photography

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Sick of Pistorius? Take Another Look at South Africa

NOT × Chris Saunders on display now at Wallplay Gallery (Photo: Kirsten O'Regan)

NOT × Chris Saunders on display now at Wallplay Gallery (Photo: Kirsten O’Regan)

Lest Fashion Week leave you feeling jaded (about the superficiality of the industry, and the inanity of the clothing and the persons therein), allow me to offer an antidote of sorts: NOT × Chris Saunders, an exhibition currently showing at Wallplay that fuses fashion, photography, sculpture and video to explore the complex cultural underpinnings of style—South African style, in particular. Keep Reading »

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Get Some Fine Art With Your Morning Egg-and-Cheese

A Number of Names art gallery on Avenue C and East 7th (Photo: Kirsten O'Regan)

A Number of Names art gallery on Avenue C and East 7th (Photo: Kirsten O’Regan)

If a defunct bodega seems an unusual space for a curated art show, how about the wall outside a still-functioning deli? ANON (A Number of Names), the newest unorthodox art venue to materialize on Avenue C, shuns interiors entirely in favor of a door-sized vertical in the heart of Alphabet City.
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The Public Library with Robert Dawson + Diane Caldwell

Since 1994, California-based photographer Robert Dawson has been travelling across the country, capturing images of public libraries—those hallowed, endangered urban oases of learning and contemplation. The result of his eighteen-year pilgrimage have now been collected into a handsome tome, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay, which is simultaneously a visual record of America’s libraries, an examination of the manifold functions such institutions perform, and an impassioned lamentation over their steady decline from public consciousness. In the book’s foreword, veteran journalist Bill Moyers writes, “when a library is open, no matter its size or shape, democracy is open, too.” Dawson, in effect, presents a poignant argument for what’s at stake. He’ll be in conversation with Diane Cardwell, business reporter for The New YorkTimes.

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Meryl Meisler and A Tale of Two Cities: Disco Era Bushwick!

Meryl Meisler worked as a school teacher in cracked-out, riot-prone 80s Bushwick—but she also carried a medium format camera everywhere she went, snapping epic photos of the ‘hood. Now, she’s collected those pictures, and placed them alongside her photographs of disco-fevered Manhattan in the same era. Together, the two sets of images offer a riotous portrait of two different universes in one city—at once hopelessly divided, and disconcertingly similar. Join Meisler for a special presentation of her work. She’ll also be signing copies.

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This Photographer Ventures Into Strangers’ Bedrooms

Emma

Emma Anderson

The first people who responded to Emma Anderson’s classified ad seeking strangers to photograph — a couple in their late 40s who lived in public housing in New Zealand — told her they had been photographed before, and would she like to see the shots? Emma obliged, and was shocked to see the photos were of the two in explicit pornographic scenes. It didn’t help matters, she says, that “he looked exactly like the Penguin from Batman, like Danny DeVito.” But such is the nature of Emma’s work. “Good on them, man.”
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Bushwick History Photo Walk with Meryl Meisler

We all know Bushwick has changed, but none of us more so than Meryl Meisler. The photographer, who worked as an art teacher in Bushwick from the early ’80s, recalls that at the time the neighborhood “looked like the photographs that I had seen of Beirut.”  She set about capturing the life among the ruins. Now, perfectly safely, you can join the photographer for a tour of her current exhibition of “Disco Era Bushwick” photographs, and a walking tour of the neighborhood. Bring a camera.

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The Syrian Refugee Crisis

Photojournalist Diego Cupolo has documented sinister environments and the tough lives lived in them from Bushwick to Montevideo. Tonight at WORD, he discusses his recently released book, Seven Syrians: War Accounts From Syrian Refugees. Cupolo painstakingly records the lives of survivors of the current conflict, combining text and photos into a series of compelling portraits. He’ll be in discussion with Brooklyn-based writer/essayist Rahawa Haile.

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Hear Jack Ridley of Drowners Play While Your Mind Is Flooded With Photos of NYC

(Photo: Pete Voelker)

(Photo: Pete Voelker)

When photographer Pete Voelker first arrived in New York, he found the city overwhelming—and immediately began to document the constant movement and shifting surfaces of the urban streets. Now, six years in, he wants others to be similarly overwhelmed during his one night-only exhibition (and first ever solo show) Might As Well Enjoy It, which collates over 600 photographs in a projection video just under 5 minutes long. That’s 120 photographs a minute, or 2 every second.
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A Documentary Turns the Camera On Nan Goldin

Nan Goldin shot to fame with her visceral, heart-wrenching photographs of the drug-addled, sex-strewn lives of her East Village “tribe” in the late ’70s and early ’80s. Despite her Bostonian roots, everything about the photographer—her art, her voice, her hair, her trademark chain-smoking neuroticism—screams New York.
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Peep These Old-School Photographs of New-School Skateboarders

Lance Mountain in his bowl in California. (Photo: Matt Alberts)

Lance Mountain in his bowl in California. (Photo: Matt Alberts)

Last November, photographer Matt Alberts loaded up his Airstream with three of his pals, a stock of chemicals, and a large format camera. The foursome took off south and hit Route 66, riding it all the way to California to document the “people who have dedicated their lives to skateboarding.”
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In the East Village, an Upper West Sider’s Vision of ‘Williamsburg: Old and New’

Old and New, 2013. Paul Kessel. Photo: Courtesy of Umbrella Arts

Old and New, 2013, Paul Kessel. Photo: Courtesy of Umbrella Arts

It isn’t often that one decides to change career paths at the age of 69, but that’s precisely what Paul Kessel did. In his previous life, Kessel was a psychologist and psychoanalyst but these days he roams the streets armed with his camera, capturing street scenes that catch his eye.
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Alex Prager Used 20 Tons of Sand (and Her Sister) to Stage This Beach Scene

ALEX PRAGER Crowd #3 (Pelican Beach), 2013 archival pigment print 59.5 x 92 inches, 151.1 x 233.7 cm 60.5 x 93.56 x 2.25 inches (framed), 153.7 x 237.6 x 5.7 cm Edition of 6 Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong

ALEX PRAGER Crowd #3 (Pelican Beach), 2013 archival pigment print 59.5 x 92 inches, 151.1 x 233.7 cm 60.5 x 93.56 x 2.25 inches (framed), 153.7 x 237.6 x 5.7 cm Edition of 6 Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong

Alex Prager is not especially intimidating. The Los Angeles-based photographer is often smiling, rather petite and generally endearing. So it’s amusing to envision her atop a cherry picker, directing hundreds of actors like some sort of omniscient being, which is precisely what she did for her latest body of work, Face in the Crowd. Shot over four days on a sound stage in LA, the project features a slew of universally relatable locations (bleachers at a sports game, the beach, an airport, a generic looking rec room) populated with Prager’s friends, family and countless extras styled in flamboyant wigs and exaggerated makeup.
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