(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

Do you remember the Museum of Ice Cream? That not-really-a-museum pop-up thing that drew massive lines of selfie-seekers to the Meatpacking a few years back? Made a ton of money here, and is now touring the country?

Well Egg House, which just opened on the LES, is exactly like that, but instead of ice cream, it’s all about eggs. More specifically: it’s all about a series of Instagram-friendly installations that visually involve (or evoke) eggs. Sit in The Kitchen’s enormous “cardboard” half-dozen container and pose with some literally jumbo-sized ovoids. Be the baby-chick emoji and emerge all chirpy from an egg-shell spinning chair. Go down to The Garden in the basement and swing in an cracked egg shell surrounded by yolk-yellow balloons and, for some reason, neon cacti.

The biggest draw at Egg House will surely be The Pool, which is really just an expansive yellow and white ball pit that also happens to be kind of irresistible. In fact, as pointless as it all is, the whole bi-level storefront space is well-conceived, genuinely fun, and niftily designed by a team of SVA, NYU, Pratt, and Parsons alumni. You can buy photogenic snacks too, like ice cream with egg waffle bits from Eggloo, or (presumably) a breakfast sandwich from Egg Shop.

The Egg House is located at 195 Chrystie Street between Stanton and Rivington and is open daily through May 20. Timed tickets cost $18 for adults (there are 21 half-hour entry slots available each day, though you can stay for as long as like), and must be purchased in advance.