Art Hearts

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Art This Week: Uncanny Glitches and Duchamp’s Commodification

Lina Puerta, Crop Laborer (pink and gold), 2018

Present Bodies: Papermaking at Dieu Donné
Opening Wednesday, December 4 at BRIC, 7 pm. On view through February 2.

Though it’s not quite as big a part of our lives as it used to be, paper is still ubiquitous. It creates our books, our restaurant menus, our never-ending piles of junk mail, and of course, our art. Starting Wednesday, our humble paper will get the star treatment at an exhibit at BRIC, showcasing artists who not only make art on paper but make the very paper displaying their art. The show features eight artists who participated in a recent residency at hand papermaking organization Dieu Donné. They all use their craft to explore marginalized bodies, taking both their identities and the medium their art exists on into their own hands.

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Art This Week: Avant-Garde Retrospective and Mall Memories

Phill Niblock
China 88 Slide 94
1988
Courtesy of Phill Niblock and Fridman Gallery.

Working Photos
Opening Monday, November 25 at Fridman Gallery, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through January 5.

Phill Niblock has been creating art for over fifty years, which is longer than the majority of people reading this have presumably been alive. This dedication to creation has manifested in the form of minimalist audio compositions, photographs, and film. He has collaborated with the likes of Sun Ra and shown work anywhere from the Tate Modern to DIY space Silent Barn. Now, he’ll be showing a wide variety of this multifaceted body of work at Fridman Gallery, in an exhibition that will be accompanied by a performance and screening series taking place both at the gallery and at Niblock’s longtime loft space on Centre Street.

(image via Front Room Gallery / Facebook)

Mallrat to Snapchat: the End of the Third Place
Opening Friday, November 29 at Front Room Gallery, 7 pm to 9 pm. On view through January 12.

One of the most popular places to shop during the holidays is a mall, or at least it used to be. Now, these hubs for teen socializing, family activities, and hurried gift-searching are becoming a thing of the past, replaced by online stores and shifting shopping tendencies. Photographer Phil Buehler seeks to illuminate this cultural shift in his solo exhibition Mallrat to Snapchat, using a New Jersey mall that closed earlier this year as his main case study. The show will appropriately open on Black Friday, and features photographs of the mall in various stages of existence as well as paraphernalia like vinyl albums from 1973, the year the mall opened.

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Art This Week: Anxiety-Inspired Mosaics, Nostalgic Beading, and More

Rashid Johnson
The Broken Five, 2019
Ceramic tile, mirror tile, spray enamel, bronze, oil stick, black soap, wax
246.4 x 398.1 x 7.6 cm / 97 x 156 3/4 x 3 in
left: H.98 W.74 D.3 in
right: H.98 W.86 D.3 in
Photo: Martin Parsekian
© Rashid Johnson
Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

The Hikers
Opening Tuesday, November 12 at Hauser & Wirth 22nd Street, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through January 25.

Mosaics have an interesting place in the realm of fine art. Similar to collage, they simultaneously occupy spots in both high and low art, and can occasionally be seen as part of home decor. As it turns out, Rashid Johnson works in both mosaic and collage, as well as sculpture, film, and other multimedia endeavors. His latest exhibition, The Hikers, is inspired by a film he shot in the Colorado mountains and uses all these artistic disciplines to explore the ever-growing anxiety that stems from the mere act of being alive in today’s tumultuous times, both in America and beyond. In addition to The Hikers, the gallery will also be opening a show of eclectic, colorful paintings by Mike Kelley.

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Art This Week: Riffs On History and Hyperreal Sculptures

Yvette Mayorga
Homeland Promised Land, 2019
Acrylic piping on canvas
24h x 24w in
60.96h x 60.96w cm

A Part of US
Opening Thursday, November 7 at Geary. On view through December 20.

The first thing an onlooker might notice about the works of Yvette Mayorga is the color, which draws you in with its fluorescent brightness and candied hues. Next, you might notice its unique style, consisting of acrylic piping on canvas instead of brushstrokes. Paired with the colors, the works almost resemble elaborate baked goods or confections—even her sculptures, made of glazed porcelain, could look good enough to eat. Mayorga isn’t just looking to please one’s sweet tooth; her work (on view starting Thursday at Soho gallery Geary) also provides commentary on the so-called American Dream, which isn’t quite so dreamy for everyone. 

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Art This Week: Human Bones and Tyree Guyton

Nicole Awai, Reflection Pool, 2019, acrylic paint, resin, graphite, nail polish, plastic, shells, crystalline solids and paper, 50 x 38 in. 

Envisioning the Liquid Land
Opening Wednesday, October 30 at Lesley Heller Gallery, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through December 21.

