romance

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An Iron Maiden Among Cowboys From Hell: I Survived Speed Metal Dating

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

Now I have you with me, under my power. Our love grows stronger now with every hour. Look into my eyes, you’ll see who I am. My name is Lucifer, please take my hand. – Black Sabbath

Yesterday eve, a hoard of leather-jacket-clad girls with flowing manes and practiced scowl-pouts made their way to their assigned seats at Saint Vitus. The mood was heavy, everyone seemed to know that they faced the potential for both complete humiliation and romantic glory at the very first Speed Metal Dating. I was among the 74 people who showed up, a sacrificial lamb for stunt journalism.

What happened? Lemmy tell you…

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9 Ways to Do Valentine’s Day That Are More Oddball Than Cheeseball

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

As inevitable as your student loan bills, Valentine’s Day is once again around the corner. If you’re inclined to celebrate it ironically rather than romantically, fret not: this is, after all, a city of misanthropes. At these Valentine’s weekend events, there’ll be nary a chocolate heart in sight.

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Plan Your Romance Revolt at This Holiday Lingerie Pop-Up on Ludlow Street

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(Photo by Kavitha Surana)

Whitney Brown predicts 2016 might be the year New Yorkers finally turn off Tinder. (We imagine every bartender in town is rooting for this miracle as well.) But she’s adamant that our Seamless hook-up mentality has just about run its course, and we’re bound to return to an era where big, romantic gestures are in style once again. “Romance in the 21st century is in sort of a struggle stage,” Brown said. It was hard to imagine this willowy model-entrepreneur could be having any issues. Well actually, Brown is in the business of love, or romance at least, so it’s in her best interest to see a return to romance.

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Aziz Ansari to Everyone at His Book Signing: ‘Please Don’t Murder Me’

DSC_5420“Yeah, I just got back from a year working as a bartender in Malawi,” said the windswept blonde to the doe-eyed brunette seated beside him, and behind me, as we awaited the delayed arrival of Aziz Ansari. The banner at the entrance to the Union Square Barnes & Noble read “Aziz Ansari: Modern Romance – Book Signing, 12pm.” My watch showed 12:34, as I continued to unwittingly learn more about the “dark continent,” courtesy of this rather endless, self-involved pick-up attempt. “Mr Ansari is currently stuck in traffic and sends his apologies,” explained a store clerk. Apology not accepted, Aziz.

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Get Me a Guy at Under St Marks

New Yorkers are not only constantly dramatizing their own already rather dramatic love lives, but also adore consuming dramatizations of other such love lives: see Sex and the CityGirlsHitchGossip Girl,Forty Days of Dating, and so on and so forth. Now, Horse Trade Theater Group brings you the rare opportunity to see some disastrous romantic escapades (not your own!) LIVE, at their production of Get Me a Guy. The 80-minute comedy, written by Israela Margalit and directed by John Clancy, is a spirited romp through a series of dating vignettes. Having begun life as a one-act, the play won Margalit plaudits at the New York International Midtown Theater Festival and the New York Short Play Festival, and was subsequently fleshed out into a full-length, eclectic meditation on life and love.

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Reading: Love Comes Later With Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar

Love Comes Later is one of the first English language novels to be set in Qatar, and has become one of a long list of books to be banned in that country. Doha-based author Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar researched and wrote the novel in Qatar, but will not get to see it reach shelves there despite the fact that the book is hardly overtly political or controversial. Rather, the plot centers on an arranged engagement between two reluctant cousins, and the love triangle that develops when one of the betrothed falls for someone else. The novel interrogates the connections between South Asian and Arab cultures and the oppressive potential of cultural expectations. “Rajakumar pulls back the veil on life in Qatar to reveal a glimpse of Muslim life rarely seen by Westerners,” as per Kirkus Reviews. Join Rajakumar for a reading from the novel.