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Scorsese Continues Little Italying LES For Irishman Shoot

Work continues apace as Orchard and Broome Streets turn into 1970s Little Italy for the upcoming filming of The Irishman. Directed by Martin Scorsese, the Netflix film stars Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Harvey Keitel and Joe Pesci.

Yesterday we showed you the replica of the original Umberto’s Clam House. The mob favorite, at 129 Mulberry Street, at Hester Street, was where gangster Joey Gallo met his fate. Era-correct yellow street signs that will be used for the film show the attention to detail Scorsese is famous for.

Many of the other faux storefronts also depict real businesses. Forzano Italian Imports and E. Rossi Italy Music & Book, from Friday’s story, were Mulberry Street mainstays back in the day.

Click through our slideshow to see the latest reveals.

(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

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(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

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(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

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Scorsese Transforms the LES Into ’70s Little Italy, For The Irishman

(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

This week Lower East Side hipsters may fret that the neighborhood’s invasion of piercing salons and beard-trimming shops has come to an end. Storefronts on Orchard and Broome Streets sport signs reminiscent of 1970s Little Italy. Signs for E. Rossi’s Italy Music & Book Co., Vitale Funeral Home, Hester Discount Hardware and others have popped up, seeming to herald a comeback for the mom-and-pop shops the man-bun crowd has shunned.

But don’t worry, the shops will be gone soon. The signs are props for the filming of The Irishman, the upcoming Netflix film that examines the disappearance of union boss Jimmy Hoffa in 1975. The flick stars mob drama heavyweights Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Harvey Keitel and Joe Pesci. It reunites De Niro and Keitel with Martin Scorsese, who directed the pair in another LES drama, 1973’s Mean Streets.

Based on the 2003 book I Heard You Paint Houses by Charles Brandt, The Irishman marks Scorsese’s long-awaited return to the gangster genre. Shooting began here in August and will continue through December, just in time for SantaCon to arrive.

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If 8th St. Became Jimi Hendrix Way, Would It Get More Crosstown Traffic?

An imagination of Jimi Hendrix Way (Frank Mastropolo)

In the mid-1960s, Jimi Hendrix honed his craft as a singer and guitarist in Greenwich Village clubs like the Gaslight Café, Trude Heller’s, and Café au Go Go. After a 1966 performance at the Café Wha?, Hendrix was persuaded to go to London and form the Jimi Hendrix Experience. He returned to New York a superstar. Hendrix moved to West 12th Street in 1969 and in 1970 built his most enduring Village legacy, Electric Lady Studios.

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Musicians Recall Dylan’s First Big Gig and 25 Years of Music History at Gerde’s Folk City

Gerde’s Folk City, on West Fourth Street. (Photo: New York University Archives Photograph Collection)

Greenwich Village in 1960 was ground zero for folk music. Beat poets of the ’50s gave way to folk singers in Village coffee houses like the Gaslight Café and Café Bizarre. Musicians gathered at the Kettle of Fish bar and Izzy Young’s Folklore Center, which sold books, records and instruments.

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Bob Dylan Is the Village Voice’s Final Cover Boy, But He Wasn’t the First to Record ‘Blowin’ in the Wind’

It is appropriate that the Village Voice ends its print run today with a photo of Bob Dylan on its cover. Like the Voice, which launched in 1955, Dylan also got his start in a Greenwich Village filled with coffee houses and small clubs that featured poetry readings and folk music.

As a member of the New World Singers, singer-guitarist Happy Traum was a regular on the Village music scene. This week Traum talked with us about Gerde’s Folk City, the West 4th Street club where Dylan played his first professional gig in April 1961. Traum recalled that before Dylan performed it on stage, he shared the lyrics to perhaps the best loved folk anthem: “Blowin’ in the Wind.”

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A Favorite Ghost Sign Quietly Vanishes in the East Village

Before. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Lanza’s Italian restaurant opened in 1904 at 168 First Ave., an East Village favorite until it closed in 2016. A regular customer, according to the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, was Carmine “Lilo” Galante, boss of the Bonanno crime family. Lanza’s had a reputation as a mob hangout since the Bonanno and Columbo families dined there.

For perhaps the entire life of Lanza’s, all its customers passed under a turn of the century ad for PN Corsets. The sign was there in 1993 when Woody Allen used Lanza’s for a restaurant scene in Manhattan Murder Mystery. In 2015 we featured the PN ad, painted on the adjoining building, in a collection of neighborhood ghost signs.

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50 Years Ago: The Summer of Love Brings Pot, Protests and Psychedelic Rock to the East Village

Tompkins Square Park
(Photo: James Jowers)

“As the hour grew late and working people around Tompkins Square Park began turning out the lights on Memorial Day 1967, police asked several hundred music lovers to turn down the volume of a guitar-and-bongo concert in the park,” reported the New York Daily News. “The crowd’s reply … was a barrage of bottles, bricks and fists that left seven officers injured.

“And thus began the Summer of Love.”

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A Look at Political Bling Before the ‘Make America Great’ Days

(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

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Buttons23

Buttons23

(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photos: Frank Mastropolo)

Political hype started long before those red MAGA hats. “Modern political buttons really started with the McKinley-Bryan election of 1896 and some of the early ones were amazingly colorful and detailed,” said Marty Kane, a collector, as he told us about the political memorabilia show that took place Sunday on the Lower East Side.

