genesis p-orridge

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Wake Up and Smell the Poppins at Supercalifragilisticexpialadocious

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious_inviteL copyTackling the topic of feminism is a monumental task for any art exhibition, let alone one that fits inside a downtown art space called White Box–which you already know, or maybe just guessed, is not all that enormous. Even if the curator had the MoMA to herself, a show like this would require some epic planning. And from the viewer’s perspective? Yeah right. Seeing everything in one go would be require an Odyssean attention span which, let’s be real, just doesn’t exist anymore.

So when curator Lara Pan was commissioned by the non-profit art space White Box to put together a show “about women,” she and her co-curator Ruben Natal-San Miguel came up with Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious (on view through January 21), a 27-piece show that fits neatly within a realm of feminism she knows well. She may have felt compelled to whittle down the larger theme, but she managed to keep the feeling of an epic, history-sweeping, time-spanning, half-the-human-race, cross-culturally inclusive narrative. At the same time, the show defies what we’ve come to expect from women’s art exhibitions: those one-note, temporary deviations from the default (i.e. white men) that are plagued by tokenism, tiptoeing, stale themes, and work that’s about as revolutionary as a closet full of pantsuits.

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Week in Film: Love Like ’70s Pulp Revenge Cinema, an Idiotic Prophecy Most Accurate, and More


What’s Revenge?
Saturday October 8 and Saturday October 15, 10 pm at Spectacle: $5

I trust that most of us here can agree that far too many films about sex and relationships are heteronormative, replete with sexist tropes, gender binarism, the male perspective, and/or female archetypes that are just godawful and tend to make those of us with brains in our heads question whether we are just totally insane for feeling zero identification with these boring storylines and banal characters. So we either play along, grumble and complain, laugh darkly, develop a self-depleting tick like methodically tearing out each and every hair on our heads, or avoid any sort of TV/film portrayals of romance and relationshits as if they were a postulating butt rash.

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In Bight of the Twin, Genesis P-Orridge Travels to Benin, the Birthplace of Voodoo

Genesis Breyer P-Orridge in "Bight of the Twin," a new documentary from Hazel Hill McCarthy III

Genesis Breyer P-Orridge in “Bight of the Twin,” a new documentary from Hazel Hill McCarthy III

I’ll be the first to admit it, my total “experience” with voodoo involves not much more than occasional trips to my local botanica to refresh my incense supply, and subsequently stressing about my decision to go with the “Fast Luck Egyptian Money Drawing” candle (*alleged) over the Reverse Action Evil Eye one (*also alleged). Which is to say, I have exactly no actual experience. I’m totally gonna let the lovely Haitian shop owners dress my devotional candle of choice with what looks like confetti and smells like potpourri, because why not? In my understanding, it’s best to cover all your bases on the warpath to riches, and I’ll take any and all of the help that the Supernatural Powers That Be, whoever they may be, are willing to give me.

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Talismans, Cut-Ups, and Altered States at New Genesis P-Orridge Show

"Listen Here" installation at "Try to Altar Everything" (Photo: Nicole Disser)

“Listen Here” installation at “Try to Altar Everything” (Photo: Nicole Disser)

For now, the glowing orange portholes carved out of the walls at the Rubin Museum are only sparsely occupied with curious objects: a panda bear figurine clutching a heart-shaped thing, a crinkled-up clip-on ID card. As part of the namesake installation at Genesis Breyer P-Orridge’s freshly opened show, “Try to Altar Everything,” these tiny viewing cubbies, resembling Japanese micro-hotelrooms for ants, serve as temporary homes for individual “offerings,” which the artist started accepting on Friday.

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Open Wide, Here’s Your Plate Full of Four Tasty Shows

(Flyer via Trans-Pecos)

(Flyer via Trans-Pecos)

A Pre-Spring Solstice Weekend With Psychic TV 
Saturday March 12 (7 pm) through Sunday March 13 (5 pm) at Trans-Pecos: $20/ night, $35 both days, Saturday after-party entry $10 after midnight, Sunday after-party entry $10 after 10 pm

Genesis P-Orridge has had a busy, well, life– but lately the founder of Psychic TV and Throbbing Gristle has threatened to surpass even h/er own level of hyper-productivity. Just 24 hours after opening h/er new interactive art exhibition, Try to Altar Everything, at the Rubin Museum on Friday, the artist is asking that people bring objects of significance to contribute to the “shamanic space” (stemming from ideas about the universe s/he soaked up during several visits to Nepal over the years). P-Orridge will post up at Trans-Pecos for a two-day vernal equinox party. Sure, it’s about a week ahead of schedule but it’s undeniably spring-like right now, and who wouldn’t want an extended celebration in their lives right now, anyway? Actually, the two-day marathon was originally scheduled for January,  and was cancelled when Jonas hit and ruined literally everything. Ah, sweet revenge on winter.

