iggy pop

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Karaoke Bacchae

As the name implies, Karaoke Bacchae is a take on Euripides’ classic tragedy, The Bacchae. This reimagining takes place not in ancient Greece, but in a karaoke bar during the Stanley Cup. And instead of witnessing a fleshy Dionysus blob around in a flowing robe, we’re treated to an appropriately shirtless Iggy Pop (well, an actor playing Iggy Pop, at least) as a not-too-far-fetched stand-in for the party god.
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Karaoke Bacchae

As the name implies, Karaoke Bacchae is a take on Euripides’ classic tragedy, The Bacchae. This reimagining takes place not in ancient Greece, but in a karaoke bar during the Stanley Cup. And instead of witnessing a fleshy Dionysus blob around in a flowing robe, we’re treated to an appropriately shirtless Iggy Pop (well, an actor playing Iggy Pop, at least) as a not-too-far-fetched stand-in for the party god.
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From the Factory to Clublandia, Two Exhibitions Will Bring You Back to the Good Ol’ Days

The Last Party exhibition at WhiteBox (Photo: Nicole Disser)

The Last Party exhibition at WhiteBox (Photo: Nicole Disser)

While wandering from gallery to gallery yesterday in the Lower East Side, soaking up a pair of museum-like nostalgia exhibitions focusing on at least one part if not all of a few-decades long span from Warhol’s Factory days through the ’90s club kid scene, I started thinking about a conversation I’d had with one JJ Brine, Satanic gallerist extraordinaire. Before JJ took off for Vanuatu (btw according to his Facebook page, he made it just fine), he explained he was departing indefinitely because he was frustrated with what he understood as New York City’s unusual fixation on the past at the expense of devoting energy to the future. I couldn’t have agreed more, but somehow The Last Party and Michael Alig’s appropriately-titled solo exhibition, Inside / Out succeed in drawing a line, however crooked, between the past and the present and making this nostalgia part of current existence. How? Well, I felt as though I could almost see myself in some of the blurry old party photos and even the creepy clown-like painted odes to various poisons of choice.

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Punks, Dunks and Free Beer at the Opening of This Photo Show

Henry Rollins from Black Flag.

Henry Rollins from Black Flag.

Before Pete Kuhns became the Village Voice’s sports photographer, he covered Seattle’s punk scene during the ’80s for the biweekly Seattle music newspaper The Rocket. The difference between documenting Black Flag and yellow flags isn’t as big as you’d think: Kuhns’s high-endorphin action shots of The Clash, X, Dead Kennedys, and Public Image Ltd are all printed in black-and-white for maximum drama, and there are plenty of fit, bare-chested men, if you’re into that.
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Blondie Checks Into the Chelsea Hotel For 40th Anniversary Photo Show

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

In a two-fold celebration of the 40th anniversary of Blondie’s formation and guitarist/co-founder Chris Stein’s photography book release, the Chelsea Hotel Storefront Gallery is hosting a week-long exhibition. The show features ephemera and photographs from Chris Stein/Negative: Me, Blondie, and the Advent of Punk as well as the work of other important photographers who were in and around the New York City punk scene of the ’70s and ’80s.
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Watch the House Videographers at CBGB Call Richard Hell a Crybaby

As you may have read over at Rolling Stone, Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong — in what’s sure to be one of the highlights of the CBGB Festival — are screening some of their rare late-70s and early-80s concert footage at Bowery Electric tonight, between performances by Cheetah Chrome of the Dead Boys, Syl Sylvain of the New York Dolls, and Glen Matlock of the Sex Pistols. We were lucky enough to have the authors of our weekly Nightclubbing column into the B+B Newsroom last Friday, along with Richard Boch, who’s working on a memoir of his time manning the door of the Mudd Club, and Pat Irwin, the guitarist for the Raybeats, 8 Eyed Spy and the B-52s, who spoke about his recently unearthed collaboration with Philip Glass.

If you missed Friday’s discussion, watch the replay above. Here’s what the gang had to say about Suicide (we spoke to Martin Rev of that band back in June) and the evolution of the Ramones.
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Nightclubbing | Richard Hell and The Voidoids, 1979

Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong continue sorting through their archives of punk-era concert footage as it’s digitized for the Downtown Collection at N.Y.U.’s Fales Library

(Photo: Nicole Batchelor Regne)

Well, it is officially Richard Hell month. His newly published book, “I Dreamed I Was A Very Clean Tramp,” has enjoyed a glowing review in The New York Times. There has been a flurry of personal appearances in bookstores and a string of interviews in print outlets and on the radio.

It has probably reminded this self-deprecating and essentially very private man why he dropped from the public eye to begin with. The tension between his introversion and the will to perform has always been Hell’s biggest conundrum. And what better way to help relive that dichotomy than a book tour? Maybe it’s a form of therapy. We have the feeling he would rather chew glass.
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Nightclubbing | Iggy Does Sinatra

Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong continue sorting through their archives of punk-era concert footage as it’s digitized for the Downtown Collection at N.Y.U.’s Fales Library.

Time’s a funny thing, especially where musicians are concerned. If the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Rolling Stones doesn’t scare you, perhaps the realization that we’ve shared nearly 36 years with Bono and 29 with Madonna will.

Still, it’s a little surprising that a mere 21 years separates the release of “Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely” in 1958 and the above video of Iggy Pop covering the LP’s iconic track, “One for My Baby,” at Hurrah’s in 1979. At first glance, the culture wars of the ’60s would seem to render irrelevant the bars, broads and bruisers ethos that Ol’ Blue Eyes represented. But for the generation that made up the original punks, those childhood memories of cigarette smoke, parents’ late nights and Sinatra’s music ran deep. More →