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Week in Film: See the Stooges Have a Real Cool Time and Get Shrieked at a Spooky Film Streak


Gimme Danger
Friday October 28 through Thursday November 3 at IFC Center: $14.50

I’m hoping at least a few of you out there, like me, are cursed/blessed by a bizarro Pavlovian response to the words “No Fun”– whenever they’re uttered, even in passing, you immediately drop whatever or whoever you’re doing, wherever you may be, and start thrashing around like a seahorse at the tail end of his week-long soak in a Benzedrine bath.

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Iggy Pop Covered Bowie, Did Poems Set to Philip Glass at Tibet House Concert

Iggy Pop and harpist Lavinia Meijer. (Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Tibet House)

Iggy Pop and harpist Lavinia Meijer. (Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Tibet House)

Buddhists were known to be aggressors until they realized that “being violent and domineering was no fun,” said Robert Thurman at the start of Tibet House’s 26th annual benefit concert. Thurman (co-founder of Tibet House US and father of Uma) repeated the words “no fun” and “boring” as if to subtly hype the show’s headliner. But when Iggy Pop closed out the epic evening at Carnegie Hall, it wasn’t with hits like “No Fun” and “I’m Bored” – instead he performed a couple of unusual spoken-word pieces to the music of the evening’s host, Philip Glass, followed by a pair of rousing David Bowie covers.

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25 Rockin’ Facts About HBO’s Scorsese-Jagger Show, Vinyl

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Vinyl, the Scorsese-Jagger production we’ve been looking forward to with bated coke-breath ever since it filmed in the East Village, finally hit HBO last night with an epic two-hour episode, and the critical reaction has been pretty much love it or hate it. Even if you’re with the East Village’s own Richard Hell in the latter camp, you’re probably going to watch at least another episode or two, just to bask/wallow in the ambience of the early-’70s New York City music scene. So here are some fun facts about the show that we’ve culled from around the net, and from our own archives.
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Catch East Village Royalty (Iggy Pop, Philip Glass) at These Regal Venues

Two members of East Village royalty, Philip Glass and Iggy Pop, have upcoming gigs at venues that befit their majesty. Iggy, whose throne is in Miami these days, just released the first and second songs off of Post Pop Depression, his recently announced album with Josh Homme of Queens of the Stone Age (out March 18). The supergroup (also made up of members of The Dead Weather and Arctic Monkeys) announced tour dates today. The NYC stop, on April 12, will be at the United Palace Theatre, the gilded, grandiose former movie palace in Washington Heights. (The onetime Loews “wonder theater” was a sister of the Kings Theatre in Flatbush, and is bigger and possibly even more jaw-dropping than its lavish sibling.) Tickets go on sale Saturday at 10 a.m., with presales starting Thursday.

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The Week David Bowie Met Lou Reed, Iggy Pop and Andy Warhol: An Inside Look

Tony Zanetta and David Bowie, August 22, 1974 at Sigma Sound Studios in Philadelphia, during the Young American sessions. (Photo: Dagmar) after that  all-night session.

Tony Zanetta and David Bowie, August 22, 1974 at Sigma Sound Studios in Philadelphia, during the Young American sessions. (Photo: Dagmar)
after that all-night session.

In the early 1970s, New York actor Tony Zanetta performed in underground theater in plays by Andy Warhol, Jackie Curtis and Wayne/Jayne County. His portrayal of Warhol in the play “Pork” would have him meet David Bowie in London. When Bowie visited New York in 1971, Zanetta guided him through the town’s nightlife. He soon became part of Bowie’s inner circle as tour manager of the Ziggy Stardust and Diamond Dogs tours and helped run Bowie’s MainMan management organization. Zanetta had not seen Bowie in over 40 years when he learned of his death this week. Below, Zanetta recalls the exciting time when Bowie arrived in New York an unknown who would soon become a superstar.

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The Man Who Fell to Earth: David Bowie’s Formative Years in ’70s New York

Mourners laid flowers and outside David Bowie's apartment on Lafayette Street (Kavitha Surana)

Mourners laid flowers and outside David Bowie’s apartment on Lafayette Street (Kavitha Surana)

By now you’re well aware that David Bowie has died, just days after his 69th birthday and the release of his 25th studio album. During the wee hours of January 10, it was announced that the beloved glam-rock icon who embraced androgyny and far-out, endlessly influential aesthetics “died peacefully today surrounded by his family after a courageous 18 month battle with cancer.”

