Social Justice

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Stronger Vision Zero Plan Demanded in Wake of Increasing Traffic Deaths

(Photos: Cecilia Nowell)

A bike messenger delivered two bags of fresh-cut flowers to City Hall just in time for Transportation Alternatives and Families for Safe Streets to take to the steps. At noon, members of the two organizations, joined by sympathetic city council members, laid pink roses and yellow carnations at the steps of City Hall– alongside photographs of loved ones who had died in traffic accidents. The organizations had joined forces to declare a state of emergency on Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Vision Zero Plan. More →

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50 Years After Stonewall, Art Show Honors Diversity of the Queer Rights Movement

(Photos: Cecilia Nowell)

Documentary footage from the 20th-anniversary commemoration of the Stonewall Uprisings plays at the entrance to the Grey Art Gallery. On screen, activists laud the riots sparked by Marsha P. Johnson from the stage, while protestors boo loudly from the sidelines. Under a large sign welcoming visitors to “Art after Stonewall, 1969-1989,” the video, produced by ACT UP’s guerilla video collective DIVA TV, sets the tone for an exhibit that explores how much has, and has not, changed for the queer community 50 years after the Stonewall Riots.

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Bedtime Stories Get Woke at This Library and Exhibit of Radical Kids Books

Children’s books have a way of teaching lessons without coming across as preachy or insistent. They teach you to eat your vegetables and take care of others with playful language and bright illustrations. And, for some reason, they tend to stick with us. Those first stories stay in the back of our heads well into adulthood, reminding us to be kind to animals, try new things, and maybe give lima beans a chance.

If you’re hoping to teach your children even more radical lessons than those (or just looking for some great children’s books for yourself), you might want to head over to Sunset Park’s art and bookmaking collective Booklyn for its latest exhibition: “Lil’ Radicals: Multicultural and Social Justice Publications for Kids in the 21st Century.”

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New Yorkers Mark Triangle Shirtwaist Anniversary and Push For Permanent Memorial

(Photos: Cecilia Nowell)

Eight chalk silhouettes cover the sidewalk at the corner of Greene Street and Washington Place. Earlier today, union members, activists, city officials and others gathered outside the landmarked site of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory to honor the 108th anniversary of the historic blaze that revealed abhorrent working conditions but ultimately strengthened the labor movement.

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L Stations Get Elevators, But Critics Say MTA Still Too Slow On Accessibility

(Photos: Clarrie Feinstein)

Susan Scheer lives in the East Village and her daughter lives just across the river. But jumping on the L train to visit her isn’t an option. Scheer uses a wheelchair, and there’s no elevator at the First Avenue stop. “What would be a five-minute commute for most people, isn’t even possible for me,” says Scheer. Oftentimes, her daughter must make the commute to see her.

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‘The Haunted Files’ Plunges You into the Dark, Enduring History of Racial Eugenics

Eugenics is often associated with Nazi Germany, but the pseudo-scientific movement is a dark and often-overlooked part of our national past. “The Nazis came to America to learn,” notes Judy Tate of the American Slavery Project. And the epicenter of American eugenics research was very closeby.

The Haunted Files, coming Wednesday to the Sheen Center, is a one-night immersive experience that draws on real files from the Eugenics Records Office, on Long Island’s North Shore. It will ask theatergoers to look deeply at some very difficult history in our backyard. Work conducted at the ERO helped to codify and provide “scientific” underpinning to many still-prevalent concepts: racial hierarchies, IQ testing, strict border divisions, and even the idea of “illegal” personhood.

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