The crowd

The crowd

Blackout

Blackout

Jerkface with stilted fan

Jerkface with stilted fan

Stilts

Stilts

Lexi Bella

Lexi Bella

Go! Push Pops

Go! Push Pops

Fan selfie with Iron Force

Fan selfie with Iron Force

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photo: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

Meres One

Meres One

Eric Lee Bowman, who makes his own film

Eric Lee Bowman, who makes his own film

See One

See One

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

Case

Case

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

Vers

Vers

Fumero

Fumero

bcbp70

bcbp70

Blackout

Blackout

City Kitty

City Kitty

Optimo

Optimo

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

(Photos: Scott Lynch)

Block partier

Block partier

The third annual Bushwick Collective Block Party went down yesterday on Troutman Street and, like most everything else in the city these days, it was bigger than ever before. More artists live painting more murals. More food trucks and various vendors. More bands, more beer, and just more actual street, as the whole block between Wyckoff and St. Nicholas and was shut down for the day.

But because there are also so many new food and booze spots in “Jefftown” right now (Montana’s Trail House and The Diggs, to name the newest ones), the block never really felt all that packed, as the neighborhood is able to absorb throngs of party people.

Organized and curated by Bushwick Collective’s Joseph Ficalora, the live painting part of the day’s festivities featured an impressive roster of street artists, including Jerkface, Fumero, Lexi Bella, See One, Rubin315, Vexta, Case, Pixel Pancho, and tons more, all of whom did double duty posing for fan photos and tagging up black books. Of course, all of the new murals will be up for awhile, so even if you missed the party you can still go see the art.

The weather was perfect, the music loud and metal (Iron Force killed), and the Del’s Frozen Lemonade kept the crowd cool. There was also a lot of overlap with the sprawling and increasingly popular Bushwick Open Studios, which drew large numbers of folks to area workspaces, studios and street corners all weekend as well.