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Genesis Breyer P-Orridge Wants You to Try and Altar Everything

(Art Work by Genesis P-Orridge)

(Art Work by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge)

There might be no other artist breathing today who lives their art as deeply and consistently as Genesis Breyer P-Orridge. The renowned occultist and “wrecker of civilization” has repeatedly taken a spiky club to the larger culture, even to h/er own body, as a means of dismembering ingrained mores. S/he did this first as a founding member of Throbbing Gristle– a band whose embrace of bristling, harsh sounds and antagonistic politics sought to dishevel the status quo, and sparked the inception of industrial music– and subsequently with Psychic TV. With h/er new exhibition, Try to Altar Everything (opening March 11), P-Orridge will transform the Rubin Museum into a participatory “shamanic space,” inspired by h/er travels to the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal. “We’re developing this bouncing conversation between the mundane and the sacred,” Genesis explained. “Everything can be sacred, and if you start to look for the sacred, you will find it.”

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A Little Bird Told Me: Aleister Crowley and Genesis P-Orridge in Occult Art Show

Carol Bove "Legal Status of the Moon," 2015  (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Carol Bove “Legal Status of the Moon,” 2015 (Photo: Nicole Disser)

“Ordinary morality is only for ordinary people,” Aleister Crowley once said. That maxim echoes inside the walls of a new exhibit at 80WSE, Language of the Birds: Occult and Art. Even now, when dabbling in the occult has become morally ambiguous rather than universally derided, the work shown at NYU Steinhardt’s gallery is far from ordinary. Spanning the beginning of the last century to the present day, its authors range from avant-garde filmmakers (Kenneth Anger), to spiritual philosophers (Aleister Crowley), to industrial music makers (Genesis Breyer P-Orridge), and “just” plain artists (Kiki Smith). Somehow these varied participants share a similar worldview, which they’ve communicated (at various points in time) through symbols and talismans that have remained fairly static throughout.

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Language of the Birds: Occult and Art

Peter Lamborn Wilson, "Leonora and Loplop," 2015  (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Peter Lamborn Wilson, “Leonora and Loplop,” 2015 (Photo: Nicole Disser)

“Ordinary morality is only for ordinary people,” Aleister Crowley once said. That maxim echoes inside the walls of a new exhibit at 80WSELanguage of the Birds: Occult and Art. Even now, when dabbling in the occult has become morally ambiguous rather than universally derided, the work shown at NYU Steinhardt’s gallery is far from ordinary. Spanning the beginning of the last century to the present day, its authors range from avant-garde filmmakers (Kenneth Anger), to spiritual philosophers (Aleister Crowley), to industrial music makers (Genesis Breyer P-Orridge), and “just” plain artists (Kiki Smith). Somehow these varied participants share a similar worldview, which they’ve communicated (at various points in time) through symbols and talismans that have remained fairly static throughout.

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Shows: Take a Big Bite of Kraut, Then Cool Off With Icey Cold Wave

11698843_873616136061911_3848402837853723010_oGigawatts Fest is happening this weekend, which is great and all — I need my pop fix as much as the next guy. But sometimes I want to be surrounded by sounds that whinge, “I’mmmmmmm differentttttt.” If that’s you, too, get thee to these smaller shows where you’ll find acts that don’t exactly qualify as festival material, if you catch my drift.

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Genesis Breyer P-Orridge’s Astounding New Book: ‘It’s a Mini-Retrospective Exhibition of My Life’

(Photo: Sheila Rock)

With dog in Hackey in 1977. (Photo: Sheila Rock)

Throughout h/er entire career in art, music, film, and writing, Genesis Breyer P-Orridge has constantly evolved — no matter how non-liner that path may seem to outsiders. That life and journey has now been crystalized in a photographic autobiography, featuring over 350 candid and often previous unseen images from the artist’s personal archives.
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So Deck! Forget Vinyl, This Label Is Still Releasing Cassettes

Ryan Martin’s two-years-in-the-making collaboration with Italian noise composer Maurizio Bianchi, “As Strong As Death Is,” isn’t available on Spotify, or Bandcamp, or even CD. It was released today as a double cassette (yes, cassette) on his tape-centric label, Robert & Leopold.
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