soho

No Comments

Turn to the Left, Right: David Bowie Is Everywhere Right Now

Suit used for the Ziggy Stardust tour. Courtesy of the David Bowie Archive (c) Victoria and Albert Museum.

David Bowie made no secret of his love for New York; he was known for frequenting the Strand and sneaking into movies at the Angelika, spending his final years enjoying all that the city has to offer. Several upcoming events around town will pay tribute to the late, great Starman, who died after a battle with cancer in January 2016. Whether it’s through a gallery exhibition of behind-the-scenes photos from Bowie’s prime, or a themed dance party in Brooklyn, there’s no shortage of ways to show your love and appreciation for Bowie this month. Hang on to yourself.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Art This Week: Chapels, Cryptids, Self-Portraits

(image courtesy of Cooler Gallery)

Chiaozza Chapel
Opening Tuesday, February 13 at Cooler Gallery, 7 pm to 10 pm.

Everyone’s favorite Navy Yard industrial icebox turned gallery is at it once again with a new exhibition by artistic duo Chiaozza. While their show’s name, Chiaozza Chapel, may sound like an old piece of ornate architecture you’d learn about in art history class, their work is certainly very modern. However, it’s still an actual chapel, at least in the formal sense of the word. The duo has transformed a small 6’x7’ section of the space into a colorful, geometrical space for contemplation and gathering. If you’re old-school, think of the structure within as a kind of modernized, minimalist stained glass. Personally, I think it kind of looks like a nice, stylish condo for birds. Keep Reading »

No Comments

Streetball Letterman Jackets, Art & AIDS, and More Exhibitions This Week

(image via Fort Gansevoort)

I’ve Been Heard
Opening Thursday, November 30 at Fort Gansevoort, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through

“Public Parks to this day exist as one of the very few remaining spaces that are designed to be democratic: free and open to all,” proclaims a statement for artist and boxing teacher Cheryl Pope’s latest installation at Fort Gansevoort. While the intent for a location isn’t always put into practice by all, it does remain true that public parks provide, or attempt to provide, such a freedom. Pope’s installation focuses on NYC youth, who often flock to parks and the street basketball courts that accompany them. After speaking with an array of young people, she created banner flags and “All-American Varsity Letterman Jackets” displaying some of their statements, elevating the words of youths who may be often ignored into literal fine art. Keep Reading »

No Comments

Art This Week: Continued Haunts, Queer Ceramics, and Planning Ahead For Death

(image via Leslie-Lohman Museum / Facebook)

Objectified
Opening Friday, November 3 at Leslie+Lohman Prince Street Project, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through November 5.

This swift three-day exhibition shows the work of queer ceramic artist Caitlin Rose Sweet. I first encountered Sweet’s work when I interviewed her about a show she was doing inspired by Bosch’s notorious triptych The Garden of Earthly Delights. Since then, she hasn’t stopped whipping up sculptural pieces that impressively mix elements of grotesque and feminine. Friday, her solo show Objectified is unveiled to the public, placing the queer femme body in all its manifestations on view. Sweet’s ceramic sculpture creations can resemble traditional craft art, domestic home goods, genitalia, gnarled fingers, and fantastical beasts all at once. Will you be entranced or spooked? Keep Reading »

No Comments

Performance Picks: Stonewall Recollections, Radical Burlesque, Renewable Energy

WEDNESDAY

(image courtesy of Alton PR)

Street Theater
September 20-October 4 at The Eagle Bar, 7 pm: $25

The “father of modern queer theater” is back, and fittingly doing a show inside a gay leather bar in Manhattan. Yes, the late playwright and Stonewall Uprising participant Doric Wilson, who recently received a lifetime achievement award for his contributions to gay theater, is bringing his satirical Stonewall play Street Theater to Chelsea’s The Eagle.

Street Theater, which won an Innovative Theater award for a recent prior revival, was written in part to chronicle the events and people Wilson experienced personally at Stonewall in 1969. It’s produced by The Other Side of Silence (TSOS), one of the city’s first LGBT-centric theater companies, initially co-founded by Wilson and “resurrected” in 2002 by Wilson, Street Theater‘s director Mark Finley, and Barry Childs. Plus, after the show tonight, it’s “jockstrap night” at the bar. Keep Reading »

No Comments

Artists and Designers Try to Create the Next Iconic NYC Souvenir

A little Lady Liberty defends her iconic status. (photo: Diego Lynch)

What do tourists have to show for their trips to New York City?

