Williamsburg

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Nick Zinner and James Murphy Remember When Being in a Band Was ‘Not a Very Good Idea’

L to R: Nick Zinner, James Murphy, Rob Sheffield, and Lizzy Goodman. (Photo courtesy of Strand Book Store)

Last night at Strand Book Store, Lizzy Goodman said she considered her new oral history, Meet Me in the Bathroom: Rebirth and Rock and Roll in New York City 2001-2011, a “dirty high school reunion.” Which was weird, because I don’t remember going to high school with Aziz Ansari and Seth Meyers, who were in the audience.

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Week in Film: Dinosaurus!, a Highly Accurate Prehistoric Epic, Stalker Returns

Combat Cops
Thursday May 11, 9:30 pm at Nitehawk: $12

Perhaps you’ve heard of The Deuce Jockeys, the resident VJs at Nitehawk whose film series has a very specific mission: “Excavating the facts and fantasies of cinema’s most notorious block; 42 Street between 7th and 8th Avenues.” If you’re wondering, that’s the Port Authority Bus Terminal, once the epicenter of violence in Fear City. Around 1970, the Times described the place as a sort of terrifying, tortuous God’s waiting room– another circle of Hades that Dante himself would have considered just a bit too far even for tax evaders. Its occupants went one of two ways: “Some are waiting for buses. Others are waiting for death.”

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Week in Film: ‘Supernatural Comedy,’ Women Rule the World, and More


The Lost City Of Z

Now through Thursday May 11 at Sunshine Cinema: $14

I haven’t seen The Lost City of Z just yet, but what I can tell you is that the film takes place in 1925, a tumultuous time in the Western world when it looked like the sun might very well start to set on the British Empire. In fact, imperial order was starting to collapse around the globe, and would eventually be replaced by a new bipolar world order– divvied up into two supposedly opposite political instincts, nationalism and socialism. (If that sounds like a super mysterious process, that’s because it is. There are tons of fascinating theories about how and why this happened, and about WTF nationalism even is, man– none of which I will go into here.) So even though a bunch of landowning white men still ruled the day at this point, they were probably feeling a little insecure about their privileged position, which they justified by an unshakeable belief in white supremacy and fashionable pseudoscientific ideas/total BS concepts of the time. I mean, now we know that terms like “imperial expansion” and “colonization” are just fancy ways to talk about pirate stuff (e.g., raping, pillaging). Oh, and racism too.

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Loosie’s Opens a Hammock-Happy Cafe, and They’re Giving Away Coffee All Summer

(Photo: Daniel Correa)

The team behind Loosie Rouge and Loosie’s Kitchen is opening a café inside of their Williamsburg mini compound, and they’re giving away free Toby’s Estate coffee all summer long. That’s right: Free. Coffee. From 7am to 8am, every day, starting with their opening on Friday.

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4/20 Show at Don Pedro Ends in a Blaze as Fire Sparks Up Next Door

The facade of Don Pedro underneath the smashed-out windows of the second floor. (Photo: Nick McManus)

The ceiling damage in Don Pedro’s back room. (Photo: Nick McManus)

A fire broke out next to Don Pedro last night, seriously harshing a 4/20 show scheduled at the Williamsburg venue.

The blaze started at the closed Lantingua’s Deli Market shortly after 6pm, as Don Pedro’s patrons were enjoying happy hour, and raged on the first and second floors of the building at 92 Manhattan Avenue for an hour and a half, according to the FDNY. Four firefighters were taken to the hospital with minor injuries.

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Sasha Velour on 4/20, The Postmen Move to Bushwick, and More Performance Picks

THURSDAY

(image via Sasha Velour / Facebook)

Sasha Velour’s Nightgowns
Thursday, April 20 at National Sawdust, 8:30 pm doors, 10 pm show: $18 advance, $22 doors

If you live in Brooklyn and are watching this season of RuPaul’s Drag Race, there’s probably a pretty good chance you’re only a degree or two of separation from some of the queens competing. One of these hometown heroes is Sasha Velour, who has continued to host the unique drag variety show Nightgowns on a regular basis. The show is typically at Bizarre Bushwick, but is making the move to dear old Williamsburg and its funky, classy music hall National Sawdust.

