film

No Comments

Greenpoint Filmmaker’s Christmas, Again Is Taking Sundance By Storm

movieposter

(Image courtesy of Obscured Pictures)

Director Charles Poekel knew he wanted a real Brooklyn Christmas tree stand for the backdrop of his first feature film, “Christmas, Again,” but tree salesmen are a tough crowd to get in with; he wasn’t sure how he was going to conduct research or get permission to film his low-budget flick. His solution? He became a bona fide tree salesman himself, setting up shop as McGolrick Trees for three cold Christmas seasons.
Keep Reading »

No Comments

This Week In Film: The Stoner Detective, Javanese Vibes, And Exploding Heads

Wow it’s been a whole week since we brought you a list of films, which means it’s time for another list of movies screening this weekend and beyond. We’ve brought you a whole bunch of films that are a little more mind-blowing than you might be used to– apparently there are some seriously mystical vibes in the moving image stratosphere right now.
Keep Reading »

No Comments

Nevermind Ghostbusters 3, the Film Industry Is Still Spooked About Women

Bushwick Film Festival

Sure, everyone’s psyched for the all-female Ghostbusters, but last Sunday, as part of the Bushwick Film Festival, a panel of women in the industry came together and agreed on something scary: there are not enough women being represented in films, TV, and behind the camera.
Keep Reading »

No Comments

Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Outline of a Screenplay for a Film about Saint Paul (in the Form of Notes for a Production Director)

Italian Pier Paolo Pasolini was a filmmaker (specializing in the grotesque and the subversive), poet, novelist, journalist, playwright, painter, actor, and public intellectual, as well as both a Catholic and a Marxist, and—finally—a murder victim. Despite clearly being a man of action, even Pasolini couldn’t do it all, and having written a screenplay for a film about St. Paul, the project fell by the wayside and remained unrealized at the time of the director’s demise (in 1975).

The poetic, revolutionary text has now been translated into English for the first time, and will here be read by New Yorker staff writer Hilton Als, among others. Philosopher Alain Badiou, who wrote the translation’s preface, notes of the project: “Pasolini’s wager is that the truth of which St. Paul is the divided bearer, the sacrificed militant, can make sense in the world of today, thus providing the latent universality of his thought.”

1 Comment

An Ambitious Look at the South Side, 'Still Not the Neighborhood You Want to Think It Is'

Living Los Sures, a collaborative work-in-progress documentary project by UnionDocs, is a multifaceted portrait of Williamsburg’s South Side that has been four years in the making. The ambitious project—selections of which are now on display at Fordham University’s Idliko Butler gallery—was inspired by Los Sures, Diego Echeverria’s 1984 feature documentary about the then-blighted Hispanic neighborhood. “Remarkably,” wrote Eleanor Mannikka of the film, “some hope and ambition and drive are still present in spite of the crime and grime that settles over the neighborhood like dust.”
Keep Reading »

No Comments

This Brooklyn Director Has a Cannes-Do Attitude

shortlived

A scene from Short Lived

Brooklyn-based director Michael Hobbs only ever imagined he’d have the opportunity to work with a dream team on his latest short film, Short Lived. But when Hobbs sent an email on a whim to Brooklyn-based director of photography Alexander Crowe, he got more than he bargained for. “I didn’t expect a reply because of his caliber, but he got back to me,” Hobbs says. “This was a really big deal.”
Keep Reading »

No Comments

An Evening with Nir Evron

As the Israel-Palestine conflict is once again splashed across the international press, there was never a better time to become familiar with the work of Nir Evron. The Israeli filmmaker has long been fascinated with the physical architecture of the conflict, and this latest work—Endurance—is the third in his “Architectural Trilogy.” Each of the films centers on one particular building: for Endurance, that building is Rawabi, a residential gated community that also happens to be Palestine’s largest building project. Escape the often biased, rushed analysis of the mainstream media, and immerse yourself in Evron’s controversial, contemplative meditations on the construction of social and political histories. After the screening, New Museum Curator Lauren Cornell will moderate a Q&A with the artist.

No Comments

Manhattan Film Festival

The Manhattan Film Festival was founded in 2006, and showcases the work of independent filmmakers in order to help them reach a broader audience. In 2013, it was named by Moviemaker magazine one of 25 “coolest film festivals in the world.” The MFF also prides itself on coming up with creative solutions to help filmmakers pursue their careers, including a Filmmaker Revenue Sharing Program. This year, the festival boasts an eclectic mix of features, documentaries and short films. See the schedule here.

No Comments

Labyrinth

Just Labrynth. You know you love it. And if you don’t know what I’m talking about, then you should probably go to this screening for reals. Because this is cultural knowledge you need—complete with David Bowie in full weirdo (read: Goblin King Jareth) regalia and Jennifer Connelly as a girl on the brink of womanhood. Also puppets. Lots of puppets.

No Comments

La Traviata

You may not be able to hustle up the cash for a quick jaunt to London’s Royal Opera House (or even, for that matter, to our very own Met) but that doesn’t mean you need be deprived of the wondrous, visceral, weirdly compelling force that is opera. This weekend, the Royal Opera House’s performance of Verdi’s La Traviata (Fallen Woman) comes to a screen near you. Based on the real life romance between Alexander Dumas and Marie Duplessis, this three-act spectacle centers on the doomed love between Paris’s most famous courtesan and the man for whom she abandons her luxurious, lascivious lifestyle. Spoiler: tuberculosis features prominently.

No Comments

Hated: G.G. Allin and the Murder Junkies

Punk rock sensation G.G. Allin was renowned for his outlandish live performance antics—which involved defecating on stage, self-mutilation, nudity, and attacking audience members. He typically ended sets smeared in various bodily fluids. Despite poor reviews, Allin attracted a cult following over his career, as he strived to inject a little danger into rock. He eventually died from a drug overdose while this 1993 biopic was in post-production. Hated was the first film from director Todd Phillips (Old School, Starsky & Hutch, The Hangover), and he will be present for a Q&A after the one-night-only screening.