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Gratis Grub Alert: Free Dogs at Feltman’s, 99-Cent Burgers at Duncan’s

A happy Feltman’s customer. (Photo courtesy of Michael Quinn.)

If you were planning to mooch off of your friends this weekend by not bringing any beer to their Memorial Day barbecues, here’s a far more respectable way to freeload.

Feltman’s, the 100-year-old hot dog brand that preceded Nathan’s and this summer returned to Coney Island six decades after it closed there, is celebrating its return with a giveaway. On Monday, starting at 11:30am, the first 150 people to line up for the boardwalk shack’s grand opening and ribbon cutting will score free all-natural beef dogs, served on a toasted potato bun. Remember: This dog won the approval of competitive-eating champ Takeru Kobayashi himself, who knows a thing or two about scoring free dogs. Then again, that’s probably not saying much, since he’s presumably pretty burned out on Nathan’s after eating fistfuls of them at a time.

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Helvetica, Yeah! Greenpoint Gets a Graphic Design Bookstore

(Photo courtesy of Hamish Smyth, Order)

If you’re the kind of person who delights in debating the relative merits of font serifs or reminiscing about the heyday of subway sign design then you may have a new place to congregate with the like-minded. The founders of Greenpoint-based design firm Order recently opened Standards Manual– to their knowledge New York’s only specialty graphic design bookstore.

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Attention Indie Film Fans: One Week to the Art of Brooklyn Film Festival

The Art of Brooklyn Film Festival

Picture courtesy of AoBFF17.

Here’s some good news for New York’s numerous indie film fans – the Art of Brooklyn Film Festival is only a week away.

Running June 3 to 12, the festival (acronym, for extra credit: AoBFF17) describes itself as “the ONLY international, independent festival in the world devoted to Brooklyn’s vibrant film and media scene,” and considers films with any connection to the borough.

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Good Room Launches Rooftop Party Series at Dobbin St, With Roberta’s Doing Food

(Courtesy of Dobbin St)

Output has one undeniable advantage over its Greenpoint clubbing counterpart, Good Room. It has a roof, which this year has been redesigned to resemble an “enchanted forest.” But, wait: Not to be outdone, Good Room has announced a series of parties over at Dobbin St, the neighboring events space that has been hosting man markets, movie screenings and the like.

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A Look at Industry City’s New Tugboat Bar, Ping-Pong Arena, and Mini Golf Course

(Photos courtesy of Industry City)

Last week we shared some details of the summer offerings at Sunset Park’s Industry City – including mini-golf, ping-pong, and a satellite eatery of the Frying Pan, the wildly popular floating restaurant at Pier 66 Maritime in Chelsea.

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50 Years Ago: The Summer of Love Brings Pot, Protests and Psychedelic Rock to the East Village

Tompkins Square Park
(Photo: James Jowers)

“As the hour grew late and working people around Tompkins Square Park began turning out the lights on Memorial Day 1967, police asked several hundred music lovers to turn down the volume of a guitar-and-bongo concert in the park,” reported the New York Daily News. “The crowd’s reply … was a barrage of bottles, bricks and fists that left seven officers injured.

“And thus began the Summer of Love.”

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Panteha Abareshi Wants You to ‘Hurt Me Badly’ at The Girl Who Loves Roses

Work by Panteha Abareshi (Image courtesy of Larrie, NYC and the artist)

Panteha Abareshi specializes in cutthroat portraits that pair the rawness of ecstatic creation with the realness of first-hand experience. As a young woman of Jamaican and Iranian descent, it seems only natural that she paints other women who look like her. But according to Abareshi, there’s much more at stake than the physical appearance of her subjects.

“I draw women of color only,” she has said of her effort to bring greater visibility to women who are so often left out of, or invisible, in the art world (not to mention under- and misrepresented everywhere else, too). But there are no smiling models or perfect angels in any of the paintings on view at The Girl Who Loves Roses, a show of Abareshi’s work at the new downtown gallery Larrie, NYC (“It’s a women’s space,” founder Emily Spitale told me). Instead, the women you meet are brooding, suffering, and embattled. Often they are splattered in blood, wearing a vacant expression, and seemingly staring at a target point that hovers right between your eyebrows.

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Little Tong Noodle Shop Is Mixian It Up as of Today

Photo by Afra Lu

Let’s face it, ramen has had its day in the noodle-soup limelight. Now it’s time for mixian to take its rightful place among NYC’s noodle royalty. And who better to make this happen than chef Simone Tong, graduate of Wylie Dufresne’s old Lower East Side spot wd~50. After a series of pop-up preview dinners, Tong opens her mixian restaurant, Little Tong Noodle Shop, today in the East Village.

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Here Are Some of the Anti-Trump Comics Being Shown at The Living Gallery Tonight

Looks like throwback anti-Trump comics are officially a thing.

At the Spring/Break show earlier this month, Mr. Vinyl’s pop-art series, The Cisco Kid Vs. Donald Trump, paired Trump takedowns with images pulled from the 1950s comic strip. Tonight at The Living Gallery, “Pussy Grabs Back: A Night of Anti-Trump Comics” will feature the work of Christine Stoddard, a self-proclaimed “fairy punk” who pairs anti-Trump sentiment with fairy tales.

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How Jeremy Nguyen Went From Bushwick Satirist to New Yorker Cartoonist

Photo by Tony Wolf

Last time we spoke with Jeremy Nguyen, he had created a custom crayon for his newly released book of cartoons, Stranger Than Bushwick. The crayon’s color– Gentrify White— spoke to the wry satire found in his comics for Bushwick Daily. Volume three of Stranger Than Bushwick will debut this weekend at the MoCCA Arts Festival. It’s longer than the others, but will be “the last issue I publish for a long time while I move on to other projects,” according to the 27-year-old. That’s sure to disappoint his many local fans, but it’s hard to blame Jeremy for moving on. In January he started submitting cartoons to the New Yorker, a process that is notoriously selective. Incredibly, he sold his first one three weeks later, after pitching just 30 pieces. Since then, he has sold two more.

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