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Art This Week: Continued Haunts, Queer Ceramics, and Planning Ahead For Death

(image via Leslie-Lohman Museum / Facebook)

Objectified
Opening Friday, November 3 at Leslie+Lohman Prince Street Project, 6 pm to 8 pm. On view through November 5.

This swift three-day exhibition shows the work of queer ceramic artist Caitlin Rose Sweet. I first encountered Sweet’s work when I interviewed her about a show she was doing inspired by Bosch’s notorious triptych The Garden of Earthly Delights. Since then, she hasn’t stopped whipping up sculptural pieces that impressively mix elements of grotesque and feminine. Friday, her solo show Objectified is unveiled to the public, placing the queer femme body in all its manifestations on view. Sweet’s ceramic sculpture creations can resemble traditional craft art, domestic home goods, genitalia, gnarled fingers, and fantastical beasts all at once. Will you be entranced or spooked? Keep Reading »

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Week in Shows: Sonic Immersion Excursion and Girls, Girls, Girls

(Flyer via Le Poisson Rouge)

Concert for Immigration Rights: Glasser, Underground System, Tigue, Elena Moon Park & Friends, Ashley Bathgate, and Ljova
Wednesday March 22, doors 7 pm at Le Poisson Rouge: $25

Le Poisson Rouge is hosting a benefit this week for the New York Immigration Coalition, which is cool. As you might expect, they’ve put together an eclectic lineup to help rake in the cash for a chill cause: defending immigrants rights. Funds are going directly to the New York Immigration Coalition (NYIC) which provides services that LPR says are “particularly crucial in the wake of the recent presidential executive actions.” Hear, hear.

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Jonesing For Good Shows? Take Your Lady Pills

Lady Pills (Photo via PopGun Presents/ Facebook)

Lady Pills, Dead Stars, RIPS, Monograms
Wednesday March 15, 8 pm at Trans-Pecos: $10 

Another one of our own bit the dust– say it with me: RIP Shea Stadium. Now what? Get out there and keep supporting DIY venues across the city. And yes, that also goes for homegrown spots that just happen to be certified-legit, grown-up, and now pleasant after years of hard and risky work– never forget that these dudes are threatened by the looming, apparently totally arbitrary powers that be.

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Art Hearts: Beach Party in the City, Sunshine Ruins, and Bye Bye in Bed-Stuy

Peyton Freiman, "JFK was a Realist," 2015. Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Canvas, 6 x 3.5 inch. (image via Shin Gallery)

Peyton Freiman’s “JFK was a Realist,” 2015 (Image courtesy of Shin Gallery)

Long Gone and Missing
Opening Wednesday August 1, 7 pm to 9 pm at Shin Gallery. On view through September 10. 

Imagine a beach on the Lower East Side. Now imagine that beach stuffed inside an art gallery. Some might call it crazy, but this wacky dream will become reality at the opening of Peyton Freiman’s solo show, Long Gone and Missing. The Brooklyn-based artist (who also recently showed a piece in loft-gallery Club 157’s first group show) will transform Shin Gallery into a “veritable beach playground” filled with his colorful mixed media works on paper.

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Performance Picks: Dancing Comedians, Personhood Through Puns, Interactive Foreplay

WEDNESDAY
(via Facebook)

(via Facebook)

Nationals: An Amateur Adult Dance Comedy Tournament
At UCB Chelsea, 307 W 26th Street, Chelsea. 11pm. $5. More info here.
Dara Katz and Betsy Kenney host this four-month-long wild n’ wacky dance competition where the goal is not to dance in the prettiest way or for the longest time, but rather whose dancin’ feet make for the most chuckles. Sure, you can argue that many dance competitions run the risk of being unintentionally comedic already, but just imagine a dance competition where everything is supposed to be funny. Will there be technically skilled, tightly-crafted pieces using formal dance moves to inspire laughter? Probably not, because the teams are mostly made up of comedians. But you never know– there could be some surprises. Competitors include a team of two, a team of almost 10, and comedian Annie Donley (The Annoyance, SOAP’s Messy Backyard Show) going at it solo. And rest assured, whatever happens, a star WILL be born.

 

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Good Shows: Get Lost in a Trippy Maze of Sonic Delights; Mosh on a Fresh Grave

(Flyer via the Acheron)

(Flyer via the Acheron)

The Last Punk Gig: Aspects of War, Warthog, Indignation, Porvenir Oscuro 
Friday, July 8, 8 pm at the Acheron: $15.
In honor of the Acheron and the punk scene it has put up with, fed/clothed, and sated for the last six years, the East Williamsburg venue (which is closing due to a struggle with their insurance company) is gathering up its biddies and besties to bid farewell to its hallowed walls. As the venue’s co-owner Bill Dozer promised, they’re filling up the last stretch with a bunch of benefits, including their very last night of business which is dedicated to the family of Brandon Ferrell (former drummer for Municipal Waste), a local musician and friend of everyone, apparently. All profits and bar sales from the show are going to the family, so you can feel good about getting super, super sloshed at the Acheron’s last hurrah.

