Museum of Chinese in America

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Art This Week: Immigrant-Made Paper Sculptures, The Opioid Trail + More

(image via Superchief Gallery NY / Facebook)

Ron Wimberly
Opening Thursday, October 5 at Superchief Gallery NY, 7 pm to midnight. On view through October 26.

Ronald Wimberly is not only a visual artist creating compelling and colorful images, but has also designed and completed narrative illustrations for multiple graphic novels and companies like Nike and Marvel. He’s even drawn a comic combining Brooklyn gentrification and vampires. This week, you won’t just find Wimberly’s work within the pages of comics like Prince of Cats and Black History In Its Own Words, but on view in a solo show at Ridgewood’s Superchief Gallery. There, you can see unique renditions of sports players, rappers, bubblegum-colored cartoon creations, and surely much more, as Wimberly has a lot of work out there. Keep Reading »

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Chinese Food Stories, Dirty Drawings, and More Art This Week

(flyer via Mia Schachter / Facebook)

(flyer via Mia Schachter / Facebook)

Co//Modified: A Showcase of Design Artists
Opening Monday October 3 at The Living Gallery, 7 pm to 10 pm. One night only. 

In this one-night-only show curated by Mia Schachter, eight artists who “straddle the line of intention between utilitarian design and art” will make their way to Bushwick’s The Living Gallery to show their work. Many of these artists make work that they predominantly try to sell as useful objects, like hyperstylized papier-mâché percussion instruments, ceramic mugs or pots, and embroidery. This show seeks to lay their salesperson spirit to rest momentarily so they can merely show off their creations as art. But if you’d like to go home with a piece or two, you’ll be able to do so as well.

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This New Art Space Is Gangster About Preserving Chinatown’s Heritage

Max Waldman, Michelle Esteva, and Jordan Hill of Chinatown Soup. (Photos: Paula Ho)

Max Waldman, Michelle Esteva, and Jordan Hill of Chinatown Soup. Gate art by Boy Kong. (Photos: Paula Ho)

Gentrification is inevitable, the folks at Chinatown Soup know that. But Michelle Esteva, Jordan Hill, and Max Waldman are ready. Sleeves rolled up and muscles flexed, they’re eager to preserve the cultural heritage of Chinatown — downtown Manhattan’s final frontier — one art exhibition at a time.

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How Bandit’s Roost Blossomed Into Chinatown’s Columbus Park

"Mulberry Bend" shows Mulberry Street looking north to Bayard Street. (From Jacob A. Riis's "How the Other Half Lives.")

“Mulberry Bend” shows Mulberry Street looking north to Bayard Street. (From Jacob A. Riis’s “How the Other Half Lives.”)

Watching people enjoy mah-jongg in Chinatown’s Columbus Park, it’s hard to imagine the site was a dangerous, decrepit slum in the late 1800s. Photojournalist and social reformer Jacob A. Riis dedicated a chapter in his 1890 book How the Other Half Lives to the squalid conditions in the area then known as Mulberry Bend.

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Tyrus Wong, Visionary Behind Disney’s Bambi, Peeped His Solo Exhibit at MOCA

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Tyrus Wong (China, b. 1910). <em>Bambi</em>, 1942 Visual development. Watercolor on paper. Courtesy of Mike Glad. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Tyrus Wong (China, b. 1910). Bambi, 1942 Visual development. Watercolor on paper. Courtesy of Mike Glad. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Wong looks at a photo of himself and his wife Ruth taken at their home in Southern California in the 1950s. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Wong looks at a photo of himself and his wife Ruth taken at their home in Southern California in the 1950s. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Tyrus Wong, <em>Bambi</em> (visual development), 1942. Watercolor on paper; 10 x 11.5 in. Courtesy of Tyrus Wong Family, ©Disney. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Tyrus Wong, Bambi (visual development), 1942. Watercolor on paper; 10 x 11.5 in. Courtesy of Tyrus Wong Family, ©Disney. (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Wong with Nancy Yao Maasbach, president of Museum of Chinese in America (far left) and Gale Brewer, Manhattan Borough President (center). (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Wong with Nancy Yao Maasbach, president of Museum of Chinese in America (far left) and Gale Brewer, Manhattan Borough President (center). (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Tyrus Wong (China, b.1910). <em>Bambi</em>, 1942 visual development. Watercolor on paper. Courtesy of Tyrus Wong Family (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Tyrus Wong (China, b.1910). Bambi, 1942 visual development. Watercolor on paper. Courtesy of Tyrus Wong Family (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Tyrus Wong (China, b.1910). <em>Bambi</em>, 1942 visual development. Watercolor on paper. Courtesy of Tyrus Wong Family (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

Tyrus Wong (China, b.1910). Bambi, 1942 visual development. Watercolor on paper. Courtesy of Tyrus Wong Family (Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

(Photo: Frank Mastropolo)

If you’ve seen the Disney animated classic Bambi, you’ve experienced the art of Tyrus Wong. An exhibition of his work opened Wednesday night at the Museum of Chinese in America. It’s titled Water to Paper, Paint to Sky: The Art of Tyrus Wong. Wong, who is 104 years old, attended the Chinatown event. We walked with him during his first look at the collection of his life’s work.

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