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Reading: Finding Masculinity

Don’t miss a night of readings from Finding Masculinitya new collection of essays from scientists, teachers, fathers, veterans and artists who share how being visible as the masculine humans they identify as has developed, changed, and evolved their sense of masculinity. The book focuses on the many facets of life that are affected by transitioning to a transgender man, including one’s career, emotional and spiritual life, family, medical community and relationships.Finding Masculinity - Female to Male Transition i-large.jpg

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On Andy Warhol: Wayne Koestenbaum in Conversation with Stephen Koch

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Discover an Andy Warhol who is “anything but the removed observer of most popular accounts” with critic, poet and CUNY professor Wayne Koestenbaum, whose writing style has been described as “an impossible lovechild from a late-night, drunken three-way between Joan Didion, Roland Barthes, and Susan Sontag.” He’ll be joined by Stephen Koch, author of Stargazer: The Life, World and Films of Andy Warhol, for an in-depth discussion about the enigmatic pop artist.

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An Ecclectic Evening of Poetry and Prose

Brooklyn-based writer Matthew Hodges hosts an evening of readings with a crew of exciting new voices.Lauren Keils is a Brooklyn-based poet (and painter and possibly a psychadelic singer and definitely an amateur taxidermist) from Detroit.Zan de Parry, too, hails from Michigan. Elizabeth Mikesch is the owner of Brest Pressand the author of Niceties, “a subversive text of lingual dissonance in which vocality precedes sense-making operations.” May-Lan Tan—a young poet whose first book was deemed “an excellent debut about loners and outcasts” by The Guardian—will also be reading, as will Beth Steidle, whose recently published The Static Herd (a starkly lyrical meditation on death) earned praise from Heavy Feather Review.

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Reading: Love Comes Later With Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar

Love Comes Later is one of the first English language novels to be set in Qatar, and has become one of a long list of books to be banned in that country. Doha-based author Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar researched and wrote the novel in Qatar, but will not get to see it reach shelves there despite the fact that the book is hardly overtly political or controversial. Rather, the plot centers on an arranged engagement between two reluctant cousins, and the love triangle that develops when one of the betrothed falls for someone else. The novel interrogates the connections between South Asian and Arab cultures and the oppressive potential of cultural expectations. “Rajakumar pulls back the veil on life in Qatar to reveal a glimpse of Muslim life rarely seen by Westerners,” as per Kirkus Reviews. Join Rajakumar for a reading from the novel.