gallery openings

No Comments

Gallery Sleepover, Magical Laughter Workshop, and Other Art Occasions

Untitled, 1971 Ink on paper 27.6 x 35.2 cm / 10 7/8 x 13 7/8 in © The Estate of Philip Guston Courtesy Hauser & Wirth

Untitled, 1971
Ink on paper
27.6 x 35.2 cm / 10 7/8 x 13 7/8 in
© The Estate of Philip Guston
Courtesy Hauser & Wirth

Laughter in the Dark, Drawings from 1971 & 1975
Opening Tuesday, November 1 at Hauser & Wirth 22nd Street, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through January 14. 

While our heads are all aflurry with the politics of today, it could be good to take a break, clear your head before you place pen to paper and fill out that absentee ballot, trying not to smudge the ink with your tears of frustration and hopelessness. Though this election season seems truly eternal, there were other presidents, and there was art made about them, too. Hauser & Wirth’s 22nd Street location will be showing a tremendous collection of Philip Guston’s satirical caricature drawings of Richard Nixon, from his well-known “Poor Richard” series to collections of sketches rarely seen by the public, if at all.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Art This Week: Selfie Voyeuring, Searching For Terry, Reduced ‘Crapitalism’

Andrew Gori & Ambre Kelly, Couple – Teotihuacan, Mexico, 2014 © Andrew Gori & Ambre Kelly (image via NY Artists Equity Association)

Andrew Gori & Ambre Kelly, Couple – Teotihuacan, Mexico, 2014 © Andrew Gori & Ambre Kelly (image via NY Artists Equity Association)

Andrew Gori and Ambre Kelly, Sightseers
Opening Tuesday, October 18 at Equity Gallery, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through October 29.

Arielle de Saint Phalle curates a show of work by Andrew Gori and Ambre Kelly, founders of the SPRING/BREAK Art Show among other projects, curatorial and otherwise. For the first time, the two artists will be showing a series of collaborative photographs they’ve taken over the course of five years. The photos are described as a chronicle of “the self-portraiture practice of travelers and tourists,” which is essentially a fancy way to say you’re taking pix of people taking selfies in various locations. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. As selfies have become more and more ubiquitous throughout the world, a documentation of how people take them, especially in international travel hubs and beyond, sounds certainly intriguing. Sure, it’s definitely a little weird and voyeuristic to be showing them in a fine art space, but I suppose it’s just a more permanent form of people-watching. In stark constrast to the high-tech smartphone, which is prime vehicle for selfies, all of the photos on display were taken with 20th Century prosumer film cameras. So no, that’s not just a vintage Instagram filter.

Keep Reading »

1 Comment

All Right! Bob’s Burgers Tribute Art Show Is an Animated Hit

Rezatron, "The Real Belcher Family." (image courtesy of Spoke Art)

Rezatron, “The Real Belcher Family.” (image courtesy of Spoke Art)

Last week, hundreds swarmed a Lower East Side gallery. They diligently lined up to see Bob, Linda, Louise, Tina, Gene, and others from beloved animated series Bob’s Burgers, immortalized within 75 works of art. Inside, the air was warm with bodies and beef (sliders were served all evening courtesy of Bareburger) and a certain delight pervaded the space. The gallery’s back wall was transformed into a life-size version of Bob Belcher’s animated restaurant counter, complete with actual ketchup and mustard bottles.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Fruit-Powered Chandeliers, Brooklyn Drag Art, and Other Art Happenings

"SELF REFLECTION" The Untitled Space Gallery, New York

(image courtesy of Milk & Night Curatorial)

Self-Reflection
Opening Tuesday September 27 at The Untitled Space, 6 pm to 9 pm. On view through October 8. 

No less than 21 female artists will descend upon Tribeca art gallery The Untitled Space this Tuesday for the show “Self-Reflection.” Their art spans multiple genres, but all pieces will focus on some form of self-portrait, using the artists’s own bodies as a tool for creation. These self-portraits aren’t the typical depiction of oneself; some are even constructed through wool tapestry weaving. Rather than being potrayed by others, where objectification and the pesky male gaze can run rampant, these women will take their bodies into their own hands (in some cases, literally) to construct a self that feels authentic to them, however that might manifest. Some photograph themselves, some use images of their own nude form for painting references– either way, it’s all them.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Vist Trump’s Tombstone and Some Other Art Shows This Week

(flyer via Manhattan BP Gale Brewer)

(flyer via Manhattan BP Gale Brewer)

Arlene Schulman: The First 100 Years
Reception Tuesday September 20 at The David N. Dinkins Municipal Building, 5 pm to 7 pm. On view through September 29. 

Bronx-born Arlene Schulman has had a robust career as a photographer, with an array of published books, including the award-winning The Prizefighters: An Intimate Look at Champions and Contenders. Her photos reflect a lifetime living in the city, and I mean lifetime: she started taking photos when she was a mere eight years old. They focus on the everyday and the working class, portraying subjects like police officers and boxers in large-format prints. And photography isn’t all she does– she also writes, edits, and teaches. This exhibit, presented by Manhattan BP Gale A. Brewer, seeks to showcase her large body of work and the unique way she sees the city. But careful, don’t go offering her the chance to shoot artful pictures of any lima beans or olives—she writes on her website that she hates those.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Art Openings: Genderless Fashion, Return of the East Village Eye, and More

Raque Ford, Yours Truly, Georgia Brown, 2016, Laser cut plexiglass. (image via ISCP)

Raque Ford, Yours Truly, Georgia Brown, 2016, Laser cut plexiglass. (image via ISCP)

Yours Truly, Georgia Brown
Opening Tuesday September 13 at International Studio and Curatorial Program, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through October 11.

In this show, artist Raque Ford takes on the character of Georgia Brown, a “temptress” figure from the 1940s film and Broadway musical Cabin in the Sky. The show made history as the first production to feature an entirely African-American cast, but the creators were (shocking!) all white. Using a variety of techniques, including plexiglass sculpture and a zine of handwritten letters that attendees can take home with them, Ford will reexamine and rewrite the narrative of Georgia Brown through a rigorous and contemporary lens.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Pass a Tortilla Factory and Enter a Phantasmagoria of Art

Kimia Ferdowsi Kline, "Breathless" (image courtesy of IDIO Gallery)

Kimia Ferdowsi Kline, “Breathless” (image courtesy of IDIO Gallery)

Rice paper aerobics exercises, blotchy watercolor eeriness, and vast colorful landscapes all intermingle in a dance of shapes and shades in Phantasmagoria, an exhibit of works on paper that opened this past Friday at Bushwick’s IDIO Gallery, curated by Gillian Zinser and IDIO’s director Montana Simone.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

‘Made in Bushwick’: Gentrification Hits Home For a Born-and-Bred Photographer

(Photo by Danielle De Jesus)

(Photo by Danielle De Jesus)

Danielle De Jesus is surprisingly level-headed when talking about how gentrification has affected her family and her community. The 27-year-old artist was born and raised in Bushwick and has seen the neighborhood change dramatically over the past several years. Her photographs, part of a one-day-only exhibition, “Made in Bushwick,” happening at the Living Gallery this Thursday evening, capture a neighborhood most newcomers might never have seen and the stark contrast between old and new.

Keep Reading »