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The Brooding Long Goodbye Brings the Art of Brooklyn Film Festival to a Close

The trailer for Long Goodbye opens with a straight shot of a woman with shoulder-length hair and a jean jacket walking briskly away from the camera through the Morgan Ave subway station. We can’t see her face. One of the next scenes lingers on two friends chatting on a couch, with one of the guys uttering some language that feels rather stalker-y: “I drive around and clear my head and find myself parked outside of her place. I’m not going to do anything…I don’t know. Maybe she wants me to?”

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18th Annual Bicycle Film Festival Returns for the City’s Cycling Creatives

(Image credit: Bicycle Film Festival)

New York’s long-standing Bicycle Film Festival returns for a whopping eighteenth year between June 19-24 at Anthology Film Archives. It’s a whirlwind gathering of biking and film buffs that brings together the urban cycling community not only in New York, but also around the globe. The festival has hosted more than one million cycling enthusiasts in ninety-plus cities. More →

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The Early Word On Six NYC Films That Premiered at Sundance

A film still from Skate Kitchen by Crystal Moselle.
(Courtesy of Sundance Institute, photo by Ryan Parilla)

Skate Kitchen
Crystal Moselle won the grand jury prize at Sundance in 2015 for her shocking, Lower East Side-set documentary The Wolfpack. Skate Kitchen finds Moselle moving into the narrative space with another study of New York City misfits: an all-girl skateboarding crew. After she met the real-life skate squad on the subway, Moselle teamed up with the teenage women to develop a fictional story script surrounding their lives. The result is an immersive, dynamic coming of age centered around Camille (Rachelle Vinberg), a Long Island native whose initiation into the Skate Kitchen gang launches a summer of downtown debauchery and newfound camaraderie.
Critical Response: Variety says the “young women are mesmerizing to watch”; Hollywood Reporter says the script “often surprises, hinting at trauma that never arrives”; it’s “one of the more positive depictions of millennial community-building in recent cinema,” per IndieWire.
Distributor: Seeking distribution

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The Art of the Prank Unmasks Joey Skaggs, Father of Fake News

In Art of the Prank, set to release on October 9, longtime New Yorker and media hoaxer Joey Skaggs is gearing up to pull off the largest and most demanding hoax of his career.

Long before “fake news” or “alternative facts” had become a part of the public consciousness, Skaggs put together elaborate hoaxes to feed the media, like claiming to run a brothel for dogs or his portable confessional booth, to satirize the media’s gullibility and explore the media’s role in shaping and molding public opinion.

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Aesop Rock Returns to His Old Stomping Grounds For His Bushwick Civil-War Movie

Last month we shared a Q&A with the directors of Bushwick, about a Texas army invading the Brooklyn neighborhood. In honor of the movie’s release and his first time scoring a film, Aesop Rock is performing tomorrow night at Music Hall of Williamsburg. The hip-hop artist and producer– who was raised in Long Island, broke through in New York City, and recently moved to Oregon– has said he agreed to do the soundtrack in part because he “lived in Bushwick long ago.” Tickets to tomorrow’s show are $25 and Bushwick hits theaters and video on demand this Friday. Check out our Q&A with the film’s directors, Cary Murnion and Jon Milott, to find out why they set a civil war movie in the neighborhood, and what filming there was like. 

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Nitehawk Nods to Female Directors, Addressing the ‘Elephant in the Room’

(Photo: Signature Move)

Representation matters. But unsurprisingly, it’s still lacking in nearly all fields. Especially in Hollywood. Casts, directors and producers are overwhelmingly white and male. So much so that in 2015 the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission investigated claims of systematic discrimination against female directors.

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East Village Community Gardens to Host Screenings of National Security Docs

Does government surveillance really get your goat? (To be honest I have never really understood that expression but I am just going to run with it.) Is your ideal evening spent watching documentaries on the deep state? If so, then you’re in luck.

In a new film fest running today through Aug. 5 — ominously titled “Spy vs. Us” — the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space (MoRUS) in the East Village takes on national security and the surveillance state. Even better, like last year’s MoRUS-sponsored film and theater festivals, this year’s festival screenings will occur in the lovely environs of several community gardens. Tonight’s opening screening takes place in the roof garden of Alphabet City’s fabled Umbrella House.

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Coney Island Announces Lineup for Summer ‘Flicks on the Beach’

From last year’s Flicks on the Beach. Credit: Alliance for Coney Island.

With the memory of the recent Mermaid Parade still warm in our hearts, we’re pleased to note that the Coney Island Flicks on the Beach festival has announced this year’s lineup.

The film selection is an eclectic mix of the heavily family-friendly — Beauty and The Beast, Finding DoryThe Lego Batman Movie — and a few edgier selections like Get Out. The series is sponsored by Amazon Studios, who will also be doing previews of two Amazon Studios originals — Landline, the new dysfunctional family dramedy from the Obvious Child team, and Crown Heights, a Sundance drama (adapted from a This American Life episode) about a wrongfully imprisoned man.

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