literature

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’90s Style Was ‘Exciting’ (Maybe) But the Fashion World Is a Horrible Place

Things you can learn at this weeks stellar readings and talks.

Thursday, August 28

That’s When the Knives Come Down with Dolan Morgan
Greenpointer Dolan Morgan will read on home turf for the Brooklyn launch of his debut collection That’s When the Knives Come Down. A surrealist glance at cities, relationships and lives gone awry, the stories are billed as simultaneously “absurd, harrowing, and inimitable.” According to Catherine Lacey, “Dolan Morgan queers the every day and leaves a sinister domestic scene behind.” He’ll be joined in discussion by B.C. Edwards (The Aversive Clause) and Chelsea Hodson (Pity the Animal).
7pm, WORD Books (126 Franklin St, Greenpoint), FREE, Facebook RSVP here
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Readings from Yale Writers’ Conference Faculty

The Yale Writers’ Conference is a rigorous program for “the committed writer” held on the Ivy League University’s leafy-gothic campus. Sounds somewhat terrifying, if intellectually stimulating. Now, however, you can experience the collective genii of the faculty without the hefty tuition fee. JoinEileen PollackTerence HawkinsTeddy Wayne, and David Gorin for an evening of letters, in the markedly less intimidating environs of the KGB Bar. Creative writing is SO MUCH MORE CREATIVE when there is vodka.

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Stitched up: The Anti-Capitalist Book of Fashion with Tansy Hoskins

And if you thought fashion-talk might offer some light relief from the horrors of the death railway, think again. Tansy Hoskins’ recently released book Stitched Up: The Anti-Capitalist Book of Fashiondelves into the grimy underbelly of the beauty-obsessed industry: exposing the class division, gender stereotyping and wasteful consumption plaguing the world of fashion. If you own a closet and keep garments in it, it behooves you to take note of this insightful indictment of the distorting priorities of capitalism.

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An Ecclectic Evening of Poetry and Prose

Brooklyn-based writer Matthew Hodges hosts an evening of readings with a crew of exciting new voices.Lauren Keils is a Brooklyn-based poet (and painter and possibly a psychadelic singer and definitely an amateur taxidermist) from Detroit.Zan de Parry, too, hails from Michigan. Elizabeth Mikesch is the owner of Brest Pressand the author of Niceties, “a subversive text of lingual dissonance in which vocality precedes sense-making operations.” May-Lan Tan—a young poet whose first book was deemed “an excellent debut about loners and outcasts” by The Guardian—will also be reading, as will Beth Steidle, whose recently published The Static Herd (a starkly lyrical meditation on death) earned praise from Heavy Feather Review.

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‘It’s Such an Intense Social Scene’: Talking Bushwick Nightz With Ms. Bushwick Daily

(Photo: Kirsten O'Regan)

Bushwick Nightz on Knickerbocker Ave (Photo: Kirsten O’Regan)

When Dallas Athent, fashion and shopping editor of Bushwick Daily, approached editor-in-chief Katarina Hybenova with the idea of putting together a collection of Bushwick short stories, Hybenova didn’t hesitate. “I was totally psyched,” she recalls. “I said yes in like three seconds.” Now that dream of a couple months back has come to fruition, in the form of a slim, attractive volume entitled Bushwick Nightz. Released by Bushwick Daily and Catopolis (Athent’s publishing venture), the book promises to introduce the reader to “the famed neighborhood that everyone’s been talking about.”
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Storytelling and the Line Between Fact and Fiction

Both R. Clifton Spargo and Anne Ream are Chicago-based writers with recently published non-fiction books;Beautiful Fools: The Last Affair of Zelda and Scott Fitgerald and Lived Through This: Listening to the Stories of Sexual Violence Survivorsrespectively. Join the writers in a discussion about these books, and the fraught connection between fact and fiction.

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Celebrate Bloomsday and Friday the 13th With These Talks and Readings

friday
Who ever said that writing, at its best, is a lonely life? We’ve got your weekly round-up of bibliovents that prove once in a while writers do actually jerk themselves away from their laptops to good effect. On the books this week are a wide variety of events, from a reading where you can get tattooed while soaking up some Alt-Lit vibes, to a panel discussion of the King of Pop led by his brave biographer.
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