Williamsburg

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The Mystery of the Cubeheads Is Solved

(Photo: Anaka Kaundinya)

Remember those mysterious cubeheads at Astor Place? Well, now we know what they were up to. No, they weren’t trying out the hot new headware. Turns out they were shooting a short for a campaign by the Tribeca Film Festival called “See Yourself In Others.”

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Ferry Good News: Rockaway Service Launches May 1, East River Fare Drops

Sure, the first boat got stuck in the mud on its way up from the Gulf Coast, but it looks like the city’s new ferry service is really, actually happening. And, for once, sooner than expected: Mayor de Blasio announced today– via the delightful chiptune promo above– that the Rockaway route will launch May 1, meaning you’ll soon get to pay your respects to the washed-up whale that was buried on the beach this week. Or, less morbidly: tacos! Tacoway Beach reopens in less than 22 days, according to the countdown clock we’ve had our eye on all winter.

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Week in Film: Punky Frida Kahlo, Buñuel in France, and More

(Painting by Panteha Abareshi)

The Girl Who Loves Roses
Thursday March 30, 6 pm to 9 pm at Larrie, NY: free

Kelsey and Remy Bennett, granddaughters of Tony Bennett, are working artists, outspoken feminists, and curators of various exhibitions and art happenings. You might be saying to yourself, “Of course they are.” But that would be a jerk move, since the Bennett sisters take after their family patriarch, who is widely known as one of the nicest dudes in showbiz (the Daily Beast called him “one of the greatest living Americans” for his long history of service to just causes including “Nazi hunting” and participating in the 1965 Selma to Montgomery marches of the Civil Rights movement). Their approach to curating is ultra-inclusive and social justice-oriented, but it’s not motivated by self-congratulatory horn tootin’ and seems instead to come from an easy, natural inclination to do good work.

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Smorgasburg Moves Outdoors With Spaghetti Donuts, Churro Ice Cream Sandwiches and… Prison Food?

Ube Kitchen’s halo-halo. (Photos courtesy of Smorgasburg.)

Earlier this month we mentioned that Smorgasburg was set to return outdoors this very weekend, April 1 and 2, with Brooklyn Flea’s Saturday market leaving its longtime home in Fort Greene and taking up residence next to Saturday Smorg in Williamsburg’s East River Park. Team Smorg now tells us there’s another change afoot this season: Their vendors won’t be returning to the South Street Seaport this year, since they’ve been unceremoniously replaced by a permanent resident. Bummer for those who like to pick up a lobster roll on the way to the Rockaway ferry.

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Best Chairs in Comedy, Annoyance’s Last Night, and More Performance Picks

WEDNESDAY

(flyer via The Annoyance)

Holy Fuck Comedy Hour
Wednesday, March 29 at The Annoyance Theater, 10:30 pm: FREE

As we’ve told you previously and with heavy hearts, strange n’ mighty little basement comedy theater The Annoyance is closing at the end of the month. More specifically, it’s the theater’s last night of shows tonight. What better way to send it off than by attending one of the shows The Annoyance is most lauded for, the late-night extravaganza that is the Holy Fuck Comedy Hour. The show assembles a strong assortment of comedians from different pockets of the NYC scene and asks them to write characters, scenes, songs, and more in only one week and then perform their creations with no rehearsal. And if you’re looking for even more chuckles, there will be three different improv shows happening earlier in the evening.

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California Invasion, Pop. 1280’s First Gig of the Year, and More Good Shows

Fred Thomas (Image via PopGun)

Fred Thomas, Kyle Forester, What Next? 
Wednesday March 29, 8 pm at Union Pool: $12

Back in 2007 when Saturday Looks Good to Me had found its way into CMJ, the Detroit Metro Times wondered, “Will Success Spoil Fred Thomas?” The short answer has turned out to be, no, not really. The slightly longer one is that Fred Thomas is a nice guy. So nice is Fred Thomas, that even after finding some well-deserved recognition in a fast-shrinking corner of music that is still confoundingly known as “indie rock,” he still does normal cool-dude stuff. He recently even stooped to record the lowliest trash-life punk that Detroit has to offer: the K9 Sniffies, whose members I hesitate to even call “musicians” (but who I am obligated to admit are my friends, or whatever).

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Week in Film: a Very Lynchian Retrospective, Full-Frontal Greek Mythology, and More


Metamorphoses
Saturday March 25 (10 pm),  Sunday March 26 (7:30 pm), Tuesday March 28 (10 pm) Thursday March 30 (10 pm) at Spectacle: $5, advance tickets available 

You know what’s cool about ancient Greek mythology? It looks good on almost anyone. Even 21st-century French people, as you’ll see in Christophe Honoré’s new film Metamorphoses. It’s actually based on a really old poem–but you already knew that by the film’s title right? Metamorphoses (the original) dates to about 8 AD when this Roman dude named Ovid fused bits from more than 250 existing Greek mythos together to create a pretty wacky piece of non-linear literature that defies the standard didactic, A-to-B tellings that were popular back then. Thankfully, Ovid’s story is every bit as riveting as the OG mythos, which are always chock-full gore, guts, adultery, betrayal and, of course, horny gods mingling with orgy-prone mortals.