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An Insider’s Guide to the ‘Martin Scorsese’ Exhibit

Boxing gloves worn by Robert De Niro in

Boxing gloves worn by Robert De Niro in "Raging Bull"; recreation of boxing trunks for "Raging Bull." (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Prop television set, 1999. Scorsese was deeply influenced by Italian postwar cinema, which he watched on television as a child. He recreated his childhood television as a prop for his documentary

Prop television set, 1999. Scorsese was deeply influenced by Italian postwar cinema, which he watched on television as a child. He recreated his childhood television as a prop for his documentary "Il Mio Viaggio in Italia." (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Prop flowers from

Prop flowers from "Vertigo" (1958); Dried flowers, cotton ribbon, satin and plastic. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Fireman's helmet,

Fireman's helmet, "Gangs of New York." (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Box of 45 rpm records with inventory, 1955-1958. Scorsese collected these 45 rpm records when he was a young teenager living on Elizabeth Street in Little Italy. He used several of these songs in his films. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Box of 45 rpm records with inventory, 1955-1958. Scorsese collected these 45 rpm records when he was a young teenager living on Elizabeth Street in Little Italy. He used several of these songs in his films. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Robert De Niro's taxi driver's license c. 1975. To prepare for his role as Travis Bickle in

Robert De Niro's taxi driver's license c. 1975. To prepare for his role as Travis Bickle in "Taxi Driver," De Niro became a licensed taxi driver in New York City. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Scorsese family dining room table and chairs. This dining room table is a setting between Scorsese and his parents in the documentary

Scorsese family dining room table and chairs. This dining room table is a setting between Scorsese and his parents in the documentary "Italianamerican." (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Costume worn by Cate Blanchett as Katharine Hepburn in

Costume worn by Cate Blanchett as Katharine Hepburn in "The Aviator." (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Costume worn by Leonardo DiCaprio as Amsterdam in

Costume worn by Leonardo DiCaprio as Amsterdam in "Gangs of New York." (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Storyboards for

Storyboards for "Raging Bull" drawn by Scorsese.

Martin Scorsese with his parents, Catherine and Charles Scorsese, in Corona, Queens, c.1948 Martin Scorsese Collection, New York. Courtesy of Sikelia Productions / Deutsche Kinemathek (Berlin).

Martin Scorsese with his parents, Catherine and Charles Scorsese, in Corona, Queens, c.1948 Martin Scorsese Collection, New York. Courtesy of Sikelia Productions / Deutsche Kinemathek (Berlin).

Scorsese and Robert De Niro on the set of Taxi Driver. Credit: Sikelia Productions.

Scorsese and Robert De Niro on the set of Taxi Driver. Credit: Sikelia Productions.

Storyboard for “The Eternal City,” an imagined epic film about Ancient Rome, drawn by an eleven-year-old Martin Scorsese. Pencil and crayon on paper. Martin Scorsese Collection, New York. Photo: Marian Stefanowski, courtesy of Deutsche Kinemathek (Berlin).

Storyboard for “The Eternal City,” an imagined epic film about Ancient Rome, drawn by an eleven-year-old Martin Scorsese. Pencil and crayon on paper. Martin Scorsese Collection, New York. Photo: Marian Stefanowski, courtesy of Deutsche Kinemathek (Berlin).

Scorsese's copy of the book

Scorsese's copy of the book "Silence" and the camera slate for the film. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Props from

Props from "Silence." Fathers Sebastião Rodrigues (Andrew Garfield) and Francisco Garupe (Adam Driver) secretly bring these religious objects with them into Japan to minister to the Japanese Christians in "Silence." Rodrigues uses the notebook and pens to chronicle his experiences. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

"Martin Scorsese," Museum of the Moving Image December 11, 2016–April 23, 2017. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

On the eve of the release of Martin Scorsese’s latest film Silence, a new exhibition traces the director’s career from its birth in Little Italy. Although Scorsese moved from his parents’ apartment on Elizabeth Street decades ago he has said, “A lot of what I learned about life came from there.” The exhibition at Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria tells the director’s story through approximately 600 artifacts, most drawn from Scorsese’s personal collection.

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‘Ramones Way’ Is Now a Street Outside the Band’s Rock ‘n’ Roll High School

L to R: Council Member Karen Koslowitz, Joey Ramone's brother Mickey Leigh, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

L to R: Council Member Karen Koslowitz, Joey Ramone’s brother Mickey Leigh, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

For Ramones fans, Forest Hills High School in Queens is as seminal a site as performance venues CBGB and Max’s Kansas City. The school is where the Ramones – Joey, Dee Dee, Johnny and Tommy – first met. On Sunday, the intersection in front of the school at 67th Avenue and 110th Street was renamed The Ramones Way to honor the late pioneers of punk rock.

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For the Record, J&R Music World Is Not Actually Back in the Needles Business

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Last week was Record Store Day. This week is record store back in the day. This ghost sign was recently revealed during the demolition of the J&R Music World strip of stores on Park Row. The pitch for “tapes” probably dates the sign to the mid-sixties but vinyl was still king as “needles” takes the top rung. The word “stereo” is obscured above the cool music notes.

Click here for more ghost sings around town.