Envisioning the Liquid Land could be the title of a book on how climate change will undoubtedly plunge us all underwater one day, but it’s also the name of Nicole Awai’s latest solo show, on view starting Wednesday at Lesley Heller Gallery on Orchard Street. The Trinidad-born artist and teacher is known for utilizing a wide range of items in her art, from nail polish and resin to feathers and shells, in order to explore the intricacies of living in America today. Awai’s multifaceted style gives her work a multi-dimensional feel reminiscent of candy-colored dreamlands that look almost like normal life, but more surreal and more intriguing. That’s not all—in the gallery’s project space, there will also be an installation by Rachelle Dang, inspired by Hawaiian colonialism and botanical cabinets.

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Art This Week: Trippy Paintings and Dreamy Colors

(image via Sidel and McElwreath)

Harvest
Opening Wednesday, October 23 at 172 East 4th Street, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through November 20.

Frequently, galleries will show work by acclaimed artists who just happen to not be alive anymore. Sometimes their work gets combined with more contemporary creations, but not when art advisory group Sidel & McElwreath is concerned. Their focus is squarely on living artists, and they’ll be showcasing nine of their favorites at an East Village exhibition opening this Wednesday. The work included runs the gamut in both form and content, like a bountiful harvest should, and presents a chance for artists and viewers of art who may not normally gather in the same room to come together as a community.

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Art This Week: Cinema of Transgression and Outdoor Oddities

Image: Other Wise from “Mirror Mirror, Daylight Cinema” at The Old Shul for Social Sculpture, Tessa Hughes-Freeland.

Passed and Present
Opening Thursday, October 17 at Howl! Happening, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through November 17.

One of the pioneers of the Cinema of Transgression—an New York-based underground movement active in the 80’s that focused on low-budget subversion—was Tessa Hughes-Freeland, an experimental filmmaker who utilized psychedelic, kaleidoscopic visuals in her work, as well as found footage. This exhibition at East Village space Howl Happening acts as a “cinematic survey” of her work, featuring sculptures, videos, and an “interactive kaleidoscope.” Beyond the opening reception, there will be several special events throughout the course of the show, including film screenings and filmmaking workshops led by Hughes-Freeland herself.

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Art This Week: Pastels, Flowers, and Queer Abstraction

(image via Equity Gallery / Facebook)

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
Opening Wednesday, October 9 at Equity Gallery, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through November 2.

There are plenty of exhibitions nowadays that spotlight creations by queer artists of present and past, but this show at Equity Gallery organized by critics and curators Christopher Stout and Eric Sutphin narrows its focus even more to zero in on what they call “queer abstraction.” Deeming the exhibition a “visual essay,” it (and the six artists participating) aims to explore how the subgenre has been showcased both locally and abroad, and the power (or lack thereof) of abstract art that doesn’t have an overt political statement to it.

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Ridgewood Open Studios, Satellite Fair, and More Art This Week

(image via Satellite Art Show / Facebook, pictured artwork by Julia Sinelnikova)

Satellite Art Fair
Opening Thursday, October 3 at 630 Flushing Avenue, 5 pm to midnight. On view through October 6. Tickets $10 for one day, $15 for the week.

Art fairs have a bit of a reputation. Namely, they’re associated with the types of people with enough money to buy expensive art (and who can take a break from their jobs to browse for it). The Satellite Art Fair strives to break from this model, offering an experience that’s less about the money and more about the artists, with a focus on the independent and experimental. Also, it’s in one of the most unique structures currently housing art: the Pfizer Building on Flushing Avenue, a huge mazelike place that used to be a pill factory and that currently also provides space for anything from food businesses to music studios. From Thursday to Sunday, it’ll be filled with art and performance from Satellite’s roster of 40+ creators from around the country.

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Art This Week: Questioning Borders and a Brazzers Collaboration

(image via The Lower Eastside Girls Club)

Love No Border: An Artist’s Call for Action
Opening Monday, September 23 at the Lower Eastside Girls Club, 6 pm. On view through November 30.

It’s always been common for art to intersect with buzzy political topics, for better for for worse. Of course, not everyone is just trying to capitalize on the latest news item; some artists have more noble intentions. One show that fits more into this category is Love No Border, a group show at the Lower Eastside Girls Club featuring artists from New York, Guatemala, Mexico, and New Orleans who are “questioning the value of borders in 21st century society.” The show includes a wide variety of artistic disciplines—from a sculpture of stuffed toys referencing ICE to a contribution by performance art activist group Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir—and there will be events throughout the run of the show to raise funds for immigrant aid organizations. 

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