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Virtual Performance Picks: Wordy Wonderlands and One Final Drag

WEDNESDAY

(image via @oopstagramt / Instagram)

Oops!
Wednesday, April 1 on @harajukubk Instagram Live, 10 pm: FREE (suggested donation)

Typically happening at queer bar The Rosemont, drag show Oops is one of the events that immediately flocked to a virtual setting. Hosts West Dakota and Harajuku have been drawing digital crowds in the hundreds to witness their antics, which have ranged from more traditional lip-syncs to leaning into the virtual format by playing with the split screen video feeds that come with an Instagram Live. In lieu of the dollars tossed at IRL drag shows, the queens accept Venmo tips, of course. After a couple weekly shows, this will be the final Instagram Live version of the show, according to their social media. Is it a savvy April Fool’s joke or is the novelty of virtual shows already starting to fade? Presumably, the only way to find out is by tuning in.

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New Yorkers Are Using 311 to Report Social Distancing Violations, and Police Are Responding

Social distancing in Madison Square. (Photo: Janine and Jim Eden via Wiki Commons)

As the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases rises to more than 47,439 in New York City, people are taking social distancing more seriously. City data shows that in the past three days in Manhattan, a total of 289 complaints regarding social distancing violations were made via 311, with police responding to all of the calls and taking action in one third of the cases. More →

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Grassroots ‘Coffee to the Frontlines’ Effort Keeps Hospital Workers Caffeinated

(Photos courtesy of Leigh Adel-Arnold, pictured in front.)

Last week, Starbucks began offering free coffee to frontline workers, which was an amazing idea — an amazing idea that Leigh Adel-Arnold had already put into action. “It’s fantastic that they’re doing that,” says Leigh, who definitely isn’t competing against Starbucks. “Especially because now there are coffee places on every corner that are closed.” More →

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NYU Students Have Left the Building (And Aren’t Happy About It)

(Photo: Tdorante10/Wiki Commons)

Paola Nagovitch, a journalism student at New York University, received an email on March 9 from the school’s administration about coronavirus-related measures NYU planned to take. The email asked students to take their laptops, books and notebooks with them during spring break. She left New York to her hometown in Puerto Rico that same week thinking she would be able to return at some point to her student residence. However, on March 16 she received another email from the school asking students to be out of their residences “by no later than March 22, and preferably within 48 hours.” That same week Puerto Rico’s governor announced a nationwide lockdown and curfew, discarding any possibility Nagovitch had of returning to New York. More →

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Hasidic Williamsburg Has Been Making Grim Headlines; Netflix’s ‘Unorthodox’ Aims to Trade Sensationalism For Authenticity

(Stills from “Unorthodox” courtesy of Netflix)

“You can really get into the weeds,” said Alexa Karolinski, the co-creator and co-writer of Netflix’s new mini-series Unorthodox. “Like, should she wear something on her head during her wedding? Should he be wearing white socks? Should the shirt be fully buttoned?” Being hyper-specific in dress and in ritual was vital for capturing a tradition-rich community on the margins, and Unorthodox has positioned itself as one of the most ambitiously detailed renderings of the Williamsburg Satmar Hasidic community ever on screen.  More →

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With NYC Now an Epicenter, Students Go to Great Lengths to Get Home to China

Returnees to Beijing waiting to be registered and sent to quarantine hotels. (Photos: Alice Qin)

As soon as New York confirmed its first case of coronavirus infection, Alice Qin, a sophomore at Barnard College, started considering flying back to China. When Columbia and Barnard moved all of its classes online, Qin booked a direct flight scheduled to depart on March 24. More →