spell)

(Image via Sharon Spell)

Close Hamm
Opening Monday August 15,  7 pm to 9 pm at ROOQ Fine Arts and Framing. On view through January 17.

Artist Sharon Spell seems to have each one of her hands equally in art and comedy: she’s worked with UCB since 2007, performs at The Moth, and has illustrated comic strips for the freaky people at The Onion, just to name a few bits from her resume. These two worlds unite in her “Close Hamm” diptychs– paintings depicting two distinct people joined together to create one image, much like the fine art of balance an improv-comedy duo’s always aiming for.

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Performance Picks: Harsh Noise Videos IRL, LOL Sadism, and Theatre Ina Garden

THURSDAY

(via Housing Works)

(via Housing Works)

Loose: A Comedy Show
August 11, 7 pm at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe: $10. 

The always-effervescent Jo Firestone hosts this monthly evening of chuckles at the equally warmhearted Housing Works. But Firestone’s no ordinary comedy show host, no siree– she’s the brains behind ventures like Punderdome 3000, that oh-so-thrilling pun contest that’s either your worst nightmare or best dream come true.

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Here’s Where To Hate-Watch the RNC Tonight

(WNYC Studios)

(WNYC Studios)

Some people are on the FBI Watchlist. Well, this is the RNC Watchlist, where you can settle down at a bar, event space, or Republican haunt (if you’re nasty) and bear witness to the great and terrible orange man, as he drips words and possibly froth from his mouth, instilling fear into impressionable folk about how no one can save our country but him. Though the news has painted a fairly grim picture of the US recently, I’m pretty sure Donald and I have different definitions of what “saving” something means.

If the reality of this week’s Republican National Convention is too wretched to behold as truth, you can pretend you’re watching a movie. But let’s hope it’s a movie that compels you to educate yourself and vote in all of your state and local elections, in addition to the big one in November. You can be the change you want to see in the world… If your vote manages to be counted, that is. Yikes.

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Sonos Got Thurston Moore, Kyp Malone and Others to Turn Its New Flagship Into a Shrine of Sound

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I met a man today whose religion was speakers. Whitney Walker, the general manager of retail for the soon-to-be-unveiled Sonos store in Soho, talked to me for an hour about sound diffusion and stereo design and, while I’m not sure, there’s a chance our discussion may have ended with me agreeing to check out their literature. Who knows? 

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Photos From Puck Fair’s Last Hurrah: ‘This Is Not Goodbye!’

Patrons, bartender, bouncer and kitchen staff downstairs at Puck Fair during its final weekend, 3/27 at 3am.

Patrons, bartender, bouncer and kitchen staff downstairs at Puck Fair during its final weekend, 3/27 at 3am.

The floor of Puck Fair was pounding on Friday as patrons wished the Soho pub a rising road. Perched atop the bar with a guitar, Pierce Turner led his string quartet through a full set and then an hour-long encore. As he walked along the length of the bar (half a city block), a sing-along boomed up to the high ceiling. Violins and cello responded from the balcony, creating an exchange that shook the house like, well, a wrecking crew.

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