Parquet Courts

No Comments

Justin Frye of PC Worship Used a ‘Shitar’ On the New EP, Basement Hysteria

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

Despite the relentless output of records, save for some piecemeal rumors, there’s not a ton to go on when it comes to PC Worship, a Bushwick-based band that spans several rotating members (but is always led by Justin Frye) as well as influences of punk, drone, even free jazz. They’re known for wild improvisation but also their success in collaborations with Parquet Courts (a popular band that is in many ways their opposite). But most critics and music bloggers have agreed: PC Worship is nothing if not inexplicable. And their new EP, Basement Hysteria, set to drop November 13 when they return from a month-long European tour, sees the band containing the tradition of drone-clouded noise worship.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

Spawn of Parquet Courts & PC Worship Made A Book, Want You To Party With Them

10325162_10100160369565247_4479896978139500814_n

(Flyer by Andrew Savage)

Local garage punks Parquet Courts, AKA Parkay Quarts, did a really confusing thing recently and teamed up with another  band of similar musical tastes, PC Worship. Together these Brooklyn bands gave birth to PCPC, a bb that could play sick shows right out of the womb. But apparently music isn’t something the only thing these guys are keen to collaborate on. Tonight at Trans Pecos, AdHoc is throwing a party for the release of 2014, a book by A. Savage and Justin Frye.

Keep Reading »

No Comments

New York x Austin: Rounding Up the Brooklyn Bands at SXSW

Habibi at SXSW. (Photos by Ankita Mishra)

Habibi at Longbranch Inn (Photos: Ankita Mishra)

SXSW certainly isn’t for everyone– the crowds, the queues, the lack of available cabs, sure to leave any New Yorker squirming– but really, there’s no better place for discovering a whole lot of great music in not a whole lot of time. While the warm(ish) Texas weather was definitely a major selling point, the ultimate goal for yours truly (plus one talented photographer pal), was to catch as many bands as humanly possible. Despite the dark cloud of an early, unexpected tragedy (luckily, we were both fast asleep at the time of the accident), the festival re-gained its momentum. Over the course of four booze-and-BBQ fueled days, we criss-crossed Austin in search of some familiar faces. Here’s what we found.
Keep Reading »