A Lot about a plot

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A Chinatown Church Carries the Flame For a Forgotten Greek Community

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Greek Orthodox worshippers gathered on Dec. 3 to hear Archbishop Demetrios of America speak for the Feast Day of Saint Barbara at the eponymous St. Barbara Greek Orthodox church. The church was named for a martyr whose faith was seen to be unparalleled. Saint Barbara is said to have been tortured through the night for her Christian beliefs, and to honor this the visitors and parishioners at Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox church chanted in unison until the candles lit by the idols at the doors of the sanctuary had all burnt out and the sun cast its first wan fingers of light against the window panes.

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Mysterious Disappearances On the Corner of 7A

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

(Photo by Liz Clayman for NY Mag)

The building on the corner of East Seventh Street and Avenue A is painted vibrant yellow and blue. Inside of Miss Lily’s 7A, the theme continues with patterns and colors that reflect a diverse crowd that keeps the place buzzing past midnight on weekends.

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Before Club Cumming and the Nuyorican, the Beer Flowed at a Prohibition-Era Church

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

Mural on the walls of Club Cumming.

There’s no sign announcing the name of the establishment on the ground floor of 505 East 6th Street. There are only two silver C’s on the receded wood and glass door, and a chandelier hanging from the ceiling in the foyer, where a small bulletin board announces the month’s events at Club Cumming.

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The Closing of Don Pedro Was the End of an Era (One of Many)

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

(Photo: Gavin Thomas for NY Mag)

When a New York Times reporter caught a horror-themed drag show at Don Pedro in 2014, he described it as an “off-the-wall experience”— which is how you could describe so many of the shows there. Riot Chica, for instance, was a “queer riot girl” show that featured the likes of Amor Prohibido, a cover band that puts a punk spin on the classics of late cumbia superstar Selena. 

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For 108 Years, This Bushwick Church Has Paid Witness to Tragedy and Transformation

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

St. Barbara’s Roman Catholic Church in central Bushwick is one of the only Spanish Mission style churches on the East Coast. (Wikimedia Commons/Jim Henderson)

Since 1909, the generations of working-class immigrants who have worshipped at St. Barbara’s Roman Catholic Church in Bushwick have known their share of hardship. Over the church’s 108-year history, congregants have grieved thousands of deaths, from members lost to the AIDS crisis in the 1980s and ‘90s to victims of the collapse of the World Trade Center twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001.

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The Story of Colonnade Row Before the Blue Men Grouped

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

The imposing façade of 434 Lafayette Street, one of the remaining buildings in the historic Colonnade Row, evokes an earlier, more prosperous time. Its Corinthian columns, tall and grandiose, are wrapped in a protective mesh to prevent disintegration. The marble, extracted in Westchester County and cut by convicts at the Sing Sing correctional facility, continues to decay under the sun.

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From Grand Pianos to Sign Language, a History of Sound at 237 East 23rd Street

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

At the end of the 19th century, the piano factory of Helmuth Kranich and his partner Jacques Bach at 237 East 23rd Street was flourishing. The partners could hardly have known, as they imported exotic woods for the instruments they crafted and took out ads in the local papers, what challenges the coming decades would bring.

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As Farm and Factory, 670 Broadway Was a ‘Rendezvous for the Wealthy Set’

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

At the northeast corner of Broadway and Bond stands a most imperial structure. In 1874, when Brooks Brothers opened its newest location at this address, the New York Times declared 670 Broadway to be “an ornament to the street.” Four years later, the noted architect Rev. Dr. Samuel Osgood called it “the finest business edifice in New York.”

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Off of Tompkins Square Park, a Site of Women’s Tragedy and Agency

This week, we continue our series of deep dives into the histories of storied addresses.

315 East 10th Street. (New York Department of Taxes, Records for Block 404, Lot 48).

Elizabeth McCormick and Julia Gross likely never met. But, as students at the “well known” St. Brigid’s Academy at 315 East 10th Street, they both made the same walk between Avenues A and B to a rowhouse nestled in the center of the block. They would have looked up and seen the same quatrefoils leaflets visible today on the molding of the rusty-brown parapet and around the front door. Perhaps, like wistful students all across the city, the girls stared dreamily out of one of the nearly dozen windows overlooking Tompkins Square Park, half-listening to lessons on Dutch immigration to the city or how the land the school stood on was once a farm that Petrus Stuyvesant, the director-general of the Dutch West India Company, had owned.

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