After finding fame in his hometown of London and absconding to the U.S. in 1974, Bowie moved amongst New York’s downtown crowd, popping up at places like Andy Warhol’s Factory and Max’s Kansas City, before relocating to Los Angeles. We consulted a number of publications — one of them yet to be published — that offered an eye into Bowie’s life in early-’70s NYC.
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Film: Asthma

Film still from "Asthma" (Photo via IFC Center)

Film still from “Asthma” (Photo via IFC Center)

Gus is a scuzzy dude with long stringy hair and a heroin problem– he resembles Jay Reatard in all the wrong ways and none of the right ones. At first it looks like he’s just another one of those trust-fund kids living in New York City with a seemingly endless opium supply chain and a cool old car, but turns out the Rolls Royce is stolen. A babe-ish tattoo artist finds this out the hard way. I mean, seriously, who ever responds to a guy yelling at you to “hop in” the car by actually hopping in the car? And why is she into this guy in the first place? He’s clearly high all the time. These questions, ladies and gentlemen, are exactly what’s regrettably pulling me into this film. Guilty pleasures, somebody’s gotta have em. Also, Iggy Pop has a cameo. Additional screenings daily (with the exception of Sunday Oct. 25th) at 10:50 am at IFC Center.

Read more about the film here.

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Week in Film: An Iggy Pop Cameo and the Artist Who Wowed Los Angelinos With 100 Mules

Let it be known this is your last week to get in anything besides horror films y’all, so listen up. We’ve got an anthropology-themed film fest, a drug-fueled road trip romance, mule-inspired capitalist critique, and ha woops– a horror marathon. Enjoy!

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Karaoke Bacchae

As the name implies, Karaoke Bacchae is a take on Euripides’ classic tragedy, The Bacchae. This reimagining takes place not in ancient Greece, but in a karaoke bar during the Stanley Cup. And instead of witnessing a fleshy Dionysus blob around in a flowing robe, we’re treated to an appropriately shirtless Iggy Pop (well, an actor playing Iggy Pop, at least) as a not-too-far-fetched stand-in for the party god.

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From the Factory to Clublandia, Two Exhibitions Will Bring You Back to the Good Ol’ Days

The Last Party exhibition at WhiteBox (Photo: Nicole Disser)

The Last Party exhibition at WhiteBox (Photo: Nicole Disser)

While wandering from gallery to gallery yesterday in the Lower East Side, soaking up a pair of museum-like nostalgia exhibitions focusing on at least one part if not all of a few-decades long span from Warhol’s Factory days through the ’90s club kid scene, I started thinking about a conversation I’d had with one JJ Brine, Satanic gallerist extraordinaire. Before JJ took off for Vanuatu (btw according to his Facebook page, he made it just fine), he explained he was departing indefinitely because he was frustrated with what he understood as New York City’s unusual fixation on the past at the expense of devoting energy to the future. I couldn’t have agreed more, but somehow The Last Party and Michael Alig’s appropriately-titled solo exhibition, Inside / Out succeed in drawing a line, however crooked, between the past and the present and making this nostalgia part of current existence. How? Well, I felt as though I could almost see myself in some of the blurry old party photos and even the creepy clown-like painted odes to various poisons of choice.

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This Playwright Imagined Iggy Pop as Dionysus in a New Version of The Bacchae

(Photo: Meta-Phys Ed.)

(Photo: Meta-Phys Ed.)

Something caught our eye among the experimental, unusual, and low-budget plays that comprise the Ice Factory Festival, a spotlight of “the most exciting downtown companies” that starts today. As the name implies, Karaoke Bacchae is a take on Euripides’ classic tragedy, The Bacchae. This reimagining takes place not in ancient Greece, but in a karaoke bar during the Stanley Cup. And instead of witnessing a fleshy Dionysus blob around in a flowing robe, we’re treated to an appropriately shirtless Iggy Pop (well, an actor playing Iggy Pop, at least) as a not-too-far-fetched stand-in for the party god. We just had to speak with playwright and director Jesse Freedman (co-founder of the production company, Meta-Phys Ed.) about his absurdist punk take on classical Greek theater.

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