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This Journey Into Sound and Silence Pays Tribute to John Cage and a ‘Deaf Club’ For Punks

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

(Photo: Nicole Disser)

If you enter the cordoned-off projection room at LA-based artist Alison O’Daniel‘s newly-opened exhibition, Room Tone at just the right moment (anytime between now and May 8, when the show is on view at Knockdown Center), you’ll bump right into the summer of 1980, when a packed house at one of San Francisco’s weirdest “social experiments” known as the Deaf Club, had gathered for the venue’s very last punk show. The legendary punk club, which had originally functioned as a social club for the deaf since it was founded in the 1930s, came about when the building’s owners decided to rent out some extra space. The deaf social remained while the place became a raucous DIY show space by night, drawing artists, musicians, and underground types like John Waters.

In O’Daniel’s film, we see some of the deaf people playing card games, unperturbed as the floors rattle and shake around them, and others wandering through the punk show as if in a dream, continuing to engage in their intimate sign conversations, while the wild noise around them proves to have little power in disrupting their connection. On the flip side, the punk show goes on, too– the presence of the Deaf Club members has no effect on the punk catharsis. I imagined a giant venn diagram– the small sliver in the center being the smidgen of experience that the deaf and hearing people shared in this scene, and the almost whole worlds that remained intact outside where the circles met. As a hearing impaired person, O’Daniel can jump back-and-forth between these two separate circles of experience, just one perspective that makes Room Tone so profoundly brain shifting.

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Art: “First Person View” Drone Exhibition

Cara Francis sets up her drone for "Remote" (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Cara Francis sets up her drone for “Remote” (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Drones– amongst the most controversial technology of our time– as weapons, tools, and toys have given us the opportunity to see things through a new pair of eyes. Curators at Knockdown Center spent months recruiting a bunch of artists to utilize drones in relation to art work, however that may be interpreted.Visitors will have a chance to fly the drones themselves through various obstacle course-like installations and engage with them in participatory performance art like Cara Francis’ Remote in which the artist’s drone interrogates then dances with volunteers.

Special performances are scheduled throughout the exhibition’s tenure.

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Drone Performance With ‘Sexy Undertones’ at First Person View

“All the drones were dead and gone by the end,” my friend laughed, filling me in on the last hour of opening night at First Person View, the Knockdown Center’s drone-centric art exhibition. The show lifted off last weekend after months of planning; unfortunately/fortunately, my friend’s account of all the mayhem I’d missed by leaving early wasn’t 100 percent accurate. “The show will go on!” Vanessa Thill, who co-curated the show, assured us. “Crashing is all part of the fun.”

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Drones to Invade Knockdown Center This Summer

The Knockdown Center is accepting submissions for a drone obstacle course to be built this summer (Photo: Nicole Disser)

The Knockdown Center is accepting submissions for a drone obstacle course to be built this summer (Photo: Nicole Disser)

Call me a hyper-sensitive freak, but when I first heard the buzzing sound of a drone hovering above the smooth concrete floor at Knockdown Center, I got the chills. There’s something deeply ominous about drones, not least of all because they’ve become synonymous with a futuristic, one-sided (for now anyway) kind of warfare that’s shrouded in secrecy. Somewhat evil undeniably, but drones are also fascinating. “I have a drone newsfeed and stuff pops up like every day, probably 10 or 15 different stories ranging from ‘Three People Killed in Pakistan’ to ‘Drone Captures Surfing Dolphin’ or ‘Perverts are Spying on People,'” said Michael Merck, the creative director at Knockdown Center. It’s no wonder, then, that the Queens-based art center has chosen drones as the centerpiece of its summer exhibition.

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Calling All Bicycle Fetishists, Car Crazies, and Subway Nostalgics

Listen up, transportation nation! The next few months are going to be a trip, no matter what your preferred mode of hitting the road. 

Maspeth World of Wheels
Saturday, June 21, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. at Knockdown Center, 52-19 Flushing Ave., Ridgewood, Queens
The above video teaser alone is worth the price of admission ($5) to this auto show curated by artists including Grayson Cox, Elizabeth Ferry, Jeff Degolier and Michael Merck, who was last seen producing the Knockdown Center’s flea marketAmong the “100 carcentricities” promised are a steamroller, Honda festishists, “scary tow trucks and impressive Lamborghinis,” a Playgirl van and some artists confronting the “automobile as our nation’s long standing symbol of manifest destiny and superfluous ingenuity.” Music by The Dangles and The Golden Grass from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
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The Lost Lectures Found Their Way to NYC, With Dev Hynes, Amanda Lepore and More

Not only did New York get its first taste of the Hump! Film Festival, but on Friday it was introduced to The Lost Lectures. If you haven’t been to installments of the series in London and Berlin, it’s a show-and-tell conducted by a handful of irreverent types at an address that’s only announced to ticketholders a day or two in advance.
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