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In a Post-Trump World, The Special‘s Brett Davis is Still a Character

(photo: John Ambrosio)

(photo: John Ambrosio)

The idea of regularly tuning into a late-night public access show could cause some to raise their eyebrows, but rest assured MNN’s weekly comedy/variety show The Special Without Brett Davis, which replaced The Chris Gethard Show upon its move to the Fusion network, is nothing boring. Unless it’s trying to be.

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TV Party, Alright! Newness From Public Access TV, Television, Psychic TV, and TV On the Radio

People say we’re living in a golden era of television and that’s apparently true: not only is Television playing a rare (free!) gig at the House of Vans in October (if you failed to RSVP, they’re also doing a Boston date), but the band’s ex-guitarist, Richard Lloyd, is playing Bowery Electric later in the month.

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Jonathan C. Stewart Dives into a Williamsburg Story On AMC’s Making of the Mob

Jonathan C. Stewart, actor who plays Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel in the new AMC series,The Making of the Mob (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Jonathan C. Stewart, actor who plays Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel in the new AMC series,The Making of the Mob (Photo: Nicole Disser)

We couldn’t have picked a better spot to meet Jonathan C. Stewart, the actor who plays notorious mobster Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel on AMC’s new show, The Making of the Mob. The Williamsburg dive bar, Jr. & Son is located in the neighborhood where Bugsy was born and raised, but in a way it’s hard not to find in the place a spiritual home for Brooklyn mobster lore as well. A grumpy looking bartender sporting a gold chain, thin mustache, and what was left of his hair slicked back grumbled to his regulars in a naturally aggressive Brooklyn wise-guy intonation. “Huh, lifestyles of the rich and famous, eh?” he said gesturing with disdain towards the TV in the corner. The sun was still shining outside, but inside it felt like a rainy day.

Stewart is a genial Midwestern dude with an easy smile. Even with the help of a fedora, I had to squint hard to imagine him harnessing the violent energy to play a personality like Bugsy Siegel, a hot-headed mobster who had about as much blood on his hands as he had style. Keep Reading »

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As Community Boards Get Skewered On Film, Reform Is On the Agenda

(Ray loses it on Girls.)

(Ray loses it on Girls.)

Could the stereotypically grumpy face of Community Boards be changing? Sixteen-year-old Leila Eliot recently joined Manhattan Community Board 3, and last night at a meeting of the same board it was announced that 30 other Manhattan teens have applied for seats on their respective CBs, thanks to recent legislation that allows citizens 16 and up to run. Then last Sunday, on the Millennial-centric Girls, of all places, 34-year-old Ray (the old man of the Girls universe) showed up at a Brooklyn Community Board meeting with a handmade model of a traffic intersection in his hands and hopes of a quieter neighborhood in his heart.
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Mysteries: Mike Tyson Statue at NYU, Turkey’s Nest in Hell’s Kitchen

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

(Photo: Daniel Maurer)

The Fillmore East’s new plaque wasn’t the only historical marker unveiled in recent days — last week, while we were trying to score tickets for Television and Joshua Light Show (some footage of the show here), we noticed this stately statue of Mike Tyson outside of Skirball Center, across from Washington Square Park. After we did a double take like Little Mac getting clocked in the jaw by Iron Mike, it was obvious this was just a promotion for his new Adult Swim show, Mike Tyson Mysteries, which — as Tyson himself has noted — is a trippy version of Scooby-Doo meets A-Team. When we walked by yesterday, the statue had vanished.
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NBC Wants to Come Over to Your Place and Shoot a Couple of Shows

The Slap location-seeking flyer, spotted on Grand Street, Williamsburg (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

The Slap location-seeking flyer, spotted on Grand Street, Williamsburg (Photo: Daniel Maurer)

Gird your lofts. North Brooklyn is set to be enshrined (yet again) in the ageless portals of our most glorious medium—I’m talking of course of television—in a pair of NBC/Universal productions currently in pre-production. And the studio wants YOU to help make it happen.

Location scouts for both The Slap (a miniseries based on Christos Tsiolkas’ celebrated novel of the same name) and Mr Robot (a pilot about a young, socially awkward programmer who decides he can only connect to people by hacking them) have been loitering and flyer-posting in the Williamsburg/Bushwick vicinity.
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Hear Yr Fave Television and Pixies Albums On Some Really Expensive Speakers

pixiesThis has to be the next best thing to seeing the Shitty Pixies live: next month, you’ll be able to listen to the real Pixies on Output’s bone-rattling sound system. Classic Album Sundays, an international series of listening parties for classic albums, is back at Output’s Panther Room. Next up, on March 23: a session for Television’s brilliant Marquee Moon, moderated by Bryan Waterman, who authored the 33 1/3 book about the album (he’s also interviewing onetime Television member Richard Hell at The Strand next week).
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Richard Hell Will Chat With Robert Christgau Tomorrow Night

CleanTramp-pb-c-copyIf you missed your chance to dine with Richard Hell, you’ll have a chance to see him for free tomorrow night when the punk-rock royal signs copies of his autobiography I Dreamed I Was a Very Clean Tramp (just released in paperback) at powerHouse Arena in Dumbo. The East Villager’s former band, Television, played its first show at CBGB 40 years ago this month.

That momentous performance may well be talked about during his interview Tuesday with Robert Christgau, who spent more than three decades as The Village Voice‘s chief music critic. Following the discussion, Hell will answer a few questions from the audience before signing books, according to powerHouse Arena’s events coordinator, Justin Levine.

Seating for the event, which goes from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., is available on a first-come, first-serve basis; reservations are encouraged via RSVP@powerHouseArena.com.

If you’d rather see him in Manhattan, he’ll be at The Strand on March 20, in conversation with Bryan Waterman, who penned the 33 1/3 about Television’s Marquee Moon album.

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‘We’d Found This Cave Out of Time’: A Look Back at Glam Rock’s Club 82

(Photos: Aileen Polk)

(Photos: Eileen Polk)

When Judy Garland, Kirk Douglas, Liz Taylor and the glitterati of the ‘50s wanted to walk on the wild side, they headed to the East Village’s Club 82, “New York’s After-Dark Rendezvous.” The notoriety of the basement club, at 82 East Fourth Street, came from its elaborate stage shows performed by 35 female impersonators. Strippers, dancers, comedians and singers, all men in drag, staged three shows nightly, seven days a week well into the ‘60s, when the novelty wore off and the club’s popularity faded.
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Watch the House Videographers at CBGB Call Richard Hell a Crybaby

As you may have read over at Rolling Stone, Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong — in what’s sure to be one of the highlights of the CBGB Festival — are screening some of their rare late-70s and early-80s concert footage at Bowery Electric tonight, between performances by Cheetah Chrome of the Dead Boys, Syl Sylvain of the New York Dolls, and Glen Matlock of the Sex Pistols. We were lucky enough to have the authors of our weekly Nightclubbing column into the B+B Newsroom last Friday, along with Richard Boch, who’s working on a memoir of his time manning the door of the Mudd Club, and Pat Irwin, the guitarist for the Raybeats, 8 Eyed Spy and the B-52s, who spoke about his recently unearthed collaboration with Philip Glass.

If you missed Friday’s discussion, watch the replay above. Here’s what the gang had to say about Suicide (we spoke to Martin Rev of that band back in June) and the evolution of the Ramones.
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