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Park Slopers Say Goodbye to Pavilion Theater, Now in Nitehawk’s Talons

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

As of this morning, the beloved Pavilion is officially no more. Even visiting the Park Slope movie theater’s website early this morning turned up a ghostly message in washed-out grey: “http://www.paviliontheater.com/ has been disabled.”

It’s only appropriate, given that Nitehawk cinemas–the proud new owners of the ratty old Art Deco theater that’s been in decline for several years now– threw a proper New Orleans-style jazz funeral for the place.

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Say a Boozy Buh-Bye to the Park Slope Pavilion Before Nitehawk Takes Over

https-%2F%2Fcdn.evbuc.com%2Fimages%2F24947995%2F67937932711%2F1%2ForiginalBy now you’ve heard that the folks at Williamsburg’s beloved Nitehawk Cinema are giving a $10 million makeover to Park Slope’s ratty Pavilion theater. Which is good news to anyone who has ever gone to Smorgasburg in Prospect Park and thought, “Oh, I’d like to see Snowden but I forgot my bed bug detector.” Still, there are likely some nostalgics who will miss the Pavilion and bitch about the hipsters taking it over and ruining everything with Werner Herzog-themed cocktails like the Even Dewar’s Started Small. (Hey, at least tickets won’t cost $32, like they do for VIP seats at South Street Seaport’s new dine-in theater.)

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Week in Film: Teen Traffickers & Ornette Coleman’s Strange Egg-Sperience


The Preppie Connection
Friday March 18 through Wednesday March 29 at IFC Center: $14

I have a few words for you: Connecticut, prep school, conspicuous wealth, cocaine. If you can get past all of those without your face falling off from cringing so damn hard, then read on– I’m guessing you’re a fan of Cruel Intentions. And if you puked a little, I’ll excuse you. The Preppie Connection, if you can stomach it, takes place at a prep school for the uber-rich and mega-privileged. Unfortunately for Toby, as a kid from a working-class background he only fits into one of those categories, and he has a hard time making nice-nice with the ridiculously good-looking party kids at the school. Hoping to win their attention, especially that of his love interest, a super-blonde girl who adores doing huge rails of cocaine, Toby gets a friend from Colombia to supply him with some high-quality disco shit. Things get out of control and, before you know it, Toby’s the kingpin of an “international drug ring.”

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Five Films: Futuristic Fantasy Spectacles, Creepy Marquis, & Spike Lee Double Dose

City of Gold
Friday March 11 through Thursday March 24 at IFC Center: $14

Perhaps you count yourself among those very special people who know no other way to discover new cities and far-off places than by eating their way through the landscape, from its street food vendors to corner taquerias and refrigerator-less open-air markets (Sorry, looking at the Michelin Guide doesn’t count. Wait, does anyone actually do that?). If so, here’s your chance to meet a man after your own heart. The subject of this doc is Jonathan Gold, the LA-based writer, and the first food critic to win a Pulitzer Prize.

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Four Films: Doomed Love and a Black Dracula for the Ages

River of Grass
Friday March 11 through Thursday March 17 at IFC Center: $14
Director Kelly Reichardt’s first film, River of Grass, has been digitally restored and reissued so that it can finally get the love it deserves. The filmmaker is keen on letting landscapes dictate her characters’ (usually bizarre) states of mind. Reichardt’s 2010 Western drama, Meek’s Cutoff, was soooo Oregon Trail: it’s about a family that’s doing the covered wagon thing and find themselves lost in a desert with dwindling supplies– as the travelers grow increasingly thirsty, they begin to look more and more at home in the arid, harsh wilds of the desert. River of Grass is infused with a different kind of darkness, one that’s bitingly funny, which makes sense– the film is set in Southern Florida and the Florida Everglades, after all. We’re also not surprised that the wilds of Florida lend for a much wackier story than we saw with Meek’s.