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Bigmun & Frost Shot a Smooth-Pop Video at Giglio Feast and It’s the Answer to Our Prayers

Old Dude Winter took the opportunity of his last week in charge to drop a final bowel movement on us: a big ol’ pile of snow to which the city adds its own secret ingredients –mostly street juice and dog refuse– resulting in the world’s grossest Slurpee flavor. But hope may have arrived just in time with a new music video from Bigmun & Frost. Shot in July of last year, it’s a reminder of what summertime is all about in Brooklyn– and for John Bigmun it’s not just backyard kiddie pools filled with beer, it’s also the Giglio Feast that goes down every year in Williamsburg at Lady of Mount Carmel. “It’s like the most amazing thing in the world,” he said. “It’s old Brooklyn, it’s the old country.”

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Week in Film: Cinema Kink a-Go-Go, a Chloë Sevigny Retrospective, and More


Cinekink NYC
Thursday March 16 through Sunday March 19 at Anthology Film Archives: $11 individual screenings, $45 to $85 for all-access pass (get your tickets here

Fet culture and cinema? I mean, duh, guys, they’re a match made in heaven– er, whichever circle of hell doms and bronies go to. (Dunno about you guys, but that’s where I’m hoping to end up, Lucifer willing). That’s why Cinekink NYC– which clears up any confusion by calling itself “the kinky film festival”– is popping off this week for its 14th year.

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Something ‘Terrifying’ and Four More Performance Picks

WEDNESDAY

(image via Maude Gun / Facebook)

Maude Night #4
Wednesday, March 15 at Muchmore’s, 9 pm: $5-7 suggested donation

This is decidedly not the UCB showcase, but a queer/femme/POC space for variety performance and expression helmed by witchy, culty performance-art band Maude Gun. The lineup includes “Mountain Moving Witch of the West Coast” Carissa Matsushima, “Ritualistic Serotonin Poem Witch” Tara Jayakar, “Nose Bleeding Drama Queen Healer” Holly Simple, and a closing piece by Maude Gun themselves. Though it is the name of their band, they seem to be rather generous with the term “maude,” referring to their booked performers and potentially everyone in the room by the moniker. In the event description is a reminder: “let’s mind our pronouns! (call everyone a MAUDE if you’re lost)” Keep Reading »

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Brooklyn Flea Is Moving Its Saturday Market From Fort Greene to Williamsburg

(Photo courtesy of Brooklyn Flea)

With spring fast approaching, we suspected today’s news about Bushwick Flea and the new Starr Space Flea Market wouldn’t be the only stirrings in the world of hipster flea markets. The original, Brooklyn Flea, has just announced that it’s folding up its Fort Greene market– yes, the one that started it all– and moving it to Williamsburg. The Saturday Flea, which has been in Fort Greene for nine years, will now take place alongside Saturday Smorgasburg in East River State Park.

The Flea’s founders explained the move in an email:

It’s a bittersweet moment for us, as our flagship location in Fort Greene is where this whole trip began. With a brand-new running track laid at the [Bishop Laughlin Memorial High] school over the winter and the chance to expand beckoning at East River State Park, however, it made sense to make this move now. The Flea loved every moment of its nine years at Bishop Loughlin, and we thank everyone at the school for their partnership over the last decade.

The Flea’s Sunday markets are staying put this season: Sunday Smorgasburg will remain at Prospect Park’s Breeze Hill, where it has been since 2015, and the Sunday Flea will remain at DUMBO’s Archway under the Manhattan Bridge. You’ll recall that the Sunday Flea took place in Williamsburg until last season, so the Saturday Flea’s move to the neighborhood is a homecoming of sorts.

It’s all one big game of musical chairs. Speaking of chairs, maybe you can score a nice little Eames number during the Flea’s opening weekend, April 1 and 2.

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Williamsburg’s Dokonoko Launches Debut Women’s Line at Soho Pop-Up

(Photo courtesy of Dokonoko)

Dokonoko, a new Williamsburg-based womenswear brand, launched its debut line last night in Manhattan. For the next three months, you can peruse the label’s colorful, funky pieces at the new Soho location of Bulletin, the local-designer showcase that also has a store in Williamsburg.

Dokonoko was launched by Tokyo-born graphic designer Reina Sugiyama and her fellow New Yorker Lacey Voss, who has designed for American Outfitters and Victoria’s Secret. The brand describes itself as “a play on many things: Japanese and American cultures, femininity and feminism, identity and stereotypes, and the seriousness of the retail world.” The quintessential “Dokonoko woman,” according to the brand’s manifesto, had an international upbringing (Sugiyama was a globe-trotting diplomat’s daughter) and “found her freedom to be truly herself” in New York City.

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