Given that they’re moving to a bigger, swankier space, the lineup is pretty big too. You can see shows after fabulous show from Francesca, Hystée Lauder, Kandy Muse, Olive d’Nightlife, Pearl Harbor, Severely Mame, Scarlet Envy, Untitled Queen, and Vigor Mortis. And hey, it’s 4/20, so there’ll probably be some sort of relevant performance themes going on. Keep Reading »

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Week in Film: Viagra for Nursery Rhymes, Poitras Does Assange, and More

(Flyer via Spectacle)

Unkissed Bride 
Saturday April 22, 10 pm at Spectacle: $5 

OK, before you LMFAO at the premise of this Jack Harris film, put yourself in the shoes of either Ted or Margi, the young couple who find out on their honeymoon (of course) that there’s a roadblock standing in the way of (early) marital bliss. Like, that blows. Especially for such a young couple, because for the most part isn’t it true that marriage–am I pronouncing that right? may-raj…? mar-ridge..?–these days either ends in de jure divorce (courthouses, lawyers, and custody battles, etc.) or de facto divorce (separate beds, six-month yoga retreats, and the like).

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Week in Film: Find Out If Ghost in the Shell Is a Shadow of Its Former Self, and More


Ghost in the Shell (1996)
Thursday April 13, Saturday April 15, and Sunday April 16 at The Metrograph: $15

No better time to see the original Ghost in the Shell, now that the anime classic has been remade and lost a good chunk of its futuristic/cyborg ambiguity in the process via the casting of a decidedly blonde, white bombshell in the lead. In the remake, Scarlett Johansson plays Major, i.e. an Anglicized version of the already Anglized Cyborg Major Kusanagi from the anime version.

The year is 2029, and this “perfect specimen of human-brained computer engineering” has been tasked with tracking down the elusive and amorphous villain known as The Puppet Master, whose precise plan for overthrowing the world– a Blade Runner-like super-city megalopolis where the human race has become so consumed by technology, that they are now inseparable and, at times, difficult to distinguish. The film deftly navigates the ethical and existential quandaries that are dramatically more real than they were in 1996 when the animated film was made.

Ghost in the Shell (2017)
Thursday April 13 through Thursday April 20 at Nitehawk: $12

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The Mystery of the Cubeheads Is Solved

(Photo: Anaka Kaundinya)

Remember those mysterious cubeheads at Astor Place? Well, now we know what they were up to. No, they weren’t trying out the hot new headware. Turns out they were shooting a short for a campaign by the Tribeca Film Festival called “See Yourself In Others.”

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Ferry Good News: Rockaway Service Launches May 1, East River Fare Drops

Sure, the first boat got stuck in the mud on its way up from the Gulf Coast, but it looks like the city’s new ferry service is really, actually happening. And, for once, sooner than expected: Mayor de Blasio announced today– via the delightful chiptune promo above– that the Rockaway route will launch May 1, meaning you’ll soon get to pay your respects to the washed-up whale that was buried on the beach this week. Or, less morbidly: tacos! Tacoway Beach reopens in less than 22 days, according to the countdown clock we’ve had our eye on all winter.

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Week in Film: Punky Frida Kahlo, Buñuel in France, and More

(Painting by Panteha Abareshi)

The Girl Who Loves Roses
Thursday March 30, 6 pm to 9 pm at Larrie, NY: free

Kelsey and Remy Bennett, granddaughters of Tony Bennett, are working artists, outspoken feminists, and curators of various exhibitions and art happenings. You might be saying to yourself, “Of course they are.” But that would be a jerk move, since the Bennett sisters take after their family patriarch, who is widely known as one of the nicest dudes in showbiz (the Daily Beast called him “one of the greatest living Americans” for his long history of service to just causes including “Nazi hunting” and participating in the 1965 Selma to Montgomery marches of the Civil Rights movement). Their approach to curating is ultra-inclusive and social justice-oriented, but it’s not motivated by self-congratulatory horn tootin’ and seems instead to come from an easy, natural inclination to do good work.

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Smorgasburg Moves Outdoors With Spaghetti Donuts, Churro Ice Cream Sandwiches and… Prison Food?

Ube Kitchen’s halo-halo. (Photos courtesy of Smorgasburg.)

Earlier this month we mentioned that Smorgasburg was set to return outdoors this very weekend, April 1 and 2, with Brooklyn Flea’s Saturday market leaving its longtime home in Fort Greene and taking up residence next to Saturday Smorg in Williamsburg’s East River Park. Team Smorg now tells us there’s another change afoot this season: Their vendors won’t be returning to the South Street Seaport this year, since they’ve been unceremoniously replaced by a permanent resident. Bummer for those who like to pick up a lobster roll on the way to the Rockaway ferry.

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