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Hungry For Stink? Sorry, L7: Pretend We’re Dead Is No Stinker

Pretty much exactly two years ago, we told you about L7: Pretend We’re Dead, the Kickstarter-funded documentary about the ’90s grunge band. The doc is being released on VOD and DVD on October 13, but first it’ll screen at Nitehawk on October 5. If the words “shitlist” or “wargasm” mean anything to you, you’ll want to watch this on the big screen, with a beer in hand, because it’s an awesome blast from the past.

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Join Nick Zinner and James Murphy As They Remember the Good Ol’ Days of NYC Rock

In an excerpt from Lizzy Goodman’s new oral history of New York’s rock scene during the aughts, James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem calls Is This It, by the Strokes, his “record of the decade.” That’s high praise coming from “Mr. Soundsystem.” If you want to call him on it, he’ll be at Strand tomorrow, May 23, talking about the book with Goodman and with another star of the scene, Nick Zinner of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.

The excerpt from Meet Me in the Bathroom: Rebirth and Rock and Roll in New York City, 2001–2011, posted by Vulture last week, deals with the Strokes and their drama with Ryan Adams, Albert Hammond Jr’s heroin habit, and that $600,000 Heineken ad they turned down. As you can guess from the title, the Strokes factor heavily into the book, but the oral history also delves into The Yeah Yeah Yeahs, LCD Soundsystem, TV on the Radio, Interpol, The White Stripes, Kings of Leon, The National, The Moldy Peaches, Mooney Suzuki, Vampire Weekend, Fischerspooner, Franz Ferdinand, MGMT, The Hives, The Kills, The Vines, and all those other The bands that were, at various times, said to be “the next Strokes.” According to the selling copy, the book touches not just on the New York scene, but also “the cultural forces that shaped it, from the Internet to a booming real estate market that forced artists out of the Lower East Side to Williamsburg.”

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‘Desert X’ Plants Richard Prince and Other Artists in the Middle of Nowhere

Phillip K Smith III

If you’ve ever been out to the California desert for a sound bath at the Integratron, you know it’s filled with wacky art: at the Joshua Tree Outdoor Museum you can see a tower of toilet bowls and other wacky installations that Noah Purifoy– an “outsider” artist in the literal sense of the word– installed in the middle of nowhere over the course of 15 years. The 10 acres that were his canvas resemble a demented, decaying miniature golf course, or a Burning Man camp from years ago that never got burned.

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Go and Cut Your Hair at This Speakeasy-Esque ‘Anti-Salon’

(Photo courtesy of Diamond in the Rough)

Getting a haircut is never as simple as it sounds, especially in this city. You’re gonna need some help, unless you have one or more of the following: a) extremely liberal views on what counts as presentable b) a steady pair of hands, and c) tremendous flexibility á la the double-jointed faction of showtime kids. Good luck with that whole finding-a-stylist thing, by the way. If you’re searching within a two-mile radius of Greenpoint alone Yelp turns up 218 hair salons. On top of that, professional hair choppin’ is a fiercely competitive scene, and yet salons still manage to be painfully expensive and, in some cases, rather uncomfortable.

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Raymond Pettibon Breaks Out From Behind the Black Flag Bars, at New Museum Show

Lobby installation. (All art by Raymond Pettibon, all photos by Daniel Maurer)

Lobby installation. (All art by Raymond Pettibon, all photos by Daniel Maurer)

As he introduced the new Raymond Pettibon retrospective, New Museum artistic director Massimiliano Gioni admitted that he first became aware of the artist via his album covers for the Minutemen, Black Flag, and Sonic Youth. While we’re in confession mode: I still think of Pettibon mainly as the brother of Black Flag frontman Greg Ginn and the creator of the punk band’s iconic logo. But “A Pen of All Work,” which opens today, is further proof that the artist is far more than just a nihilistic doodler whose work has been “displayed” by skaters and punks sporting Six Pack t-shirts.

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Four Shows: Neon Spandex and Hair Metal Redux, Thurston Moore & John Zorn’s Dream Team

(Flyer via Union Pool/ Facebook)

(Flyer via Union Pool/ Facebook)

Ereptile Destruction, Growler, Shitkill
Tuesday November 22, 9 pm at Union Pool: $8

Once in a while, it helps to forget everything that’s happened to metal since nu metal hit, and take a trip back to our roots. Growler, a Brooklyn-based act that describes itself simply as “hard and loud” helps get us there, mainly by defying the trend toward increasingly humorless, doomed and/or blackened what-have-you. Lately, it feels like we’re so chin-deep in sludgy muck that it’s easy to forget where we started. Growler’s throwback sound plops us back in the early ’80s, with their high-pitched, falsetto, bordering on operatic vocals that recall Iron Maiden and Judas Priest.

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Cancel the TV Party, New Museum Is Having a Raymond Pettibon Retrospective

"Raymond Pettibon, No Title (This feeling is), 2011. Pen and ink on paper, 37 ¼ x 49 ½ in (94.6 x 125.7 cm). Private collection. Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles."

“Raymond Pettibon, No Title (This feeling is), 2011. Pen and ink on paper, 37 ¼ x 49 ½ in (94.6 x 125.7 cm). Private collection. Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles.”

It’s been two years since Raymond Pettibon’s surfer art went on display on the Upper East Side. Wait, wha? The artist who did the anarchic drawings that graced the cover of Black Flag albums and concert posters? On the Upper East Side? If that seemed weird, this makes more sense: downtown’s own New Museum has announced that, in February, it will put on the city’s first major museum survey of Pettibon’s work, featuring more than 700 drawings across three floors.

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Parsing Out a Pair of Proficient Pop Players, Peaches or Porches?

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(Photoshop by John Ambrosio, images via Peaches, Porches)

Now, I know that my excellent Photoshop skills have no doubt tricked you into believing that this (see above) is simply your average, un-doctored photo, but— and you’ll have to just take my word on this— it’s actually a composite of two promotional photos. The image on the right was used in ads for indie band Porches’ latest album, Pool, whereas the hotdog’d one on the left was used by performance artist/electronic musician Peaches.

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Dinosaur Jr. Shot a Video and Played a Surprise Free Show at House of Vans

(Photo: Daniel Maurer; all other photos courtesy of House of Vans)

Last time we caught Dinosaur Jr., during one of their 30th anniversary shows at Bowery Ballroom last year, a veritable Edison cluster of indie-rock luminaries (Kurt Vile, Evan Dando, Henry Rollins, and Kim Gordon and Lee Ranaldo from Sonic Youth, just to name a few) joined them on stage, and we wondered how Dinosaur would ever outdo it.
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Will the New Thurston Moore x Bernie Sanders Single Cause a Teenage Riot?

unnamedSafe to say Bernie Sanders now has a better chance of becoming Vampire Weekend’s new frontman than he does of becoming president, but we’re all for everyone’s favorite muppet staying in the race if it means new music from Thurston Moore. Joyful Noise Recordings, the Indianapolis-based label that has released limited editions by the Melvins and Dinosaur, Jr., is now giving away limited edition plexidiscs of the Sonic Youth frontman’s new single, “Feel It In Your Guts,” to those who contribute to Bernie’s campaign. The cover art is by Dave Kloc, one of the artists who participated in that roving art show where real-life Bernie met his muppet counterpart.
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