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McSorley’s’ First Female Bartender Keeps Its Spirit Alive

Teresa Maher de la Haba.


McSorley’s Ale House hasn’t changed much in the last century: its floors are still lined with sawdust bought from the same Long Island-based family for the past 80 years, black-and-white photos line its walls containing centuries of history, and a centrally located iron fireplace still burns wood to keep it warm during the winter. But in 1994, Teresa Maher de la Haba became the first McSorley’s bartender with a soprano voice.  More →

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Fight Intensifies Over Exam That’s Said to Keep Black Students Out of NYC’s Elite High Schools

Members of PLACE staged a rally at City Hall in October to advocate for the SHSAT. (Photo: Jasmine Photo)

One month after Sierra Fraser participated in a demonstration against New York City’s high school admissions testing, she’s visibly distressed about the experience.

“It was rough,” the 18-year-old college freshman tells me over Zoom, her hair sitting atop her head in a tight bun and her voice quickly turning from quiet and composed to loud and frustrated. Sierra adjusts her glasses and looks up at the ceiling: “We were chanting ‘Black students matter,’ and they yelled back ‘All students matter.’ Their signs said ‘Education for all,’ but how can you say ‘Education for all’ and not support a more inclusive education system for Black and brown students?” More →

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The Bean Comes Back to Second Avenue, But When Will Its Customers Return?

(Photos: Daniel Maurer)

A little over a year after it closed its doors, The Bean has reopened its Second Avenue location, bringing a neighborhood staple back to NYU students and other East Village locals. The coffee shop’s reopening on Nov. 18 was the result of a rent break brought on by the pandemic, but with a second wave of COVID-19 threatening to hit New York City, it remains to be seen how long the silver lining will gleam.  More →

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Can a Team of Volunteers Light Up Chinatown This Winter?

(Photos: Bessie Liu)

On a sunny afternoon in Manhattan’s Chinatown, masked residents can be seen wandering the streets, chatting with friends. In the alleyways, a handful of customers are seated at outdoor dining tables. The once deserted streets of Chinatown have come back to life. But local advocates believe the area could be more inviting after dark, and they’re hoping to brighten it up with hundreds of lanterns. More →

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More Are Fostering Cats During the Pandemic, But Are Skittish About Adopting

Heather Ha’s current foster cat, Luna. (Photo: Heather Ha)

When New York City went into lockdown mid-March, many people turned toward furry companions to keep them company during uncertain times.

The number of people who applied to foster pets has increased dramatically. According to a PetPoint report, the number of cats and dogs who have joined the foster network has increased by 6 percent and 13 percent respectively from the previous year. The ASPCA saw a 70 percent increase in the number of foster applicants for cats and dogs.  More →

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An Especially Cold Winter Lies Ahead For NYC’s Homeless

The Bowery Mission. (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

Earlier this month, MTA track inspectors came upon the remains of a middle-aged man in a subway tunnel near the Wall Street station. Officials suspected the deceased was a homeless person electrocuted by the third rail while seeking refuge underground. As temperatures drop, more and more New Yorkers are reportedly seeking shelter in the tunnels, illuminating the complex difficulties of contending with homelessness in the cold amid a pandemic. More →