American Contemporary

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That Feeling When You Leave Your 200-Acre Tree Farm For a Tiny Greenpoint Art Studio

Shara Hughes in front of "Tree Farm", Photo courtesy of Giulia Alexandra

Shara Hughes in front of “Tree Farm”, Photo courtesy of Giulia Alexandra

When Shara Hughes was born, her father bought her and her three brothers 200 acres of land each in rural Georgia. It was the early ’80s and land was going for 10 cents an acre. Her father saw his opportunity and planted a tree farm. Shara spent a lot of her childhood on that property, learning about land and taking care of the trees. She still goes there to enjoy the space and the nature and when she moved to New York from Atlanta in August last year, land – because there’s so little of it in the city – was the first thing she thought about.

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Alex Da Corte Sees the World Through a Piss-Filled Malt Liquor Bottle

Alex Da Corte, "April Fools," 2014: Rubber, anodized metal frames, VCT tile, wood, foam, garland, ceramic Hershey Kiss, latex witch nose, artificial mushroom, Coca-Cola can, Plexiglas 60.5 x 49 x 64 inches.

Alex Da Corte, “April Fools,” 2014: Rubber, anodized metal frames, VCT tile, wood, foam, garland, ceramic Hershey Kiss, latex witch nose, artificial mushroom, Coca-Cola can, Plexiglas 60.5 x 49 x 64 inches.

“Does the food we eat or the way we clean our toilet reflect if we’re obsessive compulsive or if we’re Virgos?” asked Alex Da Corte yesterday evening outside of American Contemporary gallery in the East Village. These are some of the questions Da Corte and five other artists address in “The Cardboard Lover,” which opened at said gallery yesterday evening. In a broader sense, the show explores the concept of “zaniness” as it applies to modern methods of production and consumerism. “It’s considering ways in which we organize domestic space and how it reflects if we’re cute or funny or serious,” Da Corte said.
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