Selfies and souvenirs, usually.

The moment visitors step off the plane, they’re greeted by ranks of Statue of Liberty miniatures, skyline snow globes, and Yankees paraphernalia. However, does everyone Heart NY?

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Art This Week: Bushwick Open Studios and Black Femmes

(photo: Sophia Wilson, via Facebook)

The Future Is (Black) Femme
Opening Friday, September 22 at 329 Broome Street, 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm. On view through October 3.

While the rest of our art opening recs for this week correspond with the return of Bushwick Open Studios, this show is happening in Manhattan. Lower Manhattan, so you Brooklyn dwellers don’t have to travel very far, don’t worry. The Future Is (Black) Femme is, unsurprisingly, an art exhibition of work by black femme artists. For the uninformed, “femme” is a term that describes a feminine-presenting person that may but doesn’t necessarily have to conform to the binary identity of “woman.” It can also mean a feminine-presenting lesbian, used as the opposite of “butch.”

Enough about semantics, on to the art. The exhibition is curated by Jessica Pettway, Josette Roberts, and Miranda Barnes, and features the work of 14 artists, including Roberts and Barnes. Though every artist identifies as a black femme and an artist, the show’s content spans a wide variety of artistic disciplines and themes, as every artist has something unique to say about existing in this country as a black femme. These lived experiences can often be painful, but the exhibition’s description notes that “similar themes of kinship, tenderness and rejoicing” are present throughout all the works. Keep Reading »

No Comments

The Museum of Interesting Things Is a Roving ‘Speakeasy’ Run By a Quirky Curator

How did we watch films at home before Netflix and DVD? And before VHS? Denny Daniel will show you at his Museum of Interesting Things. This “speakeasy museum” pops up weekly at various locations in the city to show how our current-day technology is based on earlier inventions, often going all the way back to the late 19th century. From 1960s solar-powered walkie-talkies to carousel animations and parts of the original World War II Enigma machine, Daniel has collected a wide array of antiques and curiosa.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Bowery Wall Tagged After Getting Mural By Controversial Pick, David Choe

(Photo courtesy of Shannon Barbour)

Taggers wasted no time marking up the Bowery wall’s newest mural.

The wall, on Houston Street and Bowery, has featured work by artists like Keith Haring and Kenny Scharf in the past and is now host to David Choe’s mural, completed last week.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Artists & Fleas Brings Williamsburg to Soho With a New Market

After a decade and a half as a staple of the Williamsburg flea market scene, Artists & Fleas is opening its fourth location, smack dab in the middle of Soho, on the corner of Prince and Broadway. Look out, Prada.

Founded by Brooklyn-based Amy Abrams and Ronen Glimer in 2003, A&F allows independent artists and designers to sell their wares (or wears. . .get it?), resulting in a hodge podge of hip stuff: vintage clothing, jewelry, leather products, art items, handbags, food, and, of course, beard oil. 

Keep Reading »

No Comments

This Museum Has ‘Expanded Visions’ For Queering and Preserving Art

Installation view, Expanded Visions: Fifty Years of Collecting, at Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, 2017. (photo: Riya Lerner)

Despite the suffocating amount of luxury stores, there are still some small pockets of Soho that retain the neighborhood’s old gritty art spirit. As you pass The Performing Garage, where experimental troupe The Wooster Group and others still rehearse and perform, you’ll now encounter an new and improved iteration of the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art. After lengthy renovations, the museum has reopened and nearly doubled in size with Expanded Visions: Fifty Years of Collecting, an exhibition rich in the history and scope of queerness and the artistic expression surrounding it.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Williamsburg’s Dokonoko Launches Debut Women’s Line at Soho Pop-Up

(Photo courtesy of Dokonoko)

Dokonoko, a new Williamsburg-based womenswear brand, launched its debut line last night in Manhattan. For the next three months, you can peruse the label’s colorful, funky pieces at the new Soho location of Bulletin, the local-designer showcase that also has a store in Williamsburg.

Dokonoko was launched by Tokyo-born graphic designer Reina Sugiyama and her fellow New Yorker Lacey Voss, who has designed for American Outfitters and Victoria’s Secret. The brand describes itself as “a play on many things: Japanese and American cultures, femininity and feminism, identity and stereotypes, and the seriousness of the retail world.” The quintessential “Dokonoko woman,” according to the brand’s manifesto, had an international upbringing (Sugiyama was a globe-trotting diplomat’s daughter) and “found her freedom to be truly herself” in New York City.

Keep Reading »