feminism

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How Kate Bolick Got Off the Conveyor Belt and Embraced Spinsterism

(Photo: Willy Somma)

(Photo: Willy Somma)

In 2011, Kate Bolick touched off a heated debate with her confessional Atlantic article “All the Single Ladies,” which described her experience breaking up with her “loyal, kind” boyfriend of three years, assuming someone new would come along, only to find herself still unattached at 39 and dealing with the stigma and fears that come with singledom. Her first book, Spinster, tells the story of what happened when she embraced being single. It interweaves her personal life with historical context brought to life by five single ladies who were reveling in their independence long before Beyonce wrote the anthem.
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Lena Dunham Thinks Catcalls Are a Reason to Love New York

(Photo: Anna Silman)

(Photo: Anna Silman)

Lena Dunham’s new memoir, Not That Kind of Girl, is written with just the sort of unabashed honesty and self-depricating wit you’d expect from the voice of her generation — or at least, “the voice of a generation.” And it also reveals the extent to which her personal experiences — some of them , some of them hilarious — have seeped into her work.
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A Big Egg, Big Bees, and Even Bigger Data

All subjects you can contemplate at this week’s thrilling selection of readings and talks. 

Friday, September 5

We, The Outsiders Opening Reception
We, The Outsiders is an art exhibition that explores several perplexing questions: “Can it be said that art has a consciousness of its own? And if such a consciousness were independent of us, where would it place us in relation to itself?” I have no idea what that means, but I do know that the exhibition revolves around a gigantic egg—which probes, like the classic chicken-and-the-egg conundrum (I prosaically assume), where consciousness begins and ends when it comes to art. More →

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Zakia Salime: Gender and Sexuality in the Arab Uprisings

Zakia Salime is a scholar of sociology and women and gender studies, whose work focuses on the fascinating intersection of feminist and Islamist politics. Her bookBetween Feminism and Islam: Human Rights and Sharia Law in Morocco (2011) examines the interplay between global concepts of human rights and localised alternatives. In so doing, the study reveals how these complex negotiations have led to the feminization of the Islamist movement one the one hand, and the Islamization of the feminist movement on the other. If you’re sick of reading simplistic arguments about the subjugation or otherwise of Muslim women, Salime is a breath of fresh air. Her work forgoes the common conception of Islam and feminism as inherently antagonistic doctrines, and reframes Muslim women as agents negotiating global policies and building alternative understandings of rights.

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White Lung at Saint Vitus

Feminist punk is having a moment, and White Lung is right in the mix. With this show, the Canadian band releases its third album, Deep Fantasy, which has been getting lots of positive press. Lead singer Mish Way has a thing for Courtney Love, and it’s obvious that Hole is a big influence on this latest release.

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Don’t Tell This Artist to Smile When You Visit Her Studio This Weekend

(Photo: Kirsten O'Regan)

(Photo: Kirsten O’Regan)

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh is not what you would call strident—an obnoxious word too often (smirklingly) associated with women who care about gender equality. The artist responsible for the Stop Telling Women to Smile project is polite and soft-spoken, and she also happens to be wearing a t-shirt that proudly reads, “Feminist as Fuck.”
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