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Week in Film: STP Freak-Outs Plague the Hippies; an Xmas Demon Stalks ‘Non-Believers’

Silent Night, Deadly Night
Friday Dec. 18 and Saturday Dec. 19, midnight at Nitehawk: $11
Everyone knows the only sufferable holiday films are Xmas-themed horror movies. This 1984 genre classic Silent Night, Deadly Night tells the story of a young boy who witnesses the murder of his parents at the hands of a psychopath dressed as Santa. Traumatized by his exposure to such unspeakable violence, the boy grows into a truly screwed-up young man whose thirst for blood knows no bounds. Oh, and of course he feels the need to don a Santa outfit during his mayhem sprees.

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Week in Film: a Berliner Thriller and Rarely Seen Vids Shot By a Downtown ‘Ethnographer’

Still from Michel Auder film (via Light Industry / Facebook)

Still from Michel Auder film (via Light Industry / Facebook)

Michel Auder + Rebekah Rutkoff: Sunsets and Other Stars
Tuesday, Dec. 15, 7:30 pm at Light Industry: $8 at the door
French artist, photographer, and filmmaker Michel Auder left France in the ’70s for New York City, where he’s resided ever since. He’s maybe best known as Cindy Sherman’s ex-husband (JK, but for real — how do you compete with Cindy Sherman?). Much of his video work (though apparently Auder “did not consider it fine art”) consists of ethnographic snapshots and sceney vignettes, the stuff of Auder’s cool Downtown life amongst artists like Annie Sprinkle, Larry Rivers, Hannah Wilke, among others.

But another good chunk of his focus was deadly personal. Take My Last Bag of Heroin (For Real), a 1993 piece which shows the filmmaker, who battled with heroin addiction for many years, breaking apart a glassine baggie of heroin onto a piece of aluminum foil and smoking the stuff. The video demonstrates the banality of drug use, often depicted as an explosively orgasmic experience, particularly in film.

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Film: a Brief History of Horror and the True Story of IRL Empire Records


If the thought of CMJ renders you an anxious, nail-biting, hair-pulling mess we’ve got some sweet alternatives for you, in places where you can hide away in a dark room without having to talk to people and avoid being regarded as a social misfit at the same time. “I’m just more into movies,” you can practice telling them. And hey, even if you’re not going to a music show per se, you can still join in the very trendy #notCMJ, which is currently trending on trendy website Twitter. Gobble up our film picks lurking just below this line.

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Week in Film: Teenage Werewolves and Art-House Aliens

Get ready this week for films that are at once fantastical and grounded in sometimes harsh reality. Our top picks include an art-house sci-fi film that says more about immigration than extra-terrestrials, one werewolf flick that proves the Scandinavians are masters of mixing the banality of small town life and horror, and more. Peep on.

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Week in Film: Dada Brunch, Florida in Celluloid Form, and More


Have we got an interesting crew for you this week! Our lineup is a regular emotional rollercoaster, from feel-horrible humanitarian films about sex slaves and child soldiers all the way to feel-sick, total-garbage cult Martial Arts-action films. Don’t try to swallow them all at once is our only advice.

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Week in Film: Mutant-Led Revolution and Spaceship-Driven Satire

Hi, are you feeling patriotic yet? Usually I’m not either, but that whole Obama singing “Amazing Grace” thing still hasn’t quite worn off. I’d call you a liar if you said you didn’t cry at least a little bit. Like, that was some realness. Or maybe just a speech writer’s brilliant means of getting us to forget about… what are those thingamabobs called again? Those silent death dealing demons of the sky? Oh right, drones. Well, at least I had a brief moment of nationalist, er, I mean patriotic pride this Birthday Season.

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Week in Film: DJ Party Life, Cops in Action, and One Legendary Wig

We’ve got a lot to look forward to this summer when it comes to film, we’re rather pleased to hear about a couple of serious outdoor film fests spotlighting movies for film heads. But if rain does hit or you get sick of sunning it up in favor of a cold, dark, refrigerator-like vacation from people and sun-fun and this most jolly of seasons, you’ve always got our humble lil list to tap for ways to escape. This week, we’ve got a film about the whirlwind romp that was one French DJ’s life, one very important wig, and the cray cray life of a Beach Boy.

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