A Lot about a plot

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A Castle That Protected Soldiers Struggles to Do the Same For the Homeless

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Allen Ross lives in a castle, but it feels more like purgatory.

Ross is diabetic, arthritic and schizophrenic and had to turn to the Bedford Atlantic Armory Men’s Assessment Shelter when he could no longer pay his rent. He’s spending his day passing time in the shadows of the turrets that tower four stories into the air above Crown Heights. Like the rest of the residents of the 124-year-old edifice that has been a shelter since 1983, Ross is in the assessment phase of the New York City shelter system, meaning he is waiting to be placed in long-term housing. The typical stay at Bed-Atlantic lasts 21 days.

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America’s Oldest Surviving Mosque Is in Williamsburg

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

104 Powers Street. (Photo: Zuha Siddiqui)

There’s a building at 104 Powers Street in Williamsburg, an inconspicuous row house just around the corner from the rooftop bars, art galleries and coffee shops near the Lorimer L stop on Metropolitan Avenue. White clapboard slats, sloping roof. Look closer, and there’s a discreet, white turret topped with a crescent. If no one had pointed it out, you wouldn’t know you were walking past North America’s oldest surviving mosque. More →

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An East Williamsburg Church Has Been Home to Germans, Latinos, and Now Uncertainty

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Rev. Rafael Perez leads a prayer at the St. Nicholas Roman Catholic Church on Dec. 9, 2018.

On a recent Sunday, right after Spanish-language services, an eight-piece mariachi band streamed into the St. Nicholas Catholic Church in East Williamsburg. Guitars and trumpets blended together in a musical homage to the Virgin of Guadalupe, a venerated figure who symbolizes devotion throughout the Latino community. Just below in the main hall, a feast was on the tables and flowers, flags and banners surrounded the virgin’s likeness.

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A Chinatown Church Carries the Flame For a Forgotten Greek Community

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Greek Orthodox worshippers gathered on Dec. 3 to hear Archbishop Demetrios of America speak for the Feast Day of Saint Barbara at the eponymous St. Barbara Greek Orthodox church. The church was named for a martyr whose faith was seen to be unparalleled. Saint Barbara is said to have been tortured through the night for her Christian beliefs, and to honor this the visitors and parishioners at Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox church chanted in unison until the candles lit by the idols at the doors of the sanctuary had all burnt out and the sun cast its first wan fingers of light against the window panes.

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Mysterious Disappearances On the Corner of 7A

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

(Photo by Liz Clayman for NY Mag)

The building on the corner of East Seventh Street and Avenue A is painted vibrant yellow and blue. Inside of Miss Lily’s 7A, the theme continues with patterns and colors that reflect a diverse crowd that keeps the place buzzing past midnight on weekends.

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Before Club Cumming and the Nuyorican, the Beer Flowed at a Prohibition-Era Church

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Mural on the walls of Club Cumming.

There’s no sign announcing the name of the establishment on the ground floor of 505 East 6th Street. There are only two silver C’s on the receded wood and glass door, and a chandelier hanging from the ceiling in the foyer, where a small bulletin board announces the month’s events at Club Cumming.

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The Closing of Don Pedro Was the End of an Era (One of Many)

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

(Photo: Gavin Thomas for NY Mag)

When a New York Times reporter caught a horror-themed drag show at Don Pedro in 2014, he described it as an “off-the-wall experience”— which is how you could describe so many of the shows there. Riot Chica, for instance, was a “queer riot girl” show that featured the likes of Amor Prohibido, a cover band that puts a punk spin on the classics of late cumbia superstar Selena. 

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For 108 Years, This Bushwick Church Has Paid Witness to Tragedy and Transformation

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

St. Barbara’s Roman Catholic Church in central Bushwick is one of the only Spanish Mission style churches on the East Coast. (Wikimedia Commons/Jim Henderson)

Since 1909, the generations of working-class immigrants who have worshipped at St. Barbara’s Roman Catholic Church in Bushwick have known their share of hardship. Over the church’s 108-year history, congregants have grieved thousands of deaths, from members lost to the AIDS crisis in the 1980s and ‘90s to victims of the collapse of the World Trade Center twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001.

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The Story of Colonnade Row Before the Blue Men Grouped

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

The imposing façade of 434 Lafayette Street, one of the remaining buildings in the historic Colonnade Row, evokes an earlier, more prosperous time. Its Corinthian columns, tall and grandiose, are wrapped in a protective mesh to prevent disintegration. The marble, extracted in Westchester County and cut by convicts at the Sing Sing correctional facility, continues to decay under the sun.

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