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See The Sketchbook Project’s New, ‘More Intimate’ Doodler Heaven

(Photo by Kavitha Surana)

(Photo by Kavitha Surana)

Williamsburg fave The Sketchbook Project is riding high–they recently hit 35,000 sketchbooks (that’s a lot of doodles) and they’ve also finally re-opened their storefront, the Brooklyn Art Library, in a new, bigger location at 28 Frost Street.

As we reported back in February, the move from North 3rd Street was partly pushed by a rent hike, but it also represents a shift in culture for the Brooklyn Art Library. Of course, they’re still sticking to the core model of inviting anyone and everyone (for a $25 fee) to fill out a Moleskine sketchbook, adding their doodles and dreams to the collection forevermore.

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Owner of Bowery Bank Building to Pay $7 Million for Art Tax Evasion

Germania Bank (Photo by Scott Lynch)

Germania Bank (Photo by Scott Lynch)

Aby J. Rosen, owner of the gloriously graffitied Germania Bank building at 190 Bowery (soon to be outfitted as a high-end office building for fashion agencies and archives) is in the news today for something other than his disruptive real estate moves on landmarked buildings (in case you forgot, he also pissed off preservationists two years ago, when he displaced The Four Seasons restaurant and its Picasso curtain painting from the Seagram Building).

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4 Readings: Whingeing About Work, Surveying the Surveillance State, and More

WEDNESDAY

daveDave Isay presents Callings: The Purpose and Passion of Work
May 4 at 7:30 p.m. at Greenlight Bookstore, 686 Fulton Street.
Feeling unmotivated at work lately? Find some inspiration in Callings: The Purpose and Passion of Work, the new book out by Storycorps founder Dave Isay. Born 13 years ago, the oral-history project’s intimate interviews have grown to be a mainstay of American public life and podcasting. The new book draws upon audio interviews of average Americans toiling in the trenches of the nation’s workforce (public defenders, salmon slicers, science teachers and more) to try to understand what motivates people in their work every day and how they got there. Some of the storytellers themselves will speak at the event.

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Los Sures, a Time Capsule of Bygone Williamsburg, Gains Wider Distribution

via Metrograph

via Metrograph

Couldn’t get enough of Los Sures, the time capsule documentary of life in Puerto Rican Williamsburg back in 1984? You weren’t alone. The film, originally slated to run a week at Metrograph, the Lower East Side’s new arthouse film mecca, grossed $25,000 its first week and was extended for a second week. Playing mostly full houses, it eventually netted a holy-moly $60,000.

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Meet Fabrice Grinda, the Minimalist in the $6 Million LES Penthouse

(Photo by Kavitha Surana)

(Photo by Kavitha Surana)

As he rang in 2015, Fabrice Grinda, a 41-year-old tech entrepreneur from France, took stock of his life. He’d been living out of suitcases for the past four years, globetrotting and swinging between upscale hotels and top-notch Airbnbs. He decided it was time to “partially re-materialize.” Not settle down with a white picket fence (horrors!) — nothing drastic — but simply find a simple New York landing pad he could call his own.

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A Rom-Com Set During Superstorm Sandy Taps the ‘Quirky, Diverse East Village Fantasia’

MINA-RUDY-BLACKOUT

If you were living downtown in 2013, you probably remember the strange suspended week of superstorm Sandy. Maybe you lined up at a pay phone, or held up your iPad at that weird 3G oasis on Houston Street, or scooped up half-melted ice cream at the deli, or drank warm beer with your neighbors on Halloween. The storm wreaked havoc downtown (and caused much more destruction in other areas of the city), but for many people in secure locations, it was also a respite from the constant stream of tweets, emails and phone calls, and a chance to reflect, reconnect, and maybe even hook up (just think of the many kids named “Sandy” nine months later).

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Lawyer Becomes Gallerist, Sets Up ‘Hometown’ in Bushwick

(Photo by Kavitha Surana)

(Photo by Kavitha Surana)

Years ago, Adam Yokell was sitting in the art library of London’s Victoria and Albert museum, applying for an LSAT course.

Maybe it wasn’t the most likely place for a future lawyer to begin his career, but then again he didn’t become just any lawyer–until recently, he was the in-house counsel for Artsy, an online platform that connects artists and galleries with collectors. And now he’s striking out on his own to follow a long-time goal, opening a small gallery called Hometown in Bushwick.

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New Supertall Joining Extell on the Waterfront Draws Resident Ire

Courtesy JDS/SHoP

Courtesy JDS/SHoP

The area known as Two Bridges, below the Lower East Side, melting into Chinatown and hemmed in by the waterfront, has long been defined by its mix of mid-rise low-income public housing and affordable housing buildings. Now, within a matter of years it will suddenly have at least two towering skyscrapers in its midst.

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WNYC’s Gentrification Podcast Is a Wrap, But the Conversation Continues IRL

via WNYC

via WNYC

If you care about the gold rush sweeping Brooklyn and you haven’t been listening to WNYC’s There Goes the Neighborhood podcast…well, you must be living under a rock (or maybe in Tribeca). The eight-episode capsule podcast, hosted by The Nation‘s Kai Wright, is required listening. From studying landlord and developer tactics to understanding people’s complicated relationships with their homes and neighborhoods, it goes beyond the constant stream of tenant harassment cases to really try to make sense of the historical and social context around the recent developments in the changing the city.

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De Blasio Makes It Rain, Pours More Money Into East River Flood Protection

We all remember when superstorm Sandy plunged the East Village into darkness after a 14-foot storm surge caused an explosion at the ConEd station (in fact, there’s a movie out Friday set during that very historical moment in 2011). Luckily, we haven’t seen any storms of that scale since, but Mayor Bill de Blasio isn’t taking any chances. Today he announced more funding for the city’s climate resiliency plan as part of the 2017 city budget. The waterfront plans aren’t just going to protect Manhattan from more flooding– they’ll also double as a huge